Identify and describe the seven key reasons why

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Identify and describe the seven key reasons why the U. S. became one of

Identify and describe the seven key reasons why the U. S. became one of the leading industrial nations in the late 1800 s/early 1900 s.

Background information on the first Industrial Revolution: A. Began in England in the 1700

Background information on the first Industrial Revolution: A. Began in England in the 1700 s B. Changes in how products were made 1. from making products by hand to using machines 2. from agriculture (farming) to machines C. The Industrial Revolution spread to the U. S. when textile mills were built in New England. D. After the Civil War (1865), the Second Industrial Revolution began when industry grew rapidly throughout the U. S.

Why is this important to have? • The U. S. had people with domestic

Why is this important to have? • The U. S. had people with domestic capital (business term for money to spend on developing industries •

Why is this important to have? The U. S. had natural resources: • 1.

Why is this important to have? The U. S. had natural resources: • 1. Land • 2. Iron • 3. Coal • 4. Oil

Why are energy sources important to have? • The U. S. had the energy

Why are energy sources important to have? • The U. S. had the energy sources it needed Coal Oil Electricity now • Nuclear Power

 • The U. S. developed transportation systems: Erie Canal • then a large

• The U. S. developed transportation systems: Erie Canal • then a large railroad network including the transcontinental railroads.

 • New inventions were created • Bessemer Process • Telegraph • 3. Telephone

• New inventions were created • Bessemer Process • Telegraph • 3. Telephone • 4. Assembly line

 • . The U. S. had a large influx of immigrants.

• . The U. S. had a large influx of immigrants.

 • The U. S. had an economic system based on capitalism/ free enterprise.

• The U. S. had an economic system based on capitalism/ free enterprise. • Economic system in which private businesses own and operate most industries; competition determines the cost of goods and workers’ pay

Summary • In one paragraph summarize why the U. S. became an industrial leader

Summary • In one paragraph summarize why the U. S. became an industrial leader in the late 1800 s:

Describe the role of railroads in the 2 nd Industrial Revolution:

Describe the role of railroads in the 2 nd Industrial Revolution:

Railroad networks: • Tracks were standardized in the North, South, East and West and

Railroad networks: • Tracks were standardized in the North, South, East and West and railroad networks were created. (A system of connected lines). • Thousands of track was laid. • Sleeping and Dining cars were added. • The first Transcontinental railroad was completed in 1869.

Cornelius Vanderbilt: became the most powerful railroad industrialist. He ordered the construction of Grand

Cornelius Vanderbilt: became the most powerful railroad industrialist. He ordered the construction of Grand Central Terminal in NYC.

Questions to consider: • 1. What were the advantages of railroad consolidation? What were

Questions to consider: • 1. What were the advantages of railroad consolidation? What were its disadvantages? • 2. In 1887, the Interstate Commerce Commission was created to help establish rates. Why do you think it took thirty before it had any real control over the railroads? • 3. How did the railroad industry fuel the growth of the 2 nd Industrial Revolution?

Was Vanderbilt a Robber Baron or a Great Industrial Pioneer/Captain of Industry? Review Vanderbilt’s

Was Vanderbilt a Robber Baron or a Great Industrial Pioneer/Captain of Industry? Review Vanderbilt’s bio information, political cartoon and quotes Add evidence to the scale that shows whether your pair thinks Vanderbilt was a robber baron or captain of industry

Robber Baron: • A capitalist of the late 1800’s (supports capitalism – private individuals

Robber Baron: • A capitalist of the late 1800’s (supports capitalism – private individuals who compete against each other), who acquired (gained) wealth through ruthless business methods.