Global culture Global culture Pop culture fast food

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Global culture

Global culture

Global culture Pop culture: fast food στην Μπανγκόκ

Global culture Pop culture: fast food στην Μπανγκόκ

© 2000 Prentice Hall

© 2000 Prentice Hall

Table 1. 1 Unethical Marketing Behavior TYPES OF UNETHICAL MARKETING BEHAVIOR EXAMPLES PRODUCT •

Table 1. 1 Unethical Marketing Behavior TYPES OF UNETHICAL MARKETING BEHAVIOR EXAMPLES PRODUCT • Safety • Shoddy goods • Inadequate warranties • Environmental pollution • Mislabeled products • Development • Manufacturing • Brand “knock-offs” PRICE • Excessive markups • Price differentiation • Price discrimination PACKAGING • Deceptive quantities Manufacture of flammable stuffed animals Products that cannot withstand ordinary wear and tear Warranties with insufficient time or parts coverage Dumping hazardous wastes Flavored sugar water sold as apple juice for babies Bribery of FDA officials to secure agency approval of generic pharmaceuticals Unauthorized substitutions in generic drugs after FDA approval Counterfeit branded goods sold as genuine brands High prices used by retailers to connote quality Yield-management pricing of airline tickets, resulting in day- to-day differential pricing of adjacent seats Favored pricing to preferred racial or ethnic groups Some marketers use “packaging-to-price” tactics that mask a decrease in product quantity while maintaining the same price and traditional product size

Table 1. 1 continued PROMOTION • Exaggerated claims • Tasteless advertising • Inappropriate targeting

Table 1. 1 continued PROMOTION • Exaggerated claims • Tasteless advertising • Inappropriate targeting • Deceptive advertising • Persuasive role models for inappropriate products • Naïve audiences • Captive audiences • Telemarketing DISTRIBUTION • Fraudulent sales • Bait-and-switch tactics • Direct marketing Razor blade manufacture advertises that its razors offered “the closest shave known to man” Sexual innuendoes and gender disparagement Inner-city billboards for luxury products Ads for cereal claiming it prevents heart disease Celebrity spokespersons in beer, liquor, or cigarette ads targeted to youths Billboards for cigarettes and alcohol in poor urban neighborhoods, where many people are dying from related causes Ads on children’s TV for nutritionally unsound products Mandatory viewing of TV commercials by students in schools subscribing to closed channel newscasts Offers of fabulous prizes in return for credit-card purchases of touted goods Phony markdowns based on “kited” retail list prices Luring consumers with ads for low-priced merchandise and switching them to higher-priced models Deceptive, misleading product size and performance claims

Table 1. 2 Unethical Consumer Practices • Shoplifting • Switching price tags • Returning

Table 1. 2 Unethical Consumer Practices • Shoplifting • Switching price tags • Returning clothing that has been worn • Abusing products and returning them as damaged goods • Redeeming coupons without the requisite purchase • Redeeming coupons that have expired • Returning products bought at sale and demanding the full-price refund • Sealing belts from store clothing • Cutting buttons off store merchandise • Returning partially used products for full store credit • Abusing warranty or unconditional guarantee privileges • Damaging merchandise in a store and then demanding a sales discount • Duplicating copyrighted materials without permission

Figure 1. 2 Example of a Company Policy Statement Stressing Social Responsibility

Figure 1. 2 Example of a Company Policy Statement Stressing Social Responsibility