LECTURE 2 LETTER FORMAT LETTER FORMAT Business Lexis

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LECTURE 2 LETTER FORMAT

LECTURE 2 LETTER FORMAT

LETTER FORMAT Business Lexis single-spaced (adj) → typed (copied) without leaving a space between

LETTER FORMAT Business Lexis single-spaced (adj) → typed (copied) without leaving a space between the lines; double-spacing (n) → typing (coping) with a full space between lines; paragraph break → division of paragraphs; even (adj) → in the same plane or line; line (n) → a horizontal line of typed (copied) letters; ample (adj) → enough to satisfy; margin (n) → the edge or border of the line;

LETTER FORMAT Business Lexis slash (n) → an oblique stroke (/) in print or

LETTER FORMAT Business Lexis slash (n) → an oblique stroke (/) in print or writing, used between alternatives (and/or), in fractions (3/4), in ratios (miles/day), or between separate elements of a text; colon (n) → a punctuation mark (: ) used to precede a list of items, a quotation, or an expansion or explanation; lowercase (n, adj) → small letters as opposed to capital letters (uppercase); initial → the first letter of a name or word, typically a person's given name or a word forming part of a phrase; enclosure → a document or object placed in an envelope together with a letter;

LETTER FORMAT Business Lexis discard (v) → to get rid of something as no

LETTER FORMAT Business Lexis discard (v) → to get rid of something as no longer useful or desirable; consistent (adj) → in agreement, harmonious; correspond (v) → to agree with or match; ream (n) → a quantity of paper, usually 500 sheets; “carbon” copy → a duplicate copy of writing, typewriting, or drawing; duplicate (adj) → exactly like something else, especially through having been copied. tab stop → a term used to describe the location the cursor stops after the tab key has been pressed.

LETTER FORMAT Introduction When we have composed the body of our letter and are

LETTER FORMAT Introduction When we have composed the body of our letter and are ready to type, we should keep in mind three things: 1. Typing: Letters should be single-spaced with double-spacing between paragraphs. Print should be clear and dark. Errors should not be erased or corrected after printing. 2. Paragraphing: Paragraph breaks should come at logical points in our message and should also result in an EVEN appearance. A one-line paragraph followed by an eight-line paragraph will not look balanced. Paragraphs of approximately the same length will please the eye.

LETTER FORMAT Introduction 3. White space: In addition to the space created by paragraphing,

LETTER FORMAT Introduction 3. White space: In addition to the space created by paragraphing, we should leave space by centering our letter on the page. An ample margin of white space should surround the message, top and bottom as well as both sides. If a letter is brief, we should avoid beginning to type too high on the page; if a letter is long, we should not hesitate to use an additional sheet of paper.

LETTER FORMAT Parts of a Business Letter 1. Letterhead: This is printed and supplied

LETTER FORMAT Parts of a Business Letter 1. Letterhead: This is printed and supplied by our employer. It is used only for the first page of a letter. 2. Dateline: The date on which the letter is being prepared is typed a few lines below the letterhead. 3. Inside Address: The address of our reader is typed as it will appear on the envelope. 4. Attention Line: This is not always required. It should be used when the letter is addressed to a company or organization as a whole, but we want it to be handled there by a specific individual. It should be underlined or typed in capitals.

LETTER FORMAT Parts of a Business Letter 5. Salutation: We should use an individual’s

LETTER FORMAT Parts of a Business Letter 5. Salutation: We should use an individual’s name whenever it is known, preceded by the word Dear. When the reader’s name is not known, the person’s title is the next best term in a salutation. Dear Sir, Dear Madam or Sir, Gentlemen and Ladies are acceptable in cases of extreme formality. 6. Subject Line: It is often omitted, but it is courteous to include it. It identifies the content of our message, so our reader may decide whether the letter requires immediate attention. It should be underlined or typed in capitals. 7. Body: This is the actual message of our letter.

LETTER FORMAT Parts of a Business Letter 8. Complimentary Closing: This is a polite,

LETTER FORMAT Parts of a Business Letter 8. Complimentary Closing: This is a polite, formal way to end a letter; standard forms are Yours truly or Truly yours, Sincerely yours, Respectfully yours. Excessively familiar closings should be avoided, except in special situations. Best wishes, for example, could be used when the reader is well known to us. Affectionate expressions, such as Fondly or Love, should, obviously, be reserved for private correspondence. 9. Company Signature: This item is often omitted from less formal correspondence; it should be used when the signer of the letter is writing as a spokesperson for the company, not as an individual. Since this information appears in the letterhead, some companies omit it altogether.

LETTER FORMAT Parts of a Business Letter 10. Signer’s Identification: Printed four lines below

LETTER FORMAT Parts of a Business Letter 10. Signer’s Identification: Printed four lines below the previous item to allow space for the signature; this includes the signer’s name and any relevant titles. 11. Reference Initials: Consisting of the signer’s initials in capitals followed by a slash or colon followed by the lowercase initials of the person preparing the letter; this item serves as a reminder of who prepared the letter. 12. Enclosure Reminder: Consisting of the word enclosure, followed by a list of the enclosed items, this is a practical courtesy to prevent our reader from discarding important matter with the envelope. 13. “CC” Notation: Also a courtesy, this tells the reader who has been sent a “carbon” copy of the letter.

LETTER FORMAT Letter Sample WALMART 1. 15134 Sunrise Street Spokane, Washington 11512 2. July

LETTER FORMAT Letter Sample WALMART 1. 15134 Sunrise Street Spokane, Washington 11512 2. July 9, 2012 3. White’s Collection Agency 1516 Regency Boulevard Spokane, Washington 11510 4. ATTENTION: MS. TERRY ROBERTS

5. Gentlemen and Ladies: 6. Subject: Mr. Gary Daniels, Account # 69 112 003

5. Gentlemen and Ladies: 6. Subject: Mr. Gary Daniels, Account # 69 112 003 7. We would like to turn over to your services the account of Mr. Gary Daniels, 4441 Natick Avenue, Sherman Oaks, Spokane 11509. The balance on Mr. Daniels’ account, $829. 95, is now 120 days past due; although we have sent him four statements and five letters, we have been unable to collect his debt. Mr. Daniels is employed by West Coast Furniture Showrooms, Inc. He banks at the Natick Avenue branch of Third National City Bank and has been our customer four years. We have enclosed his file for your reference. We are confident that we can rely on White’s Collection

 Agency as we have in the past. Please let us know if there

Agency as we have in the past. Please let us know if there is any further information with which we can furnish you. 8. Sincerely yours, 9. WALMART 10. Martha Fayman Credit Manager 11. MF/wg 12. Enclosure 13. cc Mr. Norman Hyman

How to Write a Business Letter? An effective letter in business uses short, simple

How to Write a Business Letter? An effective letter in business uses short, simple sentences and straightforward vocabulary. First and foremost, we should make sure that we spell the recipient’s name correctly. We should also confirm the gender and proper title. We should use Ms. for women and Mr. for men. When we don’t know the name of a person and cannot find this information out we may write, “To Whom It May Concern”.

Some common ways to address the recipient: Salutation • • Dear Mr. Powell, Dear

Some common ways to address the recipient: Salutation • • Dear Mr. Powell, Dear Ms. Mackenzie, Dear Frederick Hanson: Dear Editor-in-Chief: Dear Valued Customer Dear Sir or Madam: Dear Madam Dear Sir, In most types of business letter it is common to use a friendly greeting in the first sentence of the letter.

 • I hope you are enjoying a fine summer. • Thank you for

• I hope you are enjoying a fine summer. • Thank you for your kind letter of January 5 th. First paragraph • I came across an ad for your company in The Star today. • It was a pleasure meeting you at the conference this month. • I appreciate your patience in waiting for a response.

After the short opening, we should state the main point of our letter in

After the short opening, we should state the main point of our letter in one or two sentences: • I'm writing to enquire about. . . First paragraph • I'm interested in the job opening posted on your company website. • We'd like to invite you to a members only luncheon on April 5 th. We should use a few short paragraphs to go into greater detail about our main point. Common ways to express unpleasant facts:

Second and third paragraphs • We regret to inform you. . . • It

Second and third paragraphs • We regret to inform you. . . • It is with great sadness that we. . . • After careful consideration we have decided. . . The last paragraph should include requests, reminders, and notes on enclosures. If necessary, our contact information should also be in this paragraph. Some common phrases used when closing a business letter:

 • I look forward to. . . • Please respond at your earliest

• I look forward to. . . • Please respond at your earliest convenience. • I should also remind you that the Final next board meeting is on February paragraph 5 th. • For further details. . . • If you require more information. . .

 • Thank you for taking this into consideration. Final paragraph • I appreciate

• Thank you for taking this into consideration. Final paragraph • I appreciate any feedback you may have. • Enclosed you will find. . . • Feel free to contact me by phone or email.

 • Yours truly, • Yours sincerely, • Sincerely yours Closing • Thank you,

• Yours truly, • Yours sincerely, • Sincerely yours Closing • Thank you, • Best wishes • All the best, • Best of luck • Warm regards,

BUSINESS LETTER STYLES The format (layout) is the visual organization of a business letter.

BUSINESS LETTER STYLES The format (layout) is the visual organization of a business letter. The main business letter formats are: Full Block Style Modified Block Style Indented or Semi-block Style

Full Block Style It is the most formal of all the styles and is

Full Block Style It is the most formal of all the styles and is accepted by most businesses. Every line is left justified. There are no indented lines. The dateline is placed two to six line spaces below the last line of the letterhead. The inside address placement varies depending upon the length of the letter. A common spacing is four line spaces below the date line.

 The salutation is placed two lines below the attention line (if an attention

The salutation is placed two lines below the attention line (if an attention line is provided). The first line of the body is placed two lines below an attention line or two to four lines below the last inside address line. Paragraphs are single spaced, with a double space between paragraphs.

While there are no set rules governing format use, it is generally used for:

While there are no set rules governing format use, it is generally used for: requests or inquiries; claims, announcements; records of agreement; transmittal of other technical documents; job applications.

Modified Block Style Modified block business letters use a slightly different format from the

Modified Block Style Modified block business letters use a slightly different format from the full block ones. Most parts of the letter are left justified and single-spaced. The exception is the dateline, complementary closing, company’s signature, signature line, and signer’s identification. These are tabbed slightly from the center to the right of the paper.

Indented or Semi-block Style The indented or semi-block style of business letter is very

Indented or Semi-block Style The indented or semi-block style of business letter is very similar to the modified block one. The only difference between the two is that the paragraphs of the semi-block letter's body are indented one tab stop. In the US, the indented letter does look a little outdated, although many companies still use it.

Letter Punctuation Styles The salutation and closing should be punctuated consistently: either both are

Letter Punctuation Styles The salutation and closing should be punctuated consistently: either both are followed by punctuation or neither is followed by punctuation. A comma is NOT used after the salutation; this practice is reserved for private correspondence. • Standard or Mixed Punctuation: The salutation is followed by a colon; the complimentary closing is followed by a comma. Within the body, the general rules of punctuation apply. • Open Punctuation: No punctuation is used (that is, no punctuation after salutation and complimentary closing), except in the body. Within the body, the general rules of punctuation apply. Open punctuation style is becoming common, especially in the US.

LETTER FORMAT Postscripts • It would be the best to avoid postscripts; when a

LETTER FORMAT Postscripts • It would be the best to avoid postscripts; when a letter is well planned, all necessary information is be included in the body. • If a postscript is required, it is preceded by P. S. or PS: P. S. Let me remind you of our special discount on orders for a dozen or more of the same model appliance.

LETTER FORMAT Special Paragraphing Quotations of prices or notations of special data are set

LETTER FORMAT Special Paragraphing Quotations of prices or notations of special data are set in a special paragraph, indented five spaces on the left and right, preceded and followed by a blank line.