Juvenile Justice System Overview Maine Department of Corrections

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Juvenile Justice System Overview Maine Department of Corrections Created December 2019 1

Juvenile Justice System Overview Maine Department of Corrections Created December 2019 1

One of the major initiatives of the Maine Department of Corrections (MDOC) Juvenile Division,

One of the major initiatives of the Maine Department of Corrections (MDOC) Juvenile Division, is to reduce the use of institutional secure confinement by increasing the capacity and use of community-based programming and supports. 2

Purposes that Guide the Courts and Agencies A. To secure for each juvenile subject

Purposes that Guide the Courts and Agencies A. To secure for each juvenile subject to these provisions such care and guidance, preferably in the juvenile's own home, as will best serve the juvenile's welfare and the interests of society; B. To preserve and strengthen family ties whenever possible, including improvement of home environment; C. To remove a juvenile from the custody of the juvenile's parents only when the juvenile's welfare and safety or the protection of the public would otherwise be endangered or, when necessary, to punish a child adjudicated, pursuant to chapter 507, as having committed a juvenile crime; D. To secure for any juvenile removed from the custody of the juvenile's parents the necessary treatment, care, guidance and discipline to assist that juvenile in becoming a responsible and productive member of society; E. To provide procedures through which the provisions of the law are executed and enforced and that ensure that the parties receive fair hearings at which their rights as citizens are recognized and protected; and F. To provide consequences, which may include those of a punitive nature, for repeated serious criminal behavior or repeated violations of probation conditions. 15 M. R. S. Sec. 3002(1). 3

Maine Department of Corrections Juvenile Division History • The Maine Youth Center: – The

Maine Department of Corrections Juvenile Division History • The Maine Youth Center: – The Boys Training Center was established in 1853 and later named the Maine Youth Center in 1976. – The Maine Youth Center experienced numerous issues, including; • Overcrowding (Youth sleeping on cots and renting a Pod at Cumberland County Jail) • Extremely poor physical plant conditions • Lack of integrated risk reduction programming/treatment at facility • To improve conditions for youth, two Development Centers were established to replace the Maine Youth Center: – Long Creek Youth Development Center, South Portland (2002) – Mountain View Youth Development Center, Charleston (2002) 4

*Total Number means the total of new commitments within the given year. Committed youth:

*Total Number means the total of new commitments within the given year. Committed youth: when there is a sentence provided by the court after a juvenile has been adjudicated for an offense— 5 shock sentences are excluded from this definition.

*Total Number means the total of new detentions within the given year. Detained Youth:

*Total Number means the total of new detentions within the given year. Detained Youth: when a Juvenile is charged with delinquent act and may be detained by court order pending an 6 adjudicatory and/or disposition hearing, a youth may be placed in a detention facility.

Policy and Practice Enhancements Historic Juvenile Justice Challenges: • High commitment rates; • High

Policy and Practice Enhancements Historic Juvenile Justice Challenges: • High commitment rates; • High detention rates; • High length of stay (committed); and • Low diversion rates. Ø These identified problems led to Policy and Practice changes within the Juvenile Facilities and Juvenile Community Corrections. 7

Policy and Practice Enhancements Cont. Community Corrections Policy & Practice Changes: • Diverting low-risk

Policy and Practice Enhancements Cont. Community Corrections Policy & Practice Changes: • Diverting low-risk and/or first time offenders out of system (2004). • Targeting Criminogenic Risk/Need (Evidenced-Based Practice) (2004). • Youth Offender Level Service Inventory (YO-LSI) (2004). • Comprehensive Case Planning (2004). • Attitudes and beliefs; • Education; • Vocational; • Peer relationships; • Substances use; • Family; and • Pro-Social Activities. • Use of Outpatient behavioral health treatment (Mental Health & Substance Use), Home-Based Treatment Interventions, Hi-Fidelity Wrap Services, Restorative Justice programming, Alternative to Detention placements, Community Service programming, Educational/Employment programming, and 8 Reentry programming.

Policy and Practice Enhancements Cont. Juvenile Community Corrections Officer (JCCO) JCCO’s duties include intake,

Policy and Practice Enhancements Cont. Juvenile Community Corrections Officer (JCCO) JCCO’s duties include intake, supervision, and diversion. – Intake is the first step in diversion. The JCCO will decide to handle the case informally or petition the charge to court. – Supervision and reporting standards will be established once the Risk Assessment is completed then the JCCO will determine the support needed for the youth. – Diversion services will receive referrals from JCCO’s, such as; restorative justice, referral for Hi. Fi Wrap, referral to case management, or referrals to any needed service. • Region 1: 17 JCCO’s • Region 2: 15 JCCO’s • Region 3: 14 JCCO’s – Average Case load is 25 -30 per JCCO. – Case Loads include youth on Community Reintegration, Conditions of Release, Informal Adjustment, Pending violations, petitions authorized, referrals, and formal Probation. 9

Policy and Practice Enhancements Cont. Long Creek Youth Developmental Center Policy and Practice Changes:

Policy and Practice Enhancements Cont. Long Creek Youth Developmental Center Policy and Practice Changes: • Risk Reduction Principles led to the development of a Phase and Level System for the Facility. • Creation of RISE and Bearings House for Post-Commitment Programming. • Increase in treatment programming, including; – Case Management by LSW and Mental Health Assessments done by LCSW’s; – Medical (Wellpath), Psychiatry, Mental Health Counseling and Assessments; – Aggression Replacement Training (ART); – Risk Reduction; – Sexual Behavior Treatment (SBT); – Interpersonal Violence; – Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT); – Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT); – Trauma Focused CBT; – Australian Centre for Arson Research and Treatment (ACART) ; – Community Service; – Voices (Gender specific curriculum); – Healthy Sexuality; – Healthy Relationships; – 7 Challenges; – Helping Men Recover; – Prime for Life; – Safe Group; – Family Crisis Center; and – Sexual Assault Services. 10

Programmatic Investments 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Restorative Justice Programming Community Service

Programmatic Investments 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Restorative Justice Programming Community Service Programming Home-Based Treatment Interventions Hi-Fidelity Wraparound Services Education/Employment Programming Alternative to Detention Placements Reentry Programming Diversion Probation Transition 11

Diversion Interventions • Diversion is when a referred youth (charged or summons) is diverted

Diversion Interventions • Diversion is when a referred youth (charged or summons) is diverted from court. Most diverted youth are referred to diversion programming to address the offense. Programs include; – Restorative Justice – Spurwink Diversion to Assets – Learning Works, Service Works (Community Service) 12

Diversion Interventions Cont. Restorative Justice Programming • Restorative Justice seeks to repair harm to

Diversion Interventions Cont. Restorative Justice Programming • Restorative Justice seeks to repair harm to the victim and community through restorative mediation— two people acknowledging injustices and wrongs; restorative circles—bringing together three parties of conflict to open dialogue; conferencing—brings together those who were affected to provide formal agreement; and dialogues—facilitated conversations. – MDOC new contracts begin in 2015. – In FY 2019, the six RJ Providers served a total of 370 youth. – From FY 2015 to FY 2019, RJ served a total of 1, 128 youth. • Providers: Maine Youth Court, Penquis, Aroostook County Action Program, Restorative Justice Institute, Restorative Justice Project, and Restorative Justice Project at LC. • Volunteer based RJ Providers: Old Orchard Restorative Review Board & Portland RJ Center. Cost of Restorative Justice per year: $870, 000 *Budget numbers are based on Fiscal year 2019 budget 13

Diversion Interventions Cont. Other Diversion Programs: • In FY 2019, the two diversion programs

Diversion Interventions Cont. Other Diversion Programs: • In FY 2019, the two diversion programs served a total of 167 youth. • From FY 2015 to FY 2019, the two programs served a total of 664 youth. – Spurwink Diversion to Assets (2010) is a community based program to assist youth most appropriately served through a diversion project as an alternative to formal court processing or direct referral or involvement in the Juvenile Justice System. – Learning Works, Service Works (2014) provides community service projects for young people making amends for non-violent offenses as a positive alternative to juvenile justice system involvement. Cost of Diversions per year: $225, 000 *Budget numbers are based on Fiscal year 2019 budget 14

Community Service Programming • Learning Works, Service Works (2014) provides community service projects for

Community Service Programming • Learning Works, Service Works (2014) provides community service projects for young people making amends for non-violent offenses as a positive alternative to juvenile justice system involvement. – In FY 19, Learning Works served a total of 99 youth. – From FY 15 to FY 19, Learning works served a total of 372 youth. • Provider: Learning Works – Note: Learning Works is also considered a ‘Diversion Intervention. ’ Cost of Community Service Programming per year: $135, 000 *Budget numbers are based on Fiscal year 2019 budget 15

Home-Based Treatment Interventions Multi-Systemic Treatment (MST) • MST is an intensive family and community-based

Home-Based Treatment Interventions Multi-Systemic Treatment (MST) • MST is an intensive family and community-based treatment for juvenile offenders to decrease criminal behavior and out-of-home placements through in-home treatment. – Originally contracted with MDOC in 2004. – In FY 2019, the three MST providers served a total of 59 youth. – From FY 2015 to FY 2019, MST served a total of 486 youth. • Providers: Kennebec Behavioral Health, Tri-County Mental Health, and Maine Behavioral Healthcare. Functional Family Treatment (FFT) • FFT is a family-based prevention and intervention program for at risk youth and their families. – Originally contracted with MDOC in 2004. – In FY 2019, the two FFT providers served a total of 31 youth. – From FY 2015 to FY 2019, FFT served a total of 305 youth. • Providers: Catholic Charities of Maine and Spurwink. Cost of MST/FFT per year: $1, 046, 460 *Budget numbers are based on Fiscal year 2019 budget 16

Hi-Fidelity Wraparound Services • Wraparound is an evidence-based planning process that is client centered,

Hi-Fidelity Wraparound Services • Wraparound is an evidence-based planning process that is client centered, family driven, community and strengths based, highly individualized and aimed at helping people meet needs both within and outside of formal human services systems, while they remain in their neighborhoods and homes, whenever possible. – Originally contracted with MDOC in 2007. – In FY 2019, the two providers served approximately 180 youth. – From FY 2016 to FY 2019, Wings served a total of 182 youth. – From FY 2015 to FY 2019, Opportunity Alliance Wrap Services served a total of 581 youth. • Providers: Wings Wrap Services & Opportunity Alliance Wrap Services. Cost of Hi-Fi WRAP per year: $330, 000 *Budget numbers are based on Fiscal year 2019 budget 17

Education & Employment Programming Education/Employment Programming • Carleton Project offers a self-paced individualized high

Education & Employment Programming Education/Employment Programming • Carleton Project offers a self-paced individualized high school program that considers the requirements of the State of Maine for a High School Education for youth unable to attend public school. Education and vocational programming, life skills, teen recovery, computer literacy, job skills and public service opportunities are all offered. – Originally contracted with MDOC 2012. – In FY 19, Carleton Project served a total of 8 youth. – From FY 15 to FY 19, Carleton Project served a total of 47 youth. • Provider: Carleton Project Cost of Education & Employment Programming per year: $20, 000 *Budget numbers are based on Fiscal year 2019 budget 18

Alternative to Detention Programming/Housing Short-Term Shelter Beds Center (2012) • Short-Term Shelter beds provide

Alternative to Detention Programming/Housing Short-Term Shelter Beds Center (2012) • Short-Term Shelter beds provide short-term crisis intervention and support services for homeless or at risk youth. – In FY 2019, the two shelter programs served 15 youth. – In FY 2015 to FY 2019, the two shelters served a total of 69 youth. – Providers: New Beginnings Emergency Shelter & Shaw House. After School Reporting Center (2016) • Tree Street Youth provides support for education, social skills, community service completion, transportation, food security, and physical wellness. – In FY 2019, Tree Street served a total of 37 youth. – From FY 2017 to FY 2019, Tree Street served a total of 89 youth. – Provider: Tree Street Youth-Evening Reporting Center. Total Alternative to Detention House cost per year: $262, 250 *Budget numbers are based on Fiscal year 2019 budget 19

Reentry Programming • Reentry programming is to promote safety and support youth transitioning back

Reentry Programming • Reentry programming is to promote safety and support youth transitioning back to the community from secure confinement. – In FY 19, RISE served a total of 8 youth. – In FY 18 and FY 19, RISE served a total of 12 youth. • Providers: – Opportunity Alliance, Realize Independence Surpass Expectations (RISE) (2018) a 6 -bed, Community-based reintegration home for transition age male youth who were committed at Long Creek. – Youth Advocate Programs (2019) Support youth reentering the community after secure confinement by connecting them with an Advocate. • Note: Youth Advocate Programs and RISE are considered ‘New Investments. ’ Cost of Reentry Programming per year: $589, 316 *RISE Budget numbers are based on Fiscal year 2019 budget *YAP Budget numbers are based on project costs for Fiscal year 2021 20

Investment Outcomes DOC Youth Served from 2015 to YTD 2019 Year # of Referrals

Investment Outcomes DOC Youth Served from 2015 to YTD 2019 Year # of Referrals * # Eligible for Diversion Total # Diverted Diversion Rate # of Youth Committed Commitment Rate all Referrals** Commitment Rate of Facility Admissions *** Committed Youth Avg LOS (Days) # of Youth Detained Youth Avg LOS (Days) 15 3351 986 622 63. 3% 61 1. 8% 11% 391 540 14. 0 16 3161 910 574 64. 4% 56 1. 6% 12% 464 443 14. 2 17 2925 897 621 72. 2% 40 1. 3% 8% 425 469 13. 1 18 2648 845 627 84. 7% 29 1. 09% 7% 387 405 14. 5 19**** 2073 414 88% 22 1. 06% 6% 355 340 12. 0 * Referral is based on the creation of a police report. **Commitment Rate is based off of total number of referrals/total committed. ***Commitment Rate is based off of all youth admitted (Detained) into the facility in a given year/total committed. ****YTD 21

Investment Outcome Graphs Commitments by Gender & Race The number of youth who were

Investment Outcome Graphs Commitments by Gender & Race The number of youth who were committed decreased by 53% since 2015. Detentions by Gender & Race The number of youth who were detained decreased by 25% since 2015. 22

Current Investments Opportunity Alliance Realize Independence Surpass Expectations (RISE) Program: – In 2017, MDOC

Current Investments Opportunity Alliance Realize Independence Surpass Expectations (RISE) Program: – In 2017, MDOC contracted with Opportunity Alliance to open a 6 -bed reentry home in Portland to serve 18 year or older males on Community Reintegration status. – Reentry Housing Program: Community-based reintegration home for transition age youth who were committed at Long Creek. RISE assists with housing, independent living skills, education, and employment development. – Fiscal Year 2019, RISE cost $300, 000 per year. Bearings House: – In December 2019 MDOC Opened Bearings House using MDOC staff for Community Custody males in a non-secure community-based setting. – Bearings House is an 8 -bed facility designed to help youth re-enter the community more successfully; through, making community connections, connected with increased educational and employment opportunities, in addition to pro-social recreational and leisure activities in a staff secure environment. 23

Current Investments Cont. Youth Advocate Programs (YAP) – In 2019, MDOC contracted with Youth

Current Investments Cont. Youth Advocate Programs (YAP) – In 2019, MDOC contracted with Youth Advocate Program to serve up to 18 youth per year and connect youth with advocates to assist youth transitioning from Long Creek to the community. – Reentry Programming: Support youth reentering the community after secure confinement by connecting them with an Advocate; the advocate will, build educational opportunities, develop employment opportunities, po-social activities, family engagement and support, while supporting gender and cultural needs. They accept all referrals and have a “No eject, No reject” Policy. – YAP provided MDOC with a $250, 000 Federal Balmer Fund for year one of the contract – Year two and three of the contract, the Department will contribute $189, 316 for YAP. • John T. Gorman Foundation: – Gorman Foundation will provide MDOC $50, 000 per year for three years for YAP, totaling $150, 000 for the three year contract. 24

Current Investments Cont. • MDOC Awarded a Federal Second Chance Reentry Grant ($775, 775)

Current Investments Cont. • MDOC Awarded a Federal Second Chance Reentry Grant ($775, 775) – Programs that will be funded through the 3 -year grant, include: • The Community Success Program • Opportunity Scholars – The program will receive $31, 000 per year. – Muskie School of Public Health is a subrecipient of $45, 000 for ongoing support and program evaluations. • Housing Assistance Program – The program will receive $31, 000 per year. • Credible Messenger Programs – YAP will be provided $100, 000 per year and will assist in expanding Credible Messenger Programs 25

Girls Programming In consultation/recommendations from the Vera Institute to reduce incarceration for girls in

Girls Programming In consultation/recommendations from the Vera Institute to reduce incarceration for girls in Maine: • Focus on Gender Specific programs for girls in consultation with Vera. • Create non-institutional community based residences for non-DHHS custody girls transitioning out of Long Creek. • Partnering with a contract provider and/or using MDOC staff in community based residences. • Create gender specific advocacy/mentor based community based programming to support girls transitioning out of Long Creek back to the community. • Create a position to Coordinate and implement Credible Messenger Mentoring Programs. 26

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