Inorganic Chemistry Lab 1 PPE Personal Protective Equipment

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Inorganic Chemistry Lab

Inorganic Chemistry Lab

1. PPE Personal Protective Equipment: What must be worn when you work in the

1. PPE Personal Protective Equipment: What must be worn when you work in the laboratory. Eye Protection Lab Coat Long Pants Closed Toed Shoes and Socks– no exposed skin around feet Lab gloves – when required 2

Eye Protection • Contact lenses are OK as long as glasses/goggles are worn •

Eye Protection • Contact lenses are OK as long as glasses/goggles are worn • Prescription glasses – you must wear goggles over them • Safety goggles are provided in organic labs in UV irradiating cabinets • Eye wash stations are present in all labs 3

Clothing and Foot Protection • Clothing must cover all exposed skin including legs/ankles •

Clothing and Foot Protection • Clothing must cover all exposed skin including legs/ankles • Socks as required PPE • Stockings or leggings do not provide good coverage • Sandals, flip-flops, Crocs, opentoe and open-top (i. e. ballet flat) shoes and canvas shoes (i. e. Toms) are not appropriate. These are not going to protect your feet if you drop a piece of glass with a liquid chemical reagent in it. 4

Use of Gloves Remove gloves before handling objects such as doorknobs, telephones, pens, computer

Use of Gloves Remove gloves before handling objects such as doorknobs, telephones, pens, computer keyboards, p. H meter or other electronic buttons, or phones while in lab. It might be convenient to have one gloved hand one ungloved hand to do procedures where these kinds of things are used. • Throw away gloves anytime you take them off. • You should expect to use several pairs of gloves in any given lab period. • Glove video 5

Glove Recycling Contaminated Gloves with visible signs of chemical exposure or those used with

Glove Recycling Contaminated Gloves with visible signs of chemical exposure or those used with hazardous substances should be collected in solid waste or biohazard containers. Uncontaminated Gloves that have no visible sign of chemical exposure or residue can be placed in the glove recycling container. If there’s any questions or the boxes need attention, please contact Dr. Katherine Mullaugh. Email: [email protected] edu Phone: 843. 953. 6587 6

Eyewash / Safety Shower The eyewash is on the left. Pull the handle and

Eyewash / Safety Shower The eyewash is on the left. Pull the handle and a fountain of water will appear that you can use to bathe your eyes. The safety shower is on the right. Pull the handle and water will start spraying from the shower head on the ceiling. There’s no drain in the floor – we only do this in emergencies, because a flood of water will have to be cleaned up. 7

Eye Wash 8

Eye Wash 8

Using the Fume Hoods properly This window/bar is called the sash. If this is

Using the Fume Hoods properly This window/bar is called the sash. If this is not saying NORMAL, then the hood is not protecting you. Keeping the sash and sliding panels in proper position keeps this NORMAL, otherwise the alarm goes off. If the alarm goes off, you need to reposition things to the correct positions, then press the “mute” button to reset the controller. The sash should never be raised above the green “operation” level when you 9 are working in the hood.

In use, side-to-side panel used as shield Closed, not in use ✓ In use,

In use, side-to-side panel used as shield Closed, not in use ✓ In use, sash (window) raised to less than 18 inches ✓ ✓ Don’t open side shields to make one big window. × 10

 • When using a laboratory hood, Check that the airflow is in the

• When using a laboratory hood, Check that the airflow is in the normal range on the digital display • Turn on the hood light • Set the equipment and chemicals back at least 6 inches. • Never lean in and/or put your head in the hood when you are working. This is worse than doing the experiment with no hood at all. • It’s a good idea to put liquid reagent containers in trays to catch all spills and drips 11

Fire Alarms – know the location of one close to your lab 12

Fire Alarms – know the location of one close to your lab 12

Fire Extinguishers – we have several in the labs and in the hallways. 13

Fire Extinguishers – we have several in the labs and in the hallways. 13

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Types of Fire Extinguishers This is a special fire extinguisher for combustible metal fires.

Types of Fire Extinguishers This is a special fire extinguisher for combustible metal fires. It is a type D fire extinguisher. You won’t need to use this unless you work in a research lab with combustible metals. Most of our fire extinguishers are ABC. It contains a dry powder to put out the kinds of fires we might encounter in the chemistry labs where we have class. 15

Student Reaction in a Fire Although we want you to be informed on the

Student Reaction in a Fire Although we want you to be informed on the operation of a fire extinguisher, we do not expect you to use it. If a fire is ignited in your area, the proper STUDENT response is to: 1) Notify everyone in the room 2) If possible shutdown any reaction in progress by removing heat/energy source 3) Proceed to the nearest exit and pull the nearest fire alarm 4) Evacuate the building 5) Assemble in front of the library or in the YWCA parking lot for a positive headcount 16

Keep your lab area clean. × Throw away used paper towels and used gloves,

Keep your lab area clean. × Throw away used paper towels and used gloves, immediately. × Don’t block the floor in front of the eyewash/shower station. × Don’t leave cords dangling because someone will trip over them. × Don’t leave things in the floor because someone will trip over it. 17

Injury procedure, continued • First Aid kits are available in the lab with band

Injury procedure, continued • First Aid kits are available in the lab with band aids and other items for treating small cuts and burns. • Campus public safety can be reached at 35609 for non-emergencies. • If it is a serious injury, call 911 for emergencies. • The Live. Safe app can also be used to report emergencies and non-emergencies. 18

Cryogens • Cryogens: liquefied gases that are kept in their liquid state at very

Cryogens • Cryogens: liquefied gases that are kept in their liquid state at very low temperatures. • Used to access low temperatures • Boiling points below -150°C (- 238°F) • High expansion ratios (average 700: 1) • When they are heated (room temperature) they vaporize very rapidly – If volume cannot be expanded, the pressure will increase and possibly blow something up

Handling Cryogens • Know the properties of the cryogens before handling them • Examine

Handling Cryogens • Know the properties of the cryogens before handling them • Examine equipment before use • Many materials shrink, become brittle, or crack at such low temperatures, so take care when selecting materials to be used with cryogens. • Spilled cryogens can expand to gas rapidly and displace air in enclosed areas

Handling Cryogens • If using cryogens to cool an object, insert the object slowly

Handling Cryogens • If using cryogens to cool an object, insert the object slowly using tongs – this minimizes boiling and splashing • Jewelry can freeze to exposed skin • Exposure can cause severe frostbite • Always wear proper PPE that covers Legs, feet, and arms, safety glasses or Face shield and thermal gloves

Report any concerns • If you have any safety concerns about the lab you

Report any concerns • If you have any safety concerns about the lab you are working in or the people working around you, you can contact: 1. To your instructor 2. Dr. Marcello Forconi– Head of the departmental safety committee 3. Dr. Pamela Riggs-Gelasco – Department Chair for Chemistry and Biochemistry 4. Dr. Jim Deavor, Associate Dean of the School of Science and Mathematics. 22