Identifying the Elements of A Plot Diagram Review

  • Slides: 26
Download presentation
Identifying the Elements of A Plot Diagram Review

Identifying the Elements of A Plot Diagram Review

Plot Diagram 3 2 1 4 5

Plot Diagram 3 2 1 4 5

Plot (definition) • Plot is the organized pattern or sequence of events that make

Plot (definition) • Plot is the organized pattern or sequence of events that make up a story. Every plot is made up of a series of incidents that are related to one another.

1. Exposition • This usually occurs at the beginning of a short story. Here

1. Exposition • This usually occurs at the beginning of a short story. Here the characters are introduced. We also learn about the setting of the story. Most importantly, we are introduced to the main conflict (main problem).

Setting • The setting describes where an when the story takes place. • It

Setting • The setting describes where an when the story takes place. • It helps build background and create images in the mind. • It helps set the tone or mood of the story. Details can describe: ü Time of day ü Time of year ü Time in History ü Scenery ü Weather ü Location Walsh Publishing Co. 2009

External vs. Internal External Conflict takes place outside of the body Internal Conflict takes

External vs. Internal External Conflict takes place outside of the body Internal Conflict takes place inside of the body/mind

MOOD Mood, or atmosphere, is the feeling created in the reader by a literary

MOOD Mood, or atmosphere, is the feeling created in the reader by a literary work or passage.

2. Rising Action • This part of the story begins to develop the conflict(s).

2. Rising Action • This part of the story begins to develop the conflict(s). A building of interest or suspense occurs.

3. Climax • This is the turning point of the story. Usually the main

3. Climax • This is the turning point of the story. Usually the main character comes face to face with a conflict. The main character will change in some way.

4. Falling Action • All loose ends of the plot are tied up. The

4. Falling Action • All loose ends of the plot are tied up. The conflict(s) and climax are taken care of.

5. Resolution • The story comes to a reasonable ending.

5. Resolution • The story comes to a reasonable ending.

Putting It All Together 1. Exposition 2. Rising Action 3. Climax 4. Falling Action

Putting It All Together 1. Exposition 2. Rising Action 3. Climax 4. Falling Action 5. Resolution Beginning of Story Middle of Story End of Story

Other Literary Terms

Other Literary Terms

Definitions • Foreshadowing: when an author mentions or hints at something that will happen

Definitions • Foreshadowing: when an author mentions or hints at something that will happen later in the story

Hint • Try breaking the word FORESHADOWING apart. • FORE means ahead. • A

Hint • Try breaking the word FORESHADOWING apart. • FORE means ahead. • A SHADOW is a glimpse of something without the complete details.

A hint about what will happen next is called foreshadowing For example, if you

A hint about what will happen next is called foreshadowing For example, if you hear this: Then you know someone’s about to get eaten!

Definitions • Flashback: when an author refers back to something that already took place

Definitions • Flashback: when an author refers back to something that already took place in the story

Hint • Now try breaking the word FLASHBACK apart. • FLASH: a quick glimpse.

Hint • Now try breaking the word FLASHBACK apart. • FLASH: a quick glimpse. • BACK: a look back in the story at something that previously happened.

The movie Titanic is told almost entirely in a flashback. What are some other

The movie Titanic is told almost entirely in a flashback. What are some other films that contain flashback to help tell stories? Holes Up

An Example… • And now you will see portions from the well known children’s

An Example… • And now you will see portions from the well known children’s story Little Red Riding Hood.

Little Red Riding Hood • Once upon a time, there was a little girl

Little Red Riding Hood • Once upon a time, there was a little girl who lived with her mother. Her mother asked her to take her old and lonely grandmother some food one day. "Don't stop along the way. Go straight to your Grandma's house and back. Don't talk to any strangers and watch out for the wolf in the woods! Now get along!" Foreshadowing

Foreshadowing • The first set of underlined words is an example of foreshadowing. Little

Foreshadowing • The first set of underlined words is an example of foreshadowing. Little Red Riding Hood’s mother is warning her about the wolf in the woods, which hints at what may happen next.

Little Red Riding Hood • While she was walking through the woods, a wolf

Little Red Riding Hood • While she was walking through the woods, a wolf was walking past her. "I bet I could convince her to take the long way. Then I could get to her grandmother's house first and trick her into thinking that I was her grandma. That way I could have her and her grandma for a large feast, ” he thought.

Little Red Riding Hood • The wolf went up to Little Red Riding Hood

Little Red Riding Hood • The wolf went up to Little Red Riding Hood and told her that he knew a shortcut. Little Red Riding Hood thought back to what her mother told her. “Don’t talk to any strangers and watch out for the wolf in the woods!” But it was too late, she had already listened to the wolf’s directions. Flashback

Flashback • The second set of underlined words is an example of flashback. Little

Flashback • The second set of underlined words is an example of flashback. Little Red Riding Hood is thinking back to something that happened earlier in the story.

Stage Directions Mrs. Brand (from her porch). Steve? What was that? Steve (raising his

Stage Directions Mrs. Brand (from her porch). Steve? What was that? Steve (raising his voice and looking toward porch). Guess it was a meteor, honey. Came awful close, didn’t it? Mrs. Brand. Too close for my money! Much too close. • from The Monsters Are Due on Maple Street by Rod Serling • some lines have italicized words and phrases contained within parentheses. These are stage directions. They are not meant to be spoken aloud. For the actors—and for a reader of the play— they offer guidance on what is happening and how to understand the meaning of certain lines.