JISC Collections 1 JISC Collections An Introduction to

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JISC Collections 1

JISC Collections 1

JISC Collections An Introduction to JISC Collections: Who are we and what do we

JISC Collections An Introduction to JISC Collections: Who are we and what do we do? Liam Earney JISC Collections Team Manager JISC Collections 10/29/2020 | * | Slide 2

About JISC n The Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC) is funded by all of

About JISC n The Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC) is funded by all of the UK University and College funding bodies n JISC's activities support education and research by promoting innovation in new technologies and by the central support of ICT services. JISC provides: – A world-class network - JANET – Access to electronic resources – JISC Collections – New environments for learning, teaching and research – Guidance on institutional change – Advisory and consultancy services – Regional support for FE colleges - RSCs n Increasingly JISC will be there to support HE in their role as an engine of economic growth and development in the UK JISC Collections 3

About JISC Collections n Established as a mutual trading company in 2006 n Members

About JISC Collections n Established as a mutual trading company in 2006 n Members include all UK HE, FE and Research Councils n National centre for the licensing and procurement of digital content to support education and research n Best pricing and best terms & conditions for the best content n In 2009, savings to the JISC community from JISC Collections activities are estimated at £ 43 million JISC Collections 4

About JISC Collections? n Aims – Save time and money through central licensing and

About JISC Collections? n Aims – Save time and money through central licensing and negotiation that leverages buying power and avoiding duplication of effort – Widen accessibility to online content through best value pricing of subscription resources and the central procurement of content – Help institutions manage the demands of licensing and develop capacity within the sector to improve licence management JISC Collections 5

How does JISC Collections support that mission? n Currently managing over 120 agreements including

How does JISC Collections support that mission? n Currently managing over 120 agreements including – UK National Academic Archive • Over 20 archives licensed in perpetuity and available freely to all UK HE, FE and Research Councils – NESLi 2 • 36 agreements for e-journals – JISC Collections • Over 80 agreements for online databases, reference materials, multimedia resources and e-book collections n Working at all academic levels and with all subject areas n Manages over 5, 500 subscriptions. n 12 members of staff JISC Collections 6

UK National Academic Archive n Content available free to all UK HE, FE and

UK National Academic Archive n Content available free to all UK HE, FE and Research Councils n Early English Books Online n Eighteenth Century Collections Online n 18 th – 20 th Century House of Commons Parliamentary Papers n RSC, Io. PP, ICE, ACS, OUP, Brill, T&F Journal Archives n Historic Map Data n Web of Science Backfiles n And more… JISC Collections 7

NESLi 2 – National Electronic Site Licensing Initiative n NESLi 2 – Large publishers

NESLi 2 – National Electronic Site Licensing Initiative n NESLi 2 – Large publishers – Elsevier – Springer – Nature – ACS – Oxford Journals – Currently 20 agreements n NESLi 2 SMP – Small and Medium Sized Publishers – Brill – Karger – Berg n 16 agreements and growing JISC Collections 8

Database Agreements n Agreements for Bibliographic, A&I, Full Text, Reference materials, Geospatial, E-Books and

Database Agreements n Agreements for Bibliographic, A&I, Full Text, Reference materials, Geospatial, E-Books and other digital content n In January 2009 issued first ITT for a Framework Agreement – 90 proposals n Web of Science, Scopus, British Education Index, Embase n Oxford Reference, Cambridge Companions Online, Literature Online n Ordnance Survey, Hydrospatial, Geology n Times Digital Archive, Electronic Enlightenment n T&F e-books, Knovel, Morgan & Claypool JISC Collections 9

JISC Model Licence n JISC model licences since mid-1990 s – Used with all

JISC Model Licence n JISC model licences since mid-1990 s – Used with all JISC Collections and NESLi 2 agreements – Allows institutions and their users to get the best value from resources through flexible terms of use that offer stability and security to both users and providers n The JISC Model licence is updated annually to take account of changes in: – The business environment – experimenting with new business models – The scholarly environment – VLE’s, reuse of learning materials – The information environment – changes in access management technologies, preservation requirements etc n Aim is licensing developed by the education sector for the education sector with terms that allow the education sector to get on with the business of education JISC Collections 10

Not just about licensing and negotiation… n Projects and reports that review the current

Not just about licensing and negotiation… n Projects and reports that review the current environment and look to meet future requirements of teaching, learning and research – national e-books observatory project – e-books for FE – A comparative study of e-journal archiving solutions n Providing tools to support institutional use and acquisition of electronic resources – Academic Database Assessment Tool n Supporting licensing requirements of JISC Programmes – JISC Digitisation Programme – Copyright Advice and Support Project for Electronic Resources …though all of these should support licensing and negotiation JISC Collections 11

What’s on our minds now? Licensing in a time of economic uncertainty JISC Collections

What’s on our minds now? Licensing in a time of economic uncertainty JISC Collections 12

Economic crisis and the impact on UK academic libraries n Deep Recession n Poor

Economic crisis and the impact on UK academic libraries n Deep Recession n Poor public finances – DIUS (was) expected to deliver additional £ 400 million of savings in 2010 -11 – Freeze if not cuts in public spending n The impact in the public sector will be over a number of years – even if the wider economy recovers JISC Collections 13

The impact on academic libraries - Global n ICOLC Statement on the Global Economic

The impact on academic libraries - Global n ICOLC Statement on the Global Economic Crisis and Its Impact on Consortia Licences “current crisis [is] of such significance that we cannot simply assume that libraries and publishers share a common perspective about the magnitude of the crisis and the best approaches to deal with it” n Following forecasts: 1. Significant and widespread cuts in budget levels for libraries and consortia 2. Cuts will be prolonged 3. Exchange rate fluctuations are complicating and/or amplifying the impact Full statement at: : http: //www. library. yale. edu/consortia/icolc-econcrisis-0109. htm JISC Collections 14

The impact on academic libraries – UK n Research Information Network: “Scholarly books and

The impact on academic libraries – UK n Research Information Network: “Scholarly books and journals at risk: Responding to the challenges of a changing economy” n Fall in the value of Sterling “has already dented library purchasing budgets by 16%. As a result, many large university libraries anticipate deficits of around £ 400, 000 this year and some contracts have yet to be paid. ” n Uncertainty over currency fluctuations means “libraries’ budgetary positions may therefore change unpredictably during the year. […] faced with hard decisions about what to cut, they will be forced to cancel what they can as renewals fall due, rather than what their users might best manage without. ” n “As the proportion of library acquisitions budgets that is spent on journals has risen (from 46% to 53% over the past decade), book purchasing has been ever more squeezed (dropping from £ 32 to £ 30 per FTE student over the past decade). Any further reduction in book purchasing would have a disproportionately damaging effect on the humanities, and many areas of the social sciences” Full briefing at: http: //www. rin. ac. uk/files/Scholarly_books_journals_at_risk. pdf: JISC Collections 15

The impact on academic libraries – UK n An orderly retreat from the big

The impact on academic libraries – UK n An orderly retreat from the big deal? – Jill Taylor-Roe’s survey indicated that in 2010 institutions intend to take the following measures to cope with the economic crisis • Request more funds from the University – 27% • Cut the book fund – 18% (down from 23% this year) • Cut the serials fund – 20% (up from 12% this year) • Cancel big deals – 17% (up from 4% this year) http: //www. uksg. org/sites/uksg. org/files/jill_taylor-roe. pps JISC Collections 16

What is JISC Collections doing? JISC Collections 17

What is JISC Collections doing? JISC Collections 17

JISC Collections Priorities and Negotiation Strategy n Simple really… – Listening to our members!!!

JISC Collections Priorities and Negotiation Strategy n Simple really… – Listening to our members!!! – Discussions with publishers outside of formal negotiations n Priority – To allow academic libraries to maintain access to core digital content n Negotiation strategy – No price rises at renewal – Annual opt out from all agreements JISC Collections 18

What additional steps will JISC Collections take? n Revisit existing agreements to negotiate annual

What additional steps will JISC Collections take? n Revisit existing agreements to negotiate annual opt outs n Greater Value from New Business and Licensing Models – Develop alternatives to the 'opt-in model' – Structure agreements to include access for the whole community – Cross-sectoral licensing - higher education and further education, schools, the NHS and cultural institutions. – Explore how NESLi 2 can be extended to support the transition to Open Access – Sustainable models for e-books - national e-books observatory and the etextbook business trials JISC Collections 19

What additional steps will JISC Collections take? n JISC Collections Request for Proposals –

What additional steps will JISC Collections take? n JISC Collections Request for Proposals – – Get as many resources and providers using the JISC model licence as possible – Better pricing n Improve usage and value of JISC Collections’ National Agreements – Develop portals to bring perpetually licensed material (and JISC funded material) together in one place n Help academic libraries manage their collections and demonstrate value for money – Usage Statistics portal – Briefing papers for every JISC Collections’ member on savings from JISC Collections archival purchases – Licensing that is more about “Can” than “Can’t” • Unfairly, libraries often seen as a barrier to institutional ambitions! JISC Collections 20

Thank you THANK YOU FOR FURTHER INFORMATION PLEASE VISIT: WWW. JISC-COLLECTIONS. AC. UK LIAM

Thank you THANK YOU FOR FURTHER INFORMATION PLEASE VISIT: WWW. JISC-COLLECTIONS. AC. UK LIAM EARNEY L. [email protected] AC. UK JISC Collections 21

JISC Collections 22 29 October 2020 | Project Board Meeting | Slide 22

JISC Collections 22 29 October 2020 | Project Board Meeting | Slide 22

What do the findings mean? Caren Milloy, Senior Collections Manager, JISC Collections c. milloy@jisc.

What do the findings mean? Caren Milloy, Senior Collections Manager, JISC Collections c. [email protected] ac. uk www. jiscebooksproject. org JISC Collections 23 Slide 23

1. ABOUT THE PROJECT JISC Collections 24 Slide 24

1. ABOUT THE PROJECT JISC Collections 24 Slide 24

The Vision The UK education community will have access to quality e-book content that

The Vision The UK education community will have access to quality e-book content that is of high relevance to teaching, learning and research across the broadest range of subject areas. Flexible business and licensing models will support a diversity of needs, allowing users to do what they want when they want and how they want for education purposes. All e-books will be easily discoverable and consistent standards will allow all content to be fully integrated into library, learning and research environments. E-Books Working Group 2007 JISC Collections 25

Why the project? n Different selling chain n What business models? What licensing models?

Why the project? n Different selling chain n What business models? What licensing models? n Not sure what e-books are available n Who should take the lead? JISC Collections 26

Why UK higher education has not bought more e-books n E-book pricing models are

Why UK higher education has not bought more e-books n E-book pricing models are not satisfactory (64%) n There is too little choice of e-book titles (62%) n E-book access models are not satisfactory (53%) n We are waiting for the market to settle down (33%) n We are waiting for JISC Collections to offer better e-book deals (30%) n E-books are too expensive (28%) n I do not know what is available (18%) n There is no demand for e-books here (13%) n Affiliated/ external users are not allowed access (11%) n The technology is too complicated (8%) JISC Collections 27

Project Aims 1. license collections of e-books that are highly relevant to UK higher

Project Aims 1. license collections of e-books that are highly relevant to UK higher education taught course students in four discipline areas: – Business and Management studies – Engineering – Medicine (not mental health or nursing) – Media Studies 2. evaluate the use of the e-books through deep log analysis and to asses the impact of the ‘free at the point of use’ e-books upon publishers, aggregators and libraries 3. transfer knowledge acquired in the project to publishers, aggregators and libraries to help stimulate an e-books market that has appropriate business and licensing models JISC Collections 28

The largest study of its kind! – 36 course text e-books freely available to

The largest study of its kind! – 36 course text e-books freely available to all UK HE – Over 48, 000 responses to benchmarking surveys carried out in January 2008 and in January 2009 – Raw server logs have been analysed to see exactly how users discover, navigate and use the e-books – Case studies including focus groups held at eight universities – Library circulation and print sales data has been analysed JISC Collections 29 Slide 29

2. INITIAL FINDINGS JISC Collections 30 Slide 30

2. INITIAL FINDINGS JISC Collections 30 Slide 30

Use patterns Use of e-books over the year: Sharp peaks and deep declines JISC

Use patterns Use of e-books over the year: Sharp peaks and deep declines JISC Collections Use of e-books over 24 hours: 25% of use between 6 pm and 8 am 31

Where is the use coming from? 31% of off campus use illustrates how important

Where is the use coming from? 31% of off campus use illustrates how important e-books are for home study – so we have got to get the access right Students told us in the survey the most important benefit of the ebook is 24/7 access JISC Collections 32

Users are not raiding the cookie jar! n 761, 352 pages of the JISC

Users are not raiding the cookie jar! n 761, 352 pages of the JISC e-books were viewed n 65, 000 sessions viewed the JISC ebooks. n 13 minute sessions, 8 pages per session n Page view time of 22. 8 seconds n 85% of users spending less than 1 minute on a page n Dip in and out of e-books, only using sections of it, non linear use JISC Collections 33

Types of pages viewed n Content pages are broken down into book table of

Types of pages viewed n Content pages are broken down into book table of contents, book cover, forward and pages. n 70% of users spent their time on actual pages within the e-book, 15% on the foreword, 11% on the table of contents and 4% on the cover. n Page view time: 45% of users spent 10 seconds to 1 minute on the cover page, 44% on the table of contents and only 38% on the actual pages. n 28% of users spent under 5 seconds on the pages compared to 50% on the foreword! n 46% of users spent under 10 seconds on actual pages, much lower that the 66% that spend the same time on the foreword. users spend less time on the actual pages that they do on the foreword, table of contents and cover JISC Collections 34

Self reported user behaviour This shows non-linear use – perhaps a different type of

Self reported user behaviour This shows non-linear use – perhaps a different type of behaviour from the print world? JISC Collections 35

Student focus groups o Use of e-textbooks for short sound bites o Students are

Student focus groups o Use of e-textbooks for short sound bites o Students are in ‘web type mode’ – flick quick and scan o Quick fact extraction o ‘Do what you need to do’ attitude o Only used for short periods of time “I think there is a reasonable consensus that people tend to use ebooks for finding specific pieces of information rather than in terms of extensive reading” JISC Collections 36

Print Books 1. powerful attraction of the innate familiarity and of the physical entity

Print Books 1. powerful attraction of the innate familiarity and of the physical entity that is the printed book 2. easier to absorb information 3. more conducive to certain forms of reading such as scanning 4. more conducive to note making, annotation and highlighting 5. don’t have to put mental processes on hold while waiting for the page to load 6. don’t get disorientated 7. read for longer periods 8. comfortable to read print JISC Collections 37

Print V Electronic? n Why do librarians want to buy ebooks? – Take the

Print V Electronic? n Why do librarians want to buy ebooks? – Take the pressure off short loan collections – To manage the high peaks of use – To provide for their off campus users whether they be distance learners, students at home or on a placement – Equality of access n Librarians want e-books to COEXIST and SUPPLEMENT their print JISC Collections ‘I think it’s mainly the issue of availability – it depends on providing the extra access for short periods of time…. so that you are providing supplementary access for things that are on reading lists – or in short loan; so everyone is getting access to them’ 38

Print sales The findings from the study and the analysis of the print sales

Print sales The findings from the study and the analysis of the print sales data indicates that making available course text e-books free at the point of use is not a threat to print sales revenue – Students are using e-books in addition to the print they bought or borrowed! – New business models must account for the uneven use non linear user behaviour – Allow for convenience – 24/7 access and peaks of use – E-books and print will co-exist JISC Collections 39

3. SPEED, SPEED! JISC Collections 40 Slide 40

3. SPEED, SPEED! JISC Collections 40 Slide 40

Business Model Trials A study on the management and economic impact of etextbook business

Business Model Trials A study on the management and economic impact of etextbook business models on publishers, e-book aggregators and universities n Aim is to create realistic, simple and sustainable business models using real data from a range of access models n Reviewed the current e-textbook business model landscape n Selected a variety a trials following consultation with a range of stakeholders n Will include the ‘crown jewel’ e-textbooks n The trials will take place over a full academic year n The impacts on print sales, time and resource will be measured n Take account of the uneven and non-linear use JISC Collections 41

Licensing “… its very complex…you spend a lot of time trying to work out

Licensing “… its very complex…you spend a lot of time trying to work out exactly what you are being offered and what the terms and conditions would be and working out what would be the advantage to you, and the relative costs – so that takes up a lot of time” Future work: further develop the JISC model licence for e-books in light of findings and encourage widespread adoption of the JISC model licence by e-book aggregators and publishers. Make DRM more flexible to account for user behaviours and develop new licensing for E-book readers. JISC Collections 42

Standards “Publishers and aggregators should focus on providing libraries with quality metadata to ensure

Standards “Publishers and aggregators should focus on providing libraries with quality metadata to ensure discoverability in the places where staff and students go to find out what’s available” “Although the majority of statistics are COUNTER compliant, some librarians perceive that this adds little to their value, and may not help with comparisons across platforms due to the disparate COUNTER reports used by different publishers / e-book aggregators” Future work: redefine the essential and minimum standards that are required to ensure discoverability, allow all users to manipulate e-books according to their accessibility requirements and to allow easy evaluation of statistics JISC Collections 43

E-book design & platforms Current interfaces are inadequate, unusable and do not allows students

E-book design & platforms Current interfaces are inadequate, unusable and do not allows students and academics to use them how they need to for study and research Future work: use the data from the project to inform the development of e-books and e-book platforms to match actual user behaviour and to make them intuitive to use JISC Collections 44

Thank you c. milloy@jisc. ac. uk www. jiscebooksproject. org JISC Collections 45

Thank you c. [email protected] ac. uk www. jiscebooksproject. org JISC Collections 45

The Knowledge Exchange JISC Collections 46

The Knowledge Exchange JISC Collections 46

Introduction International collaboration between four countries: n United Kingdom n Germany n Denmark n

Introduction International collaboration between four countries: n United Kingdom n Germany n Denmark n Netherlands JISC Collections 47

Resources Five resources offered: n Wiley Blackwell e-books n Multi-Science n Bio. One n

Resources Five resources offered: n Wiley Blackwell e-books n Multi-Science n Bio. One n The. Scientific. World. JOURNAL n ALJC JISC Collections 48

Business models Three different business models: n Transnational opt-in n Transnational aggregation n National

Business models Three different business models: n Transnational opt-in n Transnational aggregation n National subscription JISC Collections 49

Business models Transnational opt-in n Institutions chose whether they want to subscribe n More

Business models Transnational opt-in n Institutions chose whether they want to subscribe n More subscriptions mean greater discounts JISC Collections 50

Business models Transnational aggregation n Institutions chose whether they want to subscribe n More

Business models Transnational aggregation n Institutions chose whether they want to subscribe n More subscriptions mean greater discounts JISC Collections 51

Business models National subscription n Subscriptions bought for all institutions at national level n

Business models National subscription n Subscriptions bought for all institutions at national level n More countries mean more discounts JISC Collections 52

Progress report n TSWJ most popular n Take up of Wiley e-books is good

Progress report n TSWJ most popular n Take up of Wiley e-books is good n Other resources not so popular JISC Collections 53

Thanks for listening Ben Taplin – B. Taplin@jisc. ac. uk JISC Collections 54

Thanks for listening Ben Taplin – B. [email protected] ac. uk JISC Collections 54

NESLi 2 SMP JISC Collections 55

NESLi 2 SMP JISC Collections 55

Why SMP? n NESLi 2 is one of the most successful strands of JISC

Why SMP? n NESLi 2 is one of the most successful strands of JISC Collections. n Average annual savings of over £ 3 million. n 18 publishers covered – around 6000 journals. Mainly “Big Deal”. n All major deals already accounted for. Focus on larger publishers, smaller ones overlooked. n Institutional demand for broader range of journals, more specialised packages. JISC Collections 56

Which publishers? Criteria for selection n NESLi 2 Model Licence. n Discounts off standard

Which publishers? Criteria for selection n NESLi 2 Model Licence. n Discounts off standard prices, JISC banding. n Membership of UKAMF, implementation of compliance technologies n COUNTER compliant. n Evaluation panel of academics, librarians, JISC Collections staff. n Launched with 13 publishers in 2008. Expanded to 18 in 2009. JISC Collections 57

Publishers n Australian Academic Press n American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) n Berg

Publishers n Australian Academic Press n American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) n Berg Publishing n Berkeley Electronic Press (Bepress) n Brill n Duke University n Expert Reviews (formerly Future. Drugs) n Future Medicine n Geological Society of America n Hart Publishing n IOS Press n Karger n Liverpool University Press n Multi-Science Publishing n Now Publishers n Royal Society of Medicine n SPIE n University of California Press JISC Collections 58

Benefits for institutions n Wider range of resources. n More specialised packages. n Security

Benefits for institutions n Wider range of resources. n More specialised packages. n Security of Model Licence. n Compliance with JISC Collections terms and conditions. JISC Collections 59

Benefits for publishers n Single channel to the UK higher and further education and

Benefits for publishers n Single channel to the UK higher and further education and research communities. n Standardised and efficient approach for offers and licences. n Association with the recognised branding of NESli 2 and the visibility that this provides. n Collection of subscription fees at an additional cost- if desired. JISC Collections 60

Progress report: Spring 2009 n 97% awareness and satisfaction, but … n No budget,

Progress report: Spring 2009 n 97% awareness and satisfaction, but … n No budget, no time n Not enough discounts n Agreements too complicated JISC Collections 61

For more information see http: //www. nesli 2. ac. uk/smp-information. html Ben Taplin –

For more information see http: //www. nesli 2. ac. uk/smp-information. html Ben Taplin – B. [email protected] ac. uk JISC Collections 62