Home Sweet Home An Introduction to Home Based

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Home Sweet Home An Introduction to Home Based Early Childhood Services.

Home Sweet Home An Introduction to Home Based Early Childhood Services.

True False You are a teacher You live within 30 minutes of Wausau You

True False You are a teacher You live within 30 minutes of Wausau You live more than two hours away You have provided educational services in the home environment You or your district are thinking about offering home based services Why did you choose this session?

Inclusion in Early Childhood Settings Brief history of Inclusionary practices for early childhood students

Inclusion in Early Childhood Settings Brief history of Inclusionary practices for early childhood students with disabilities. Brown et al, 2013 Support and Guidance for Inclusionary Practices: Early Childhood Inclusion Definition (DEC and NAEYC) Access Participation Support

Environment FAPE/LRE DPI Info Bulletin 2010 DPI LRE Flowchart

Environment FAPE/LRE DPI Info Bulletin 2010 DPI LRE Flowchart

Team Goals ● Base goals on the Disability Related Needs ● Goals are written

Team Goals ● Base goals on the Disability Related Needs ● Goals are written with the intent of all team members working together to help the child achieve them, however one provider is selected to take data and report progress on the goal. ● Goals are written functional for the child’s current environment.

Disability Related Needs Student needs to develop/improve/build skills in (name area) so they can

Disability Related Needs Student needs to develop/improve/build skills in (name area) so they can (statement related to effect of disability). Examples: ● ● ● Student needs to increase his/her balance, locomotor patterns, strength, and body awareness to allow him/her to access his/her daily environments and keep pace with peers. Student needs to improve fine-visual motor coordination skills to better engage in developmentally appropriate activities. Student needs to improve his/her ability to engage in social play opportunities so that he/she can become a more active social partner as well as increase his/her ability to learn through social play.

Examples of DRN ● ● Student needs to improve his/her ability to regulate a

Examples of DRN ● ● Student needs to improve his/her ability to regulate a variety of sensory inputs with appropriate responses to safely participate in tasks across settings and situations. Student needs to build his/her expressive language skills so that he/she can communicate his/her wants, needs, thoughts, and knowledge with others at an age expected level. Student needs to build his/her understanding of language so that he/she can participate in family and classroom routines by following simple directions. Student needs to build his/her articulation so that he/she can clearly share his/her wants, needs, thoughts, and knowledge with family, caregivers, teachers, and peers.

Examples of Team Based Goals ● Student will increase social joint attention and active

Examples of Team Based Goals ● Student will increase social joint attention and active participation in learning through play by meeting the following short term objectives: ○ ○ ○ ● 1) Given modeling, moderate cues, and sensory support, Student will sustain attention in productive play (creative/constructive) for 5 minutes in 75% of observed opportunities. 2) Given modeling, moderate cues, and sensory support, Student will imitate at least 3 creative play actions, demonstrated at least 3 times, in 8 different interactive and creative play schemes (such as driving cars or feeding play food to a stuffed animal). 3) Given a creative play scheme and sensory supports, Student will independently use at least 2 creative play actions, demonstrated at least twice, in 4 different interactive and creative play schemes across (such as driving cars or feeding play food to a stuffed animal). Given minimal support (25% assist), demonstration and prompts, Student will improve fine-visual motor coordination measured by: ○ ○ 1. Use a dominant hand, pronated grasp (fingers pointed down) of writing utensil to scribble/ color and imitate a prewriting stroke (such as vertical, horizontal, or circular line), 75% of observed opportunities 2. Stack a 5+ block tower with 1 inch blocks, 75% of observed opportunities

Con’t Goal Examples ● ● ● Given direct instruction, modeling and practice, Student will

Con’t Goal Examples ● ● ● Given direct instruction, modeling and practice, Student will show understanding of vocabulary by accurately picking up/touching a familiar object/picture, from a field of up to 4, when requested with 50% accuracy across 3 data collections. Given direct instruction, modeling, and practice, Student will initiate and direct communication towards a communication partner (eg: touch, look at, hand an object/picture to a communication partner, gain body proximity) with minimal adult support (eg. holding items next to face, extended wait time for eye contact before beginning the activity) so that he can request to continue positive social interactions on 3 out of 5 activities across 3 data collections. Given moderate support (visual/verbal/tactile cues or up to 50% assist) and sensory supports, Student will improve regulation abilities measured by keeping safe actions when presented with non-preferred tasks or adult guidance in 60% of observed opportunities.

Practice Writing Your Own Goals: We will come around and hand out example Disability

Practice Writing Your Own Goals: We will come around and hand out example Disability Related Needs and you can come up with goals focusing on the whole child. Try to write a Social and/or Play goal, and one goal in another related service area.

Team Programming ● Starting small ● Standards based and linked to 4 K curriculum

Team Programming ● Starting small ● Standards based and linked to 4 K curriculum ● Individualized based on child needs and interests ● PLAY! ● Set a routine ● Repeated exposure to activities and every provider worked through the same activities

Team Programming Activity Planning Example Goal Planning Example

Team Programming Activity Planning Example Goal Planning Example

Practice Your Own Team Programming ● ● ● Plan for a child with the

Practice Your Own Team Programming ● ● ● Plan for a child with the goals you wrote We’ve provided you with some materials to get you started Incorporate ways that at least two service providers would use these materials

Working with the parents ● ● ● ● Before you start “teaching”, as the

Working with the parents ● ● ● ● Before you start “teaching”, as the family what they have been doing. What is new/different. What successes/challenges have they faced this week. Look at what is meaningful for the family, you will get better involvement. Bagless Therapy- What have you heard, what do you know? Some of our more involved students, we provided them with the programming guide and left the materials for the week – in this case we needed the pictures specifically for that Remember to encourage the family, let them know the great things they are doing from day to day! Describe the strategies behind the activities Always leave with a suggestion: one thing the family can do

Successes Building collaborative relationships with parents and ongoing natural opportunities for generalization and coaching.

Successes Building collaborative relationships with parents and ongoing natural opportunities for generalization and coaching. Team collaboration that led to meaningful team programming. Integration of parent goals and perspective. Parents understand the intention and integration of their child’s goals into play and therapy activities. Increasing parent carry-over. Team members believe there is an overall increase in the impact, effectiveness, and intentionality of therapy and instructional sessions. Personal/professional growth of practitioners

Challenges and Opportunities Collaboration and Planning time Unexpected environmental factors Parental Involvement Peer interaction/play

Challenges and Opportunities Collaboration and Planning time Unexpected environmental factors Parental Involvement Peer interaction/play when in home with no siblings Considerations during LRE discussions when home is child’s natural environment

Questions and Answers

Questions and Answers