GCSE Modern Foreign Languages Improving GCSE Writing Controlled

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GCSE Modern Foreign Languages Improving GCSE Writing Controlled Assessment Steps to success

GCSE Modern Foreign Languages Improving GCSE Writing Controlled Assessment Steps to success

Task & Purpose: • Candidates should be encouraged to construct and deliver their own

Task & Purpose: • Candidates should be encouraged to construct and deliver their own individual response to the task and its purpose. • Discuss with candidates: What should the content and ideas be? How best should their response be organised and developed?

Task & Purpose: • Purpose is an important factor (Article, Report, Blog, Competition entry,

Task & Purpose: • Purpose is an important factor (Article, Report, Blog, Competition entry, Letter or E-mail). • Purpose is just as important as task title, because it gives point to the task. • You could even invite candidates to devise their own preferred context. (They do not all have to do the same!)

Task & Purpose: • Candidates should decide what vocabulary and structures they have learned

Task & Purpose: • Candidates should decide what vocabulary and structures they have learned will best support their ideas and make them their own. • Teachers should not provide candidates with specific language items. • Candidates do need to be taught how the language works, so that they can demonstrate their own level of complexity and control.

Task Choice: • With a mixed ability group it is essential to promote some

Task Choice: • With a mixed ability group it is essential to promote some differentiation of task and scope, gently guiding task choice for weaker candidates, in accordance with perceived individual potential. • A ‘one size fits all’ approach is emphatically not recommended. Compare the range of sample tasks in OCR’s Guide to Controlled Assessment – Writing (http: //www. ocr. org. uk/Images/78314 -guide-to-controlledassessment-writing. pdf). Consider how they have been set up and differentiated.

Task Choice: • Let candidates come up with ideas and suggestions. • Let more

Task Choice: • Let candidates come up with ideas and suggestions. • Let more able candidates choose their task! • Avoid templates, detailed suggestions for candidates and focussed lists of ‘suitable’ phrases for inclusion!

Group Preparation: • Allow candidates to discuss approaches to the topic and possible tasks.

Group Preparation: • Allow candidates to discuss approaches to the topic and possible tasks. • Ideally this should be done in English as this offers a ‘level playing –field’ for all abilities in the first instance.

Group Preparation: • Candidates could also be encouraged to discuss ideas for the task

Group Preparation: • Candidates could also be encouraged to discuss ideas for the task at home, both before and/or after the class session.

Individual Preparation: • Ensure candidates are familiar with the word-count recommendations. • 200 –

Individual Preparation: • Ensure candidates are familiar with the word-count recommendations. • 200 – 300 words targeting grades A* - C • 100 – 175 words targeting D – G • It is good practice for candidates to provide a word count, so that they know where they stand in this respect.

Individual Preparation: • Candidates should be encouraged to think about structure and development, not

Individual Preparation: • Candidates should be encouraged to think about structure and development, not just different content elements. • Consideration of the reader (for whom the writer is writing), should be always kept in focus. • Attention should be given to punctuation, to the logical linking of paragraphs, and to the logical, appropriate linking and expansion/explanation of ideas.

“A satisfying and meaningful read” • Clarity – are the points, the arguments clear

“A satisfying and meaningful read” • Clarity – are the points, the arguments clear with sufficient detail? • Is the language precise enough or must the reader do some guesswork?

“A satisfying and meaningful read” • Relevance – is it all relevant to the

“A satisfying and meaningful read” • Relevance – is it all relevant to the stated task and purpose? • Is there some irrelevant material, just there to try to impress linguistically? • Are points of view developed, and justified in the wider sense by expansion and explanation, or are there ‘hanging’ (isolated) opinions?

“A satisfying and meaningful read” • Effectiveness – do points follow logically? • Are

“A satisfying and meaningful read” • Effectiveness – do points follow logically? • Are explanations convincing? • Is the content generalised and ‘rote’? • Is the language used precise and appropriate? • Is it idiomatic (= sounding natural for the language concerned) or somewhat anglicised (= word-for-word translated)? • Are the language and the structures repetitive and with little variety?

“A satisfying and meaningful read” • Coherence – both in the sense of ‘clear’

“A satisfying and meaningful read” • Coherence – both in the sense of ‘clear’ and in the sense of ‘sticking together. ’ • Is there a sense of ‘wholeness’ to the work? • Do all paragraphs develop reasonably out of each other, or are they isolated or random in their focus?

“A satisfying and meaningful read” • Depends on good literacy generally. • The freedom

“A satisfying and meaningful read” • Depends on good literacy generally. • The freedom of task and task approach of this Specification is intended to encourage effective and meaningful writing.

Assessment Basis: • Marks for “Communication” (15 marks) and “Quality of Language” (15 marks)

Assessment Basis: • Marks for “Communication” (15 marks) and “Quality of Language” (15 marks) are awarded on a best fit basis. • All descriptors within each band should be weighed together in order to find the most appropriate mark for a piece of work. • None of the mark band descriptors should be taken in isolation. • It is not a question of ‘jumping through hoops’, or ‘clearing hurdles’.

Assessment Basis: • “Communication” and “Quality of Language” mark-schemes are inter-dependent: comparison of descriptors

Assessment Basis: • “Communication” and “Quality of Language” mark-schemes are inter-dependent: comparison of descriptors shows that ‘Communication’ needs linguistic clarity, relevance and variety, just as ‘Quality’ needs control, lack of ambiguity, relevance and coherence. • More sophisticated communication requires more sophisticated or complex language. Appropriate marks for “Communication” and for “Quality” will therefore almost certainly complement each other.

Assessment Basis: • Share and discuss the mark-scheme criteria with candidates in advance, so

Assessment Basis: • Share and discuss the mark-scheme criteria with candidates in advance, so that they may also have insight into how they will be assessed (see section 4 of the Specification).

Assessment Basis: • Convincing: Does it sound authentic? • Adverbs and adverbial phrases are

Assessment Basis: • Convincing: Does it sound authentic? • Adverbs and adverbial phrases are especially useful for conveying personality and individuality in a piece of writing. They readily show points of view without wasting a lot of words and also facilitate moving from one point to the next or from one paragraph to the next.

Assessment Basis: • Fullness of response: There has to be enough there to complete

Assessment Basis: • Fullness of response: There has to be enough there to complete the task and purpose contexts. • Candidates have actual preparation time, as much further thinking time as they wish to use, and sixty minutes in which to write up what they have prepared. The quality and thoroughness of this preparation is what will determine the individual outcome, and what will therefore differentiate candidate achievement.

Assessment Basis: • The basis of this MFL GCSE Specification is that candidates should

Assessment Basis: • The basis of this MFL GCSE Specification is that candidates should want to express their own views to the best of their individual ability, and that they should be given the freedom and opportunities to do so. • The appropriate language skills (see Appendix B of the Specification) of course need to be taught, in order to help each candidate show what s/he can achieve.

Finally: • Impress upon candidates that they need to write legibly • Encourage candidates

Finally: • Impress upon candidates that they need to write legibly • Encourage candidates to proof read their work to check for spellings an accents (in particular where the lack of or addition of an accent changes the meaning of the word).

Thank you for using this OCR resource Other OCR resources are available at www.

Thank you for using this OCR resource Other OCR resources are available at www. ocr. org. uk To give us feedback on, or ideas about, the OCR resources you have used email [email protected] org. uk If you do not currently offer this OCR qualification but would like to do so, please complete the Expression of Interest Form which can be found here: www. ocr. org. uk/expression-of-interest OCR Resources: the small print OCR’s resources are provided to support the teaching of OCR specifications, but in no way constitute an endorsed teaching method that is required by the Board, and the decision to use them lies with the individual teacher. Whilst every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of the content, OCR cannot be held responsible for any errors or omissions within these resources. © OCR 2015 - This resource may be freely copied and distributed, as long as the OCR logo and this message remain intact and OCR is acknowledged as the originator of this work. Please get in touch if you want to discuss the accessibility of resources we offer to support delivery of our qualifications: resources. [email protected] org. uk