Injunctions Oneclick to e Bay Patent Law Prof

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Injunctions: “One-click” to e. Bay Patent Law Prof Merges – 11. 6. 2012

Injunctions: “One-click” to e. Bay Patent Law Prof Merges – 11. 6. 2012

Relief Prospective Effect Issuance Complaint filed in District Court Damages assessed for this period

Relief Prospective Effect Issuance Complaint filed in District Court Damages assessed for this period if marking (or actual notice) Preliminary injunction hearing Final injunction issues

35 USC § 283. Injunctive relief. The several courts having jurisdiction of cases under

35 USC § 283. Injunctive relief. The several courts having jurisdiction of cases under this title may grant injunctions in accordance with the principles of equity to prevent the violation of any right secured by patent, on such terms as the court deems reasonable.

Merc. Exchange, L. L. C. , holds a number of patents, including a business

Merc. Exchange, L. L. C. , holds a number of patents, including a business method patent for an electronic market designed to facilitate the sale of goods between private individuals by establishing a central authority to promote trust among participants. See U. S. Patent No. 5, 845, 265.

United States Patent 5, 845, 265 Woolston December 1, 1998 “Consignment nodes” Abstract A

United States Patent 5, 845, 265 Woolston December 1, 1998 “Consignment nodes” Abstract A method and apparatus for creating a computerized market for used and collectible goods by use of a plurality of low cost posting terminals and a market maker computer in a legal framework that establishes a bailee relationship and consignment contract with a purchaser of a good. . . in an electronic market for used goods while assuring the safe and trusted physical possession of a good with a vetted bailee. Inventors: Woolston; Thomas G. (Arlington, VA) Assignee: Merc. Exchange, L. L. C. (Alexandria, VA) Filed: November 7, 1995

1. A system for presenting a data record of a good for sale to

1. A system for presenting a data record of a good for sale to a market for goods, said market for goods having an interface to a wide area communication network for presenting and offering goods for sale to a purchaser, a payment clearing means for processing a purchase request from said purchaser, a database means for storing and tracking said data record of said good for sale, a communications means for communicating with said system to accept said data record of said good and a payment means for transferring funds to a user of said system, said system comprising:

a digital image means for creating a digital image of a good for sale;

a digital image means for creating a digital image of a good for sale; a user interface for receiving textual information from a user; a bar code scanner; a bar code printer; a storage device; a communications means for communicating with the market; and

a computer locally connected to said [other elements] said computer adapted to receive said

a computer locally connected to said [other elements] said computer adapted to receive said digital image of said good for sale from said digital image means, generate a data record of said good for sale, incorporate said digital image of said good for sale into said data record, receive a textual description of said good for sale from said user interface, store said data record on said storage device, transfer said data record to the market for goods via said communications means and receive a tracking number for said good for sale from the market for goods via said communications means, store said tracking number … printing a bar code from said tracking number on said bar code printer.

 • A jury found that Merc. Exchange's patent was valid, that e. Bay

• A jury found that Merc. Exchange's patent was valid, that e. Bay and Half. com had infringed that patent, and that an award of damages was appropriate.

e. Bay v. Merc. Exchange • Trial court • Federal Circuit • Supreme Court

e. Bay v. Merc. Exchange • Trial court • Federal Circuit • Supreme Court

e. Bay v. Merc. Exchange • Merc. Exchange, LLC v. e. Bay, Inc. ,

e. Bay v. Merc. Exchange • Merc. Exchange, LLC v. e. Bay, Inc. , 401 F. 3 d 1323 (Fed. Cir. 2005) – “Automatic injunction” rule: after patentee wins case, injunction will automatically issue

Federal Circuit opinion “Because the ‘right to exclude recognized in a patent is but

Federal Circuit opinion “Because the ‘right to exclude recognized in a patent is but the essence of the concept of property, ’ the general rule is that a permanent injunction will issue once infringement and validity have been adjudged. ” -- 401 F. 3 d 1323, 1338

401 F. 3 d 1323, 1339 “A general concern regarding business-method patents, however, is

401 F. 3 d 1323, 1339 “A general concern regarding business-method patents, however, is not the type of important public need that justifies the unusual step of denying injunctive relief. ” “If the injunction gives the patentee additional leverage in licensing, that is a natural consequence of the right to exclude and not an inappropriate reward to a party that does not intend to compete in the marketplace with potential infringers. ”

Supreme Court • Reversed Federal Circuit • Rejected “automatic rule” • Reimposed historical standard

Supreme Court • Reversed Federal Circuit • Rejected “automatic rule” • Reimposed historical standard

The 4 Part Test: For permanent injunction Plaintiff must show – (1) [T]hat it

The 4 Part Test: For permanent injunction Plaintiff must show – (1) [T]hat it has suffered an irreparable injury; (2) that remedies available at law, such as monetary damages, are inadequate to compensate for that injury; (3) that, considering the balance of hardships between the plaintiff and defendant, a remedy in equity is warranted; and (4) that the public interest would not be disserved by a permanent injunction.

Remedies: Injunctions Preliminary Injunction -- 4 Factors: 1. Reasonable likelihood of success 2. Irreparable

Remedies: Injunctions Preliminary Injunction -- 4 Factors: 1. Reasonable likelihood of success 2. Irreparable harm 3. Balance of hardships 4. Impact on public interest

Supreme Court opinion Like the Patent Act, the Copyright Act provides that courts "may"

Supreme Court opinion Like the Patent Act, the Copyright Act provides that courts "may" grant injunctive relief "on such terms as it may deem reasonable to prevent or restrain infringement of a copyright. " 17 U. S. C. § 502(a).

What was wrong with the district court test? “[I]t appeared to adopt certain expansive

What was wrong with the district court test? “[I]t appeared to adopt certain expansive principles suggesting that injunctive relief could not issue in a broad swath of cases. Most notably, it concluded that a “plaintiff’s willingness to license its patents” and “its lack of commercial activity in practicing the patents” … But traditional equitable principles do not permit such broad classifications. ”

What was wrong with the Federal Circuit test? Too mechanical: “[T]he Court of Appeals

What was wrong with the Federal Circuit test? Too mechanical: “[T]he Court of Appeals departed in the opposite direction from the four-factor test. The court articulated a “general rule, ” unique to patent disputes… Just as the District Court erred in its categorical denial of injunctive relief, the Court of Appeals erred in its categorical grant of such relief.

[S]ome patent holders, such as university researchers or self-made inventors, might reasonably prefer to

[S]ome patent holders, such as university researchers or self-made inventors, might reasonably prefer to license their patents, rather than undertake efforts to secure the financing necessary to bring their works to market themselves. Such patent holders may be able to satisfy the traditional fourfactor test, and we see no basis for categorically denying them the opportunity to do so.

We hold only that the decision whether to grant or deny injunctive relief rests

We hold only that the decision whether to grant or deny injunctive relief rests within the equitable discretion of the district courts, and that such discretion must be exercised consistent with traditional principles of equity, in patent disputes no less than in other cases governed by such standards.

Concurrences “[T]here is a difference between exercising equitable discretion pursuant to the established fourfactor

Concurrences “[T]here is a difference between exercising equitable discretion pursuant to the established fourfactor test and writing on an entirely clean slate. ” – Roberts, Scalia & Ginsburg, concurring

Kennedy, Stevens, Souter & Breyer The lesson of the historical practice, therefore, is most

Kennedy, Stevens, Souter & Breyer The lesson of the historical practice, therefore, is most helpful and instructive when the circumstances of a case bear substantial parallels to litigation the courts have confronted before.

An industry has developed in which firms use patents not as a basis for

An industry has developed in which firms use patents not as a basis for producing and selling goods but, instead, primarily for obtaining licensing fees. For these firms, an injunction, and the potentially serious sanctions arising from its violation, can be employed as a bargaining tool to charge exorbitant fees…

When the patented invention is but a small component of the product the companies

When the patented invention is but a small component of the product the companies seek to produce and the threat of an injunction is employed simply for undue leverage in negotiations, legal damages may well be sufficient to compensate for the infringement and an injunction may not serve the public interest.

NY Times – Op Ed 3. 22. 06 Patently Ridiculous [P]rofiteers, including lawyers and

NY Times – Op Ed 3. 22. 06 Patently Ridiculous [P]rofiteers, including lawyers and hedge funds, have turned the very purpose of patent rights — to encourage people to invent and produce — on its head, using them to tax, blackmail and even shut down productive companies unless they pay high enough ransoms. These so-called patent trolls have emerged as the villains in this intellectual property debate. The Supreme Court now appears ready to weigh in and — we hope — restore some sanity to the system.

Post-e. Bay “Scorecard” IP Today has published an interesting report on permanent injunction decisions

Post-e. Bay “Scorecard” IP Today has published an interesting report on permanent injunction decisions since the Supreme Court's 2006 decision in e. Bay v. Merc. Exchange. The authors found 67 district court injunction decisions. 48 (72%) granted relief; 19 (28%) denied relief. – Patently-O Nov. 17, 2009

Preliminary injunctions • The Amazon. com story • “One-click” ordering patent

Preliminary injunctions • The Amazon. com story • “One-click” ordering patent

‘ 411 Patent ABSTRACT: A method and system for placing an order to purchase

‘ 411 Patent ABSTRACT: A method and system for placing an order to purchase an item via the Internet. The order is placed by a purchaser at a client system and received by a server system. The server system receives purchaser information including identification of the purchaser, payment information, and shipment information from the client system. The server system then assigns a client identifier to the client system and associates the assigned client identifier with the received purchaser information. The server system sends to the client system the assigned client identifier and an HTML document identifying the item and including an order button. . In response to the selection of the order button, the client system sends to the server system a request to purchase the identified item. The server system receives the request and combines the purchaser information associated with the client identifier of the client system to generate an order to purchase the item in accordance with the billing and shipment information whereby the purchaser effects the ordering of the product by selection of the order button.

US Patent 5, 960, 411 1. A method of placing an order for an

US Patent 5, 960, 411 1. A method of placing an order for an item comprising: under control of a client system, displaying information identifying the item; and in response to only a single action being performed, sending a request to order the item along with an identifier of a purchaser of the item to a server system …

retrieving additional information previously stored for the purchaser identified by the identifier in the

retrieving additional information previously stored for the purchaser identified by the identifier in the received request; and generating an order to purchase the requested item for the purchaser identified by the identifier in the received request using the retrieved additional information; and fulfilling the generated order to complete purchase of the item whereby the item is ordered without using a shopping cart ordering model.

US Patent 5, 960, 411 9. A server system for generating an order comprising:

US Patent 5, 960, 411 9. A server system for generating an order comprising: a shopping cart ordering component; and a single-action ordering component including:

a data storage medium storing information for a plurality of users; a receiving component

a data storage medium storing information for a plurality of users; a receiving component for receiving requests to order an item, a request including an indication of one of the plurality of users, the request being sent in response to only a single action being performed; and

an order placement component that retrieves from the data storage medium information for the

an order placement component that retrieves from the data storage medium information for the indicated user and that uses the retrieved information to place an order for the indicated user for the item; and an order fulfillment component that completes a purchase of the item in accordance with the order placed by the single-action ordering component.

US Patent 5, 960, 411 10. The server system of claim 9 wherein the

US Patent 5, 960, 411 10. The server system of claim 9 wherein the request is sent by a client system in response to a single action being performed.

What it Boils Down To: The client system [i. e. , user’s or customer’s

What it Boils Down To: The client system [i. e. , user’s or customer’s computer] is provided with an identifier that identifies a customer [in a file permanently stored on customer’s computer, e. g. , a “Cookie” file]. The client system displays information [about an item to purchase]. [After the customer indicates he or she wants to buy something, ] the client system sends to a server system the provided identifier and a request to order the identified item. The server system uses the identifier to identify additional information needed to generate an order for the item and then generates the order. -- from specification

Claim 1 Express Lane Buy it now with just 1 click! A method of

Claim 1 Express Lane Buy it now with just 1 click! A method of placing an order for an item comprising: under control of a client system, displaying information identifying the item; and in response to only a single action being performed, sending a request to order the item along with an identifier of a purchaser of the item to a server system; under control of a single-action ordering component of the server system; receiving the request; retrieving additional information previously stored for the purchaser. . . ; and generating an order to purchase the requested item. . . fulfilling the generated order. . . whereby the item is ordered without using a shopping cart ordering model. • validity? • infringement?

The Wall Street Journal, Friday, December 3, 1999 Amazon. com Is Granted an Injunction

The Wall Street Journal, Friday, December 3, 1999 Amazon. com Is Granted an Injunction In barnesandnoble. com Patent Dispute By Scott Thurm and Rebecca Quick A federal district judge in Seattle granted Amazon. com Inc. a preliminary injunction in a patent dispute, barring rival barnesandnoble. com Inc. from using a one-click system for online orders. U. S. District Judge Marsha J. Pechman late Wednesday ordered barnesandnoble. com to stop using its Express Lane service by tomorrow.

WSJ, cont’d In her ruling, Judge Pechman said barnesandnoble. com could avoid infringing on

WSJ, cont’d In her ruling, Judge Pechman said barnesandnoble. com could avoid infringing on Amazon. com's patent "by simply requiring users to take an additional action to confirm orders placed by using Express Lane. "

Reference 1 Compu. Serve Information Manager Price Volume Graph

Reference 1 Compu. Serve Information Manager Price Volume Graph

Reference 2 http: //www. morwood. net/web-basket/ Web-Basket Web-basket is a Linux-based software package for

Reference 2 http: //www. morwood. net/web-basket/ Web-Basket Web-basket is a Linux-based software package for e-commerce on the World Wide Web. This software provides an efficient mechanism for maintaining user accounts, inventory, and orders placed through the World Wide Web. Dr. John Lockwood August 1996 The Internet Engineering Task Force Draft Cookie Specification a text file that is stored on your hard drive that tells the Web server about you, your computer, and your activities.

Reference 3 © 1996 Appendix F Instant Buy Option Merchants also can provide shoppers

Reference 3 © 1996 Appendix F Instant Buy Option Merchants also can provide shoppers with an Instant Buy button for some or all items, enabling them to skip check out review. This provides added appeal for customers who already know the single item they want to purchase during their shopping excursion.

Reference 4 A single click on its picture is all it takes to order

Reference 4 A single click on its picture is all it takes to order an item. [O]ur solution allows one-click ordering anywhere you see a product picture or a price. A user’s identifying and purchasing information is captured and stored “the very first time a user clicks on an item to order. ”

Federal Circuit holding • District court erred in ignoring Compuserve Trend prior art –

Federal Circuit holding • District court erred in ignoring Compuserve Trend prior art – Creates doubt about Amazon’s “reasonable likelihood of success on the merits” • Does this mean Amazon patent is invalid? – Subsequent settlement. . .

“Public Interest” Element • Federal Circuit had in the past usually identified public interest

“Public Interest” Element • Federal Circuit had in the past usually identified public interest with patent enforcement • Some exceptions. . . • Obviously changed post-e. Bay

BUT – [e. Bay] does not swing the pendulum in the opposite direction. .

BUT – [e. Bay] does not swing the pendulum in the opposite direction. . [C]ourts should [not] entirely ignore the fundamental nature of patents as property rights granting the owner the right to exclude. . While the patentee’s right to exclude alone cannot justify an injunction, it should not be ignored either. – Slip op. , 10 -11

Apple v. Samsung 2012 WL 4820601, (Fed Cir. Oct. 11, 2012) District court abused

Apple v. Samsung 2012 WL 4820601, (Fed Cir. Oct. 11, 2012) District court abused its discretion in determining that patentee sufficiently established causal nexus between alleged irreparable harm and alleged infringement of patented unified search feature.

Unified search feature When the user inputs a search query in the unified search

Unified search feature When the user inputs a search query in the unified search interface, the query is submitted to different heuristic modules, each of which is assigned a predetermined search area. The search results that are returned by the search modules are then gathered (and perhaps further filtered) and displayed to the user

Figure 2

Figure 2

6. An apparatus for locating information in a network, comprising … a plurality of

6. An apparatus for locating information in a network, comprising … a plurality of heuristic modules configured to search for information … each heuristic module corresponds to a respective area of search and employs a different, predetermined heuristic algorithm corresponding to said respective area… and a display module configured to display one or more candidate items of information located by the plurality of heuristic modules on a display device.

Samsung Galaxy Nexus

Samsung Galaxy Nexus

Galaxy nexus “quick search box”

Galaxy nexus “quick search box”

District court granted injunction • Judge Koh: The patent is likely to be valid,

District court granted injunction • Judge Koh: The patent is likely to be valid, and infringed Samsung products may harm Apple’s market

Federal Circuit opinion • Burden is on Apple to prove “irreparable injury” under e.

Federal Circuit opinion • Burden is on Apple to prove “irreparable injury” under e. Bay. Citing Apple, Inc. v. Samsung Electronics Co. , 678 F. 3 d 1314, 1325 (Fed. Cir. 2012) (related case involving different patent) • BUT: there is an additional requirement

“But in cases such as this—where the accused product includes many features of which

“But in cases such as this—where the accused product includes many features of which only one (or a small minority) infringe—a finding that the patentee will be at risk of irreparable harm does not alone justify injunctive relief. Rather, the patentee must also establish that the harm is sufficiently related to the infringement. ” -- 2012 WL 4820601, at *2

[I]t may very well be that the accused product would sell almost as well

[I]t may very well be that the accused product would sell almost as well without incorporating the patented feature. And in that case, even if the competitive injury that results from selling the accused device is substantial, the harm that flows from the alleged infringement (the only harm that should count) is not.

Thus, the causal nexus inquiry is indeed part of the irreparable harm calculus: it

Thus, the causal nexus inquiry is indeed part of the irreparable harm calculus: it informs whether the patentee's allegations of irreparable harm are pertinent to the injunctive relief analysis, or whether the patentee seeks to leverage its patent for competitive gain beyond that which the inventive contribution and value of the patent warrant. -- *3

Harvard Univ. Press 2011

Harvard Univ. Press 2011

Chapter 6 • The Proportionality Principle in IP Law

Chapter 6 • The Proportionality Principle in IP Law