Global Collaboration to Accelerate Transition to Open Access

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Global Collaboration to Accelerate Transition to Open Access Daisy Selematsela (Ph. D & Professor

Global Collaboration to Accelerate Transition to Open Access Daisy Selematsela (Ph. D & Professor of Practice of Knowledge and Information Management – University of Johannesburg) Unisa Open Access 2020 Webinar 21 October 2020

University of South Africa – Pretoria South Africa

University of South Africa – Pretoria South Africa

Global Collaboration to Accelerate Transition to Open Access

Global Collaboration to Accelerate Transition to Open Access

Global change drivers in 2020 • World rapidly changed and countries are grappling with

Global change drivers in 2020 • World rapidly changed and countries are grappling with – how to use scientific advances to deal with challenges i. e COVID 19 – how to build resilience in a fragile world

Potential lies in collaborative opportunities offered by a changing, increasingly connected and globalized environment

Potential lies in collaborative opportunities offered by a changing, increasingly connected and globalized environment

Global Drivers • • • Social Change Scientific & Technological Economic Environmental Geopolitical

Global Drivers • • • Social Change Scientific & Technological Economic Environmental Geopolitical

Global Driver: Social Change • Exponential population growth – 11 Billion by 2100 –

Global Driver: Social Change • Exponential population growth – 11 Billion by 2100 – competition for resources • Aging population – 2050 estimated 80% of older people will live in Developing World; will have no regular income • Africa Youth “bulge” – high youth unemployment – drives inequality & social instability • 2050 Global North estimated 84% urbanised & Africa 62% - potential for economic growth BUT expose people to marginalisation, conflict and exploitation • Increasing uncontrolled migration to developed countries – leading to social instability • International mobility of highly educated individuals, supported by digital technologies – drives global knowledge circulation.

Global Driver: Scientific & Technological • Modern science and data proliferation – access to

Global Driver: Scientific & Technological • Modern science and data proliferation – access to range of data form multiple sources with variable quality; • Science breakthroughs are quicker, translated faster into innovations; • 4 IR (Fourth Industrial Revolution) blurred lines between physical & digital spheres – with legal, ethical & socio-economic consequences.

Global Driver: Economic • Emerging economies: Growing middle class and increasing consumerism increase demand

Global Driver: Economic • Emerging economies: Growing middle class and increasing consumerism increase demand for goods & services; • Technological change promotes social inclusion & economic growth BUT cause loss of traditional jobs – high proportion of unskilled workers; • Disruptive effects of globalization – analysts do not foresee the large scale retreat of globalization even though there are protective policies

Global Driver: Environmental • Climate change challenges – degradation of the natural environment, i.

Global Driver: Environmental • Climate change challenges – degradation of the natural environment, i. e biodiversity loss will shape policies • New policies will require new technologies, processes, services and business models

Global Driver: Geopolitical • Shift of worlds economic and political power from West and

Global Driver: Geopolitical • Shift of worlds economic and political power from West and North, to East and South (Axis) • International landscape is increasingly multipolar

Implications of the drivers of global change

Implications of the drivers of global change

 • Current innovative thinking does not adequately seem to respond to a world

• Current innovative thinking does not adequately seem to respond to a world in rapid transition. • Shift from thinking about systems in isolation to considering the entire socio-technical systems and values underlying them. – i. e focus on a transport system to systems of mobility

Knowledge development • Creation/support of knowledge networks – i. e scientists organise scientific exchanges,

Knowledge development • Creation/support of knowledge networks – i. e scientists organise scientific exchanges, educational programmes, and other opportunities to build capacity and encourage innovation and knowledge production – improve science diplomacy •

Open Science & Open Innovation • Access to public science provides potential for research

Open Science & Open Innovation • Access to public science provides potential for research ecosystem to be participative & productive by: – Reducing duplication and the costs of creating, transferring and reusing data. • Fostering digitally enabled open and collaborative innovation is key – In a networked world – no longer possible to ring-fence what we know/have invented and to create new value through internal means alone! • Collaborative innovation involves greater use of Internet, digital technologies & social networks to foster learning, enable the co-creation of (codified) knowledge, and provide wide access to tools, data and resources.

References • 2018 White Paper on Science, Technology and Innovation – www. dst. gov

References • 2018 White Paper on Science, Technology and Innovation – www. dst. gov – www. gcis. gov. za