Hovingham St Hildas CE VC Primary Schools Federation

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Hovingham & St Hilda’s CE (VC) Primary Schools Federation Pupil Home Learning Date: 7/5//20

Hovingham & St Hilda’s CE (VC) Primary Schools Federation Pupil Home Learning Date: 7/5//20 EYFS (Nursery/Reception – Miss Kirk) St Hilda’s. [email protected] co. uk Acorn Class (Y 1 -2 – Miss Dunning) St Hilda’s. [email protected] co. uk Oak Class (Y 3 -6 – Mrs Dodds-Aston) St Hilda’s. [email protected] co. uk Howard Class (Reception – Y 2 Mrs Caddy & Mrs Atherton) Hovingham. [email protected] co. uk Worsley Class (Y 3 -6 – Mr Kelly) Hovingham. [email protected] co. uk Week commencing 23/3/20: Daily PE with Joe Wicks visit -https: //www. youtube. com/watch? v=K 6 r 99 N 3 k. XME to find out more.

Thursday 8 th May 2020 Morning! Wake Up Shake Up? It might feel like

Thursday 8 th May 2020 Morning! Wake Up Shake Up? It might feel like it - but it is not true… https: //www. youtube. com/watch? v=r 7 o. E 47 -9 r. Xk 9. 00 am Joe will be ready to get his wife to do his daily live online workout. https: //www. youtube. com/watch? v=K 6 r 99 N 3 k. XME WEEKLY TIMETABLE OF REINFORCEMENT TASKS MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY Fluent in Five YES YES YES Rapid Reasoning YES YES YES Timestable Rockstars NO NO YES NO Num. Bots YES NO NO NO Matheletics online NO NO YES Journal YES YES YES Spelling Powerpoint Write in sentence Revision Booklet Spelling. She d Dictation Language Gap YES YES YES & WRITING TASK EC and MD remember it is 3 rd. Space Learning at 11 am today!

English Daily Language Gap Work: This can also be found in Shared KS 2.

English Daily Language Gap Work: This can also be found in Shared KS 2. As tomorrow is a bank holiday, we will round up the week today. Y 3/4 are on: Year 3 Term 3 A Summer Week 3 DAY 4/5 On following slides. Y 5/6 are on: Year 5 Term 3 A Summer Week 3 DAY 4/5 On following slides. Spelling: Get someone to test your spellings

Year 3/4

Year 3/4

Year 5/6

Year 5/6

The original version plan…

The original version plan…

My modern version of Pandora’s Box Plan

My modern version of Pandora’s Box Plan

Extension for our more able readers: This is an extract from Charles Dickens’ ‘A

Extension for our more able readers: This is an extract from Charles Dickens’ ‘A Christmas Carol’, where two characters are introduced: Ignorance and Hope. Look at the word choices and use of figurative language. You can watch a clip from an old film where you can see this scene. https: //www. youtube. com/watch? v=x 8 Pk 9 BZQGSI (WARNING: it is a bit sinister!)

In the extract, poverty is presented as being incredibly harsh on those that suffer

In the extract, poverty is presented as being incredibly harsh on those that suffer from it. This is illustrated through the children, Ignorance and Want, that lurk beneath the spirit’s gown. The two of them are the personification of poverty. The spirit reveals how their limbs might “be a claw, for the flesh” upon it. The use of animal imagery here emphasises the way that poverty dehumanises individuals, reducing them to an animalistic state and creating savage beings that will do anything in order to survive. Here, Dickens also implies that poverty has disastrous effects on children, emphasised through the reference to their youth as a “boy” and “girl”. He seems to suggest that poverty is hardest on the young, and that it doesn’t distinguish between the sexes; all are affected by it. The children are described as “yellow, meagre, ragged, scowling, wolfish”. The use of this asyndetic sentence emphasises the number of terrible side effects of poverty. Furthermore, describing them as being “yellow” in their appearance connotes a sense of sickness, suggesting that poverty is a disease that needs to be treated. Poverty is also presented as something that ages those that experience it; mentally, physically and emotionally. Ignorance and Want are described as not having “graceful youth, ” instead they have been touched with the “stale and shrivelled hand” of age, which has “pinched and twisted them. ” The use of personification here emphasises how poverty is spiteful; robbing children of their innocence. The vicious nature of poverty is further suggested through the violent verbs “pinched” and “twisted. ” The lack of innocence is also implied as “devils lurked” where “angels might have sat enthroned. ” During the Victorian era, 50% of the country’s population regularly attended church. It was also a common belief that God spoke through the voice of children. Victorian readers would have been shocked at the representation of children that are “monsters, ” with “devils, ” lurking within them, as a result of poverty. Here, Dickens warns readers of the perils of the commonly held belief that those in poverty should not be assisted, implying that a failure to intervene and help, will create more of these devilish beings. The Spirit warns Scrooge (and wealthy Victorian readers like him) that the children “are Man’s” implying that mankind has created them, and is therefore the solution to transforming them. The role that mankind has in eradicating poverty is further shown through the names of the children. Both are “wretched, abject, frightful, hideous and miserable, ” as a result of “Ignorance” and “Want” existing in society. Dickens illustrates how the ignorance of those in society, who like Scrooge, assume that people suffering in poverty are sinners, undeserving of help, creates a cycle of poverty where children suffer hardships and then develop into damaged “hideous, ” and “miserable, ” adults. Likewise, as a result of this ignorance, many are left in “want” – needing basic provisions to survive and perhaps committing sins in order to obtain them. Dickens suggests that poverty drives people to go from being the honest poor to becoming “monsters, ” a view supported by William Booth’s ‘Darkest England’ where the poor were categorised into three groups. He suggests that failure to address the ignorance and want in society will lead to “Doom. ” Here, Dickens warns readers of the need for societal change in the way that the poor are treated. Through these children, he highlights the lasting damage poverty has, a belief that resonated with him from his own traumatic childhood, where he experienced poverty first hand, when his parents were sent to prison. Dickens believed that a country’s moral wealth could be shown through its treatment of children and the representation of Ignorance and Want, suggests that children in the 1840 s were not valued or protected. He warns, through the Spirit, “Slander those who tell it ye, ” suggesting that Scrooge (and readers) must stand up against those in society that promote the poor treatment of the poor and, in particular, children. The definition of asyndetic refers to the act of leaving out one or more of the usual conjunctions between sentence elements. The sentence “I gave her food, shelter, clothing” is an example of asyndetic.

Maths: Fluent in 5 and Rapid Reasoning Week 27 Day 4 On the following

Maths: Fluent in 5 and Rapid Reasoning Week 27 Day 4 On the following Slides. Year 3 and 4 Fluent and Five - have a go at these challenges: https: //www. bbc. co. uk/bitesize/articles/zd 3 q 2 sg Year 5 and 6 Fluent and Five -have a go at these challenges: https: //www. bbc. co. uk/bitesize/articles/z 4 tc 92 p If you have agreed to Timestable Rockstars for 10 minutes do 3 rd Space Learning today, then you do not need to do this work today!

For Art Today I would like you to make a tin foil sculpture of

For Art Today I would like you to make a tin foil sculpture of a figure in action: Here are some links to inspire you. You might try your favourite sport? https: //www. youtube. com/watch? v=V LTFi. Gt-kx. U https: //www. youtube. com/watch? v=k YDay. Hvcj. Y 4 https: //www. youtube. com/watch? v=6 PWKC 8 Ct. Imo I would love to see a photograph of your finished piece.