Industrial Revolution Objective Describe why the Industrial Revolution

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Industrial Revolution Objective: Describe why the Industrial Revolution began in Britain. Essential Question: What

Industrial Revolution Objective: Describe why the Industrial Revolution began in Britain. Essential Question: What factors led to the beginning of the Industrial Revolution in Britain?

Life before the IR • • Relied solely on farming in small country villages

Life before the IR • • Relied solely on farming in small country villages Life is short and harsh Everything they had, they made Early industries – wool and cotton • Domestic system – produced in homes • Patriot Clip

Advantages/Disadvantages • With your group, write down the possible advantages and disadvantages of the

Advantages/Disadvantages • With your group, write down the possible advantages and disadvantages of the domestic system • Consider: Work Load, Supervision, Amount of Production, Social Interaction

 • What happens when the growing industry becomes too large for people to

• What happens when the growing industry becomes too large for people to use their homes? ?

Industrial Revolution • The developments that changed rural, agricultural societies into city-centered and industrialized

Industrial Revolution • The developments that changed rural, agricultural societies into city-centered and industrialized societies • ***Factory system – manufacturing goods in a central location

Factory life during the Industrial Revolution

Factory life during the Industrial Revolution

The Factory System × Rigid schedule. × 12 -14 hour day. × Dangerous conditions.

The Factory System × Rigid schedule. × 12 -14 hour day. × Dangerous conditions. × Mind-numbing monotony.

. . more child labor

. . more child labor

Young Coal Miners

Young Coal Miners

Child Labor in the Mines Child “hurriers”

Child Labor in the Mines Child “hurriers”

Workers on an assembly line

Workers on an assembly line

The New Industrial City

The New Industrial City

Early-19 c London by Gustave Dore

Early-19 c London by Gustave Dore

Worker Housing in Manchester

Worker Housing in Manchester

Modern Times Clip • http: //www. youtube. com/watch? v=CRe. DRHDYhk 8

Modern Times Clip • http: //www. youtube. com/watch? v=CRe. DRHDYhk 8

Advantages/Disadvantages • With your group, write down some of the possible advantages and disadvantages

Advantages/Disadvantages • With your group, write down some of the possible advantages and disadvantages of the factory system • Consider: Work Load, Supervision, Amount of Production, Social Interaction

Industrial Revolution • Great Britain leads the way – WHY? • Enclosure Movement –

Industrial Revolution • Great Britain leads the way – WHY? • Enclosure Movement – landowners fence off and take over lands, farmers must move to cities to find work • Landowners use new, more efficient farming methods • Mix soils, crop rotation, seed drill – agricultural revolution • Capital – people have more $ to invest in labor, machines, materials

IR • Natural resources • Water, iron, coal • Large labor supply – increase

IR • Natural resources • Water, iron, coal • Large labor supply – increase in population of workers • Farming = more food = longer lives • Entrepreneurs – business people set up industries • Political Stability – many wars but none on British soil, successful

Spread of Industry • GB tried to keep innovations a secret • France –

Spread of Industry • GB tried to keep innovations a secret • France – many scientists • Slow paced, Napoleonic Wars, compensation • Germany – new factories, 1 st major railway, gov’t funding • U. S. – combined British $ and machinery with American mechanical skills • Had natural resources and large labor supply (immigrants)

Top 3 Most Industrialized Countries • Great Britain • Germany • U. S.

Top 3 Most Industrialized Countries • Great Britain • Germany • U. S.

A New Society • Factory System (manufacturing goods in a central location, brought workers

A New Society • Factory System (manufacturing goods in a central location, brought workers and machines under one roof) brought people to cities – URBANIZATION • Living conditions – poor housing, education, police protection, unpaved roads, disease rampant • Class tensions – IR created great wealth for the upper class and more of a gap

Objective: Describe how different schools of thoughts explain poverty and propose to solve it.

Objective: Describe how different schools of thoughts explain poverty and propose to solve it. Essential Question: What new schools of thoughts emerged as a result of the Industrial Revolution?

An Unequal Distribution of Wealth • Middle Class – skilled workers, factory owners, business

An Unequal Distribution of Wealth • Middle Class – skilled workers, factory owners, business people • Not just bankers, doctors, lawyers • Easier to change position in life • Lifestyle – men work, women at home • Working Class • As competition increased, work is harder, assigned more machines, must perform as fast as possible • Division of labor – assigned a specific task • Women and children work • 14 hr days/6 days a week, factories not well-lit or clean, no aid

“Working People of the World Unite!” Communism • Founders: Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels

“Working People of the World Unite!” Communism • Founders: Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels • Published 1848 pamphlet titled The Communist Manifesto • View of history: history is the story of class struggles (rich vs. poor, lord vs. serf, business owner vs. factory worker) • Anti-capitalism – the working class has primarily gained hardship and toil in the Industrial Revolution. • Business owners have too much power by controlling the factors of production: land, labor (workers) and capital (money/tools). • It is inevitable that the proletariat (working class) will overthrow the bourgeoisie (middle-class business owners) and establish a classless society. • Warm-up question: What would a classless society look like? (2 -3 sent. )

Other Schools of Thought • Capitalism (laissez-faire) • Described and supported by Adam Smith

Other Schools of Thought • Capitalism (laissez-faire) • Described and supported by Adam Smith in The Wealth of Nations (1776) • Government should not interfere in the economy. Placing trust in the law of supply and demand will benefit everyone. Laissez-faire literally translates to “leave it alone. ” • Utilitarianism: Government’s job is to provide the greatest good for the greatest number of people. • Socialism: government should control a country’s means of production (land, labor, capital) • Similar to Communism, but less extreme • Labor Unions: groups of workers joining together to fight/bargain for better pay, hours and working conditions

A New Society (cont) • Unions – Late 1800 s • Organized labor groups

A New Society (cont) • Unions – Late 1800 s • Organized labor groups representing the interests of workers in a specific industry • Improve wages and working conditions of members

Positive Effects • • Produce goods faster and cheaper Increased life expectancy (eventually) Increased

Positive Effects • • Produce goods faster and cheaper Increased life expectancy (eventually) Increased education (eventually) New jobs Unions Technology Coal to heat homes, better food Better lives for some

Negative Effects • Widened gap b/w industrialized and non-industrialized countries • Imperialism – taking

Negative Effects • Widened gap b/w industrialized and non-industrialized countries • Imperialism – taking over other countries • Dependence on nonrenewable resources • Overcrowding, pollution, poor living conditions for the lower classes