Harvard Street Forum A Successful CommunityCampus Collaboration Nancy

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Harvard Street Forum: A Successful Community-Campus Collaboration Nancy J. Baker MD, Jon Hallberg MD,

Harvard Street Forum: A Successful Community-Campus Collaboration Nancy J. Baker MD, Jon Hallberg MD, Joseph Brocato Ph. D Department of Family Medicine and Community Health

Presentation Goal • The goal of this lecture discussion is to describe a unique

Presentation Goal • The goal of this lecture discussion is to describe a unique 3 year community-campus collaboration at the University of Minnesota. Minneapolis campus

Presentation Objectives By the end of this session, participants will be able to: •

Presentation Objectives By the end of this session, participants will be able to: • Identify some of the characteristics and qualities that promote effective community-campus partnerships • Describe the potential of collaboratives such as the Harvard St. Forum to instruct and motivate citizens and health care workers to work together for social justice • State some of the potential ongoing campuscollaborative challenges that relate to organizational infrastructure, leadership, funding, etc.

Session Outline • Brief History of the Harvard Street Forum – Beginnings – Mission

Session Outline • Brief History of the Harvard Street Forum – Beginnings – Mission and target audience • Description of Harvard Street Forum Events – Guest presenters and musicians • Evaluation of Programs – Qualitative and quantitative data • Discussion • Summary: Lessons Learned/Future Activities

Harvard Street Forum History • Who? – Volunteer representation from Grace University Lutheran Church,

Harvard Street Forum History • Who? – Volunteer representation from Grace University Lutheran Church, Univ. of MN Academic Health Center, DFMCH and the Center for Arts and Medicine • What? – A forum where university students, staff, faculty and members of the surrounding community come together to consider issues of relevance and controversy that affect our lives as citizens and health care providers • When? – June 2005 to the present; 2 -3 events per year for a total of 7 thus far; 12 -1 pm Fridays; brown bag lunch and coffee • Where? – On campus but “off-site” at Grace Church

Harvard Street Forum Mission • Why? – We want to educate and inspire –

Harvard Street Forum Mission • Why? – We want to educate and inspire – We’re eager to facilitate intra-professional and campuscommunity dialogue – We provide resources – We want to motivate colleagues to act – Our ultimate mission: To provide a forum where conscience and calling embrace the world’s needs • How? – Initial funds from DFMCH; 2006 seed grant from Office of Public Engagement; ongoing support from the Center for Arts and Medicine

“Military Medicine and Torture: Learning from Abu Ghraib” Steven Miles MD • Steve Miles

“Military Medicine and Torture: Learning from Abu Ghraib” Steven Miles MD • Steve Miles is a household name in Minnesota • Center for Bioethics • Voice of conscience • Music by James Riccardo (Music Director, Health Sciences Orchestra), theme from “Schindler’s List”

“A Compassionate Response to Disaster: Lessons Learned from 9/11, the Tsunami and Katrina” •

“A Compassionate Response to Disaster: Lessons Learned from 9/11, the Tsunami and Katrina” • Dr. Mendenhall has worked in New York, Indonesia, and Louisiana following disasters • Many health care providers at the U of MN spent time in Louisiana following hurricane Katrina • Guitar music by two local folk musicians Jon Hallberg MD, Tai Mendenhall Ph. D

“Miss Evers’ Boys: Factual Fiction and Ethical Truths” • David has a Ph. D

“Miss Evers’ Boys: Factual Fiction and Ethical Truths” • David has a Ph. D in theater; • Wrote the Pulitzer Prize-nominated play “Miss Evers’ Boys” • T. Mychael Rambo sang gospel music David Feldshuh MD, Ph. D

“I and I: Reflections on Aging” Charles Keating Joshua Koestenbaum • This piece (a

“I and I: Reflections on Aging” Charles Keating Joshua Koestenbaum • This piece (a solo dramatic reading) was commissioned by the Center for Arts and Medicine for a CME course; world premiere was three days before • Music by SPCO associate principal cellist

“AIDS and the Pursuit of Social Justice” Joia Mukherjee MD, MPH, MS • Joia

“AIDS and the Pursuit of Social Justice” Joia Mukherjee MD, MPH, MS • Joia is a U of M graduate (Jon’s classmate) • She works with Paul Farmer and is medical director of Partners in Health • Afro-jazz music provided by Keith Henry and band

“One-Breasted Woman: Passionate Vulnerability, One Way to Cope with Cancer” • Sam King is

“One-Breasted Woman: Passionate Vulnerability, One Way to Cope with Cancer” • Sam King is a wellknown local poet • Our first forum dealing with personal suffering • Sam suggested the musician Patricia Mc. Pherson and Clea Galhano Susan “Sam” Deborah King

“Beyond the Yellow Ribbon: Getting All the Way Home” • Dr. Le. Blanc was

“Beyond the Yellow Ribbon: Getting All the Way Home” • Dr. Le. Blanc was a college classmate of Nancy’s • The brass quintet provided a respectful “military- like” sound Basil Le. Blanc MD North Shore Brass

Evaluation Plan for HSF • Evolving evaluation design, from one-dimensional selfevaluation (qualitative focus) to

Evaluation Plan for HSF • Evolving evaluation design, from one-dimensional selfevaluation (qualitative focus) to mixed methods. • Evaluation is now longitudinal, tied to program goals and session objectives (impact of knowledge and change in attitudes) • Ongoing involvement with topic matter and course design

HSF Quantitative Data (sample from last session, 2/15/08)* • 23/60 completed evaluations (38%) •

HSF Quantitative Data (sample from last session, 2/15/08)* • 23/60 completed evaluations (38%) • Who attends? – Med school and Univ. staff members (39%); community members (35%); med school faculty (13%); others (9%); medical students (4%) • How did they learn about HSF? – Advertisement (58%); word of mouth (42%) • How many sessions were attended? : – None (44%); One or two (44%); Three or four (12%) • Session that made the biggest impact? : – David Feldshuh (43%); Charles Keating (29%); Susan King (14%), Basil Leblanc (14%) • How well did we meet our program goal? : – 7. 76 on 10 point scale (“not successful” to “extremely successful”)

HSF Quantitative Data (continued) • Impact on life/work going forward: – Mindful of psychological/emotional

HSF Quantitative Data (continued) • Impact on life/work going forward: – Mindful of psychological/emotional issues faced by returning vets: 95% agree/strongly agree – Mindful of the physical injuries of returning vets: 73% agree or strongly agree; 23% neither disagree/agree; 4% disagree. – Mindful of role of community-based resources: 91% agree/strongly agree – Empathy toward returning vets: 91% agree/strongly agree • Focus group interest: 4/21 (19%)

HSF Qualitative Data • Next steps for the community (10/21: 48%) – “Communication and

HSF Qualitative Data • Next steps for the community (10/21: 48%) – “Communication and education” – “Awareness” – “Push government to fund ‘yellow ribbon’ for years” – “Communicate our belief that the VA needs to be accountable” – “Make positive attempt to engage veterans”

HSF Qualitative Data (continued) • Next steps for the community (10/21: 48%) – “Get

HSF Qualitative Data (continued) • Next steps for the community (10/21: 48%) – “Get word out to the media” – “Further awareness and talks” – “Communities and employers need training on returning vets” – “Raise awareness in a non-partisan way” – “Vote to stop the war!”

HSF Qualitative Data (continued) • Future topics (3/21/08: 14%) – “The role of civil

HSF Qualitative Data (continued) • Future topics (3/21/08: 14%) – “The role of civil disobedience among healthcare workers (healthcare workers and politics)” – “Marjorie Sartropi to talk about Persepolis and women in Iran” – “Invite follow-up speaker on discussion concerning anger”

Discussion • Audience experience(s) with similar initiatives? • Who is the target audience? •

Discussion • Audience experience(s) with similar initiatives? • Who is the target audience? • How do you determine program content and/or curriculum? • How do you publicize/market your activities? • How have you mobilized necessary resources? • Have you been successful? • What are reasonable measures of success? • Other?

Harvard St. Forum Lessons Learned • “There is a hunger for collaboration in our

Harvard St. Forum Lessons Learned • “There is a hunger for collaboration in our community. ” • “This is an ideal way to address the importance of, and incorporate Daniel Pink’s six senses into our personal and professional lives. ” • “This provides me opportunity to step back and think about why I’m in this line of work. ”

Presentation Summary By the end of this session, you are now able to: •

Presentation Summary By the end of this session, you are now able to: • Identify some of the characteristics and qualities that promote effective community-campus partnerships • Describe the potential of collaboratives such as the Harvard St. Forum to instruct and motivate citizens and health care workers to work together for social justice • State some of the potential ongoing campuscollaborative challenges that relate to organizational infrastructure, leadership, funding, etc.

Harvard St. Forum Contact Information • Nancy Baker MD baker 024@umn. edu • Jon

Harvard St. Forum Contact Information • Nancy Baker MD baker [email protected] edu • Jon Hallberg MD hallb [email protected] edu • Joe Brocato Ph. D broca [email protected] edu