Introduction to Sensory Processing Sensory Integration Sensory processing

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Introduction to Sensory Processing

Introduction to Sensory Processing

Sensory Integration Sensory processing (sometimes called "sensory integration" or SI) is a term that

Sensory Integration Sensory processing (sometimes called "sensory integration" or SI) is a term that refers to the way the nervous system receives messages from the senses and turns them into appropriate motor and behavioral responses. -Sensory Processing Foundation

SENSORY PROCESSING Neurological processes by which our bodies perceive, organize, manage and respond to

SENSORY PROCESSING Neurological processes by which our bodies perceive, organize, manage and respond to sensory stimuli. HEARING SIGHT SMELL VESTIBULAR PROPRIOCEPTIVE E TAST TOUCH

SIGHT the act or power of sensing with the eyes; sight

SIGHT the act or power of sensing with the eyes; sight

HEARING the faculty or sense by which sound is perceived

HEARING the faculty or sense by which sound is perceived

SMELL to perceive the odor or scent of through the nose by means of

SMELL to perceive the odor or scent of through the nose by means of the olfactory nerves

TOUCH to come into contact with and perceive (something)

TOUCH to come into contact with and perceive (something)

TASTE to sense the flavor of (something that you are eating or drinking)

TASTE to sense the flavor of (something that you are eating or drinking)

VESTIBULAR the perception of body position and movement

VESTIBULAR the perception of body position and movement

PROPRIOCEPTION the body’s ability to process information received from muscles and joints

PROPRIOCEPTION the body’s ability to process information received from muscles and joints

SENSORY PROCESSING DISORDER Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD, formerly known as "sensory integration dysfunction") is

SENSORY PROCESSING DISORDER Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD, formerly known as "sensory integration dysfunction") is a condition that exists when sensory signals don't get organized into appropriate responses. -Sensory Processing Foundation

Effects of Sensory Dysregulation • Cognitive counter-space full and impedes ability to learn •

Effects of Sensory Dysregulation • Cognitive counter-space full and impedes ability to learn • Disrupted sleep • Unable to plan and organize what to do to be productive and behave appropriately • Inefficient motor, language, or emotional output • Self-stimulatory behavior

VISUAL • • TRIPS OR FALLS BLINKS OR SQUINTS EYES PEERS FROM ONE EYE

VISUAL • • TRIPS OR FALLS BLINKS OR SQUINTS EYES PEERS FROM ONE EYE DISTRACTED BY VISUAL STIMULI

AUDITORY • • SENSITIVE TO SOUNDS MAKES UNUSUAL OR LOUD NOISES DISTRACTED BY BACKGROUND

AUDITORY • • SENSITIVE TO SOUNDS MAKES UNUSUAL OR LOUD NOISES DISTRACTED BY BACKGROUND NOISE COVERS EARS

OLFACTORY • ADVERSION TO ODORS • SMELLS ITEMS

OLFACTORY • ADVERSION TO ODORS • SMELLS ITEMS

TACTILE • DELAYED OR LACK OF PAIN • HITS OTHERS • DISLIKES OR OVERINDULGES

TACTILE • DELAYED OR LACK OF PAIN • HITS OTHERS • DISLIKES OR OVERINDULGES IN TEXTURES • REMOVES CLOTHING • DROPS OBJECTS • TOUCHES THE WALL/LEANS • MOUTHS OBJECTS • PICKY EATER • MESSY EATER • DIRTY MOUTH • SEEKS OUT HUGS

ORAL MOTOR GUSTATORY • • • BITES SELF OR OTHERS PICKY EATER OVERSTUFFS MOUTHS

ORAL MOTOR GUSTATORY • • • BITES SELF OR OTHERS PICKY EATER OVERSTUFFS MOUTHS OBJECTS MESSY EATER

VESTIBULAR • • • FALLS OUT OF CHAIR EXCESSIVE OR FAST MOVEMENTS ROCKS OR

VESTIBULAR • • • FALLS OUT OF CHAIR EXCESSIVE OR FAST MOVEMENTS ROCKS OR LUNGES BANGS HEADS SPINS SELF

PROPRIOCEPTIVE • • • HITS, TOUCHES, OR BITES OTHERS DROPS OBJECTS BREAKS TOYS FALLS

PROPRIOCEPTIVE • • • HITS, TOUCHES, OR BITES OTHERS DROPS OBJECTS BREAKS TOYS FALLS OUT OF CHAIR PREFERS TIGHT SPACES TRIPS OR FALLS SEEKS HUGS SELF INJURIOUS ROCKS OR LUNGES

Cindy Lee, M. S. Ed

Cindy Lee, M. S. Ed

Strategies to Manage Sensory Interference • • DO Allow the student to initiate actions

Strategies to Manage Sensory Interference • • DO Allow the student to initiate actions that may elicit a negative reaction. Teach the student a way to signal express the need for a break. Plan activities or transitions that incorporate sensory input. Provide an appropriate replacement behavior when you observe self-stimulatory behaviors. • • DON’T Always avoid exposure to noxious stimuli. Force a student to “tolerate” noxious stimuli. Assume what constitutes “fun”. Communicate what “NOT” to do as the only option.

OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY Julie Huckabee, OTR/L huckabeejc@spart 6. org Mary Beth Bright, OTR/L mbbright@spart 6.

OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY Julie Huckabee, OTR/L [email protected] 6. org Mary Beth Bright, OTR/L [email protected] 6. org Marci Bowen, COTA/L [email protected] 6. org Vonda Bates, COTA/L [email protected] 6. org District 6 Child Development Center 3050 North Blackstock Rd Spartanburg, SC 29301 576 -4886