GCSE History OCR Modern World B SUMMER 2017

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GCSE History OCR Modern World B SUMMER 2017 REVISION BOOKLET Use: • Your notes

GCSE History OCR Modern World B SUMMER 2017 REVISION BOOKLET Use: • Your notes • Your revision guide • Our revision sessions • Websites such as: • http: //www. johndclare. net • BBC Bitesize • Arden’s VLE

GCSE HISTORY (OCR MODERN WORLD: SPEC B) STRUCTURE OF THE EXAM QUESTIONS PAPER ONE:

GCSE HISTORY (OCR MODERN WORLD: SPEC B) STRUCTURE OF THE EXAM QUESTIONS PAPER ONE: International Relations and America Depth Study KNOWLEDGE QUESTIONS (a) Describe (4 marks) i. e. What happened, What were the aims. . . You just need to give 4 different points to get four marks OR give two points and add in extra detail. One paragraph is enough. (b) Explain (6 marks) OR (8 marks) i. e. Explain why Britain and France followed Appeasement. • These are sometimes worth 6 marks and sometimes worth 8 marks but you do the same thing. • You need to explain three things (three PEEL paragraphs). • Be careful not to just explain what happened – you need to make sure you link back to the question. Use detail, why does each point matter? This should be between ½ and ¾ of a page. (c) Evaluate [Reach a judgment] (10 marks) i. e. How far do you agree that…. There are two different types of question you might get here: Straightforward ‘How far’ question. You need 4 sections to answer it: • A brief introduction (a couple of sentences) which outlines what the question asked you. • On the one hand… (explain, in as much detail as possible all the evidence that you can think of to support the statement. Don’t just list it or describe what happened, explain it. ) • On the other hand… (explain, in as much detail as possible all the evidence that you can think of to challenge the statement. ) • Your conclusion. Explain your view in detail. You need to make a judgement here. Think about how you could categorise the evidence to make a judgement. Explain exactly what you mean as clearly as possible. Question asking you to weigh up the importance of different events or factors. • This question will give you a list of factors /events and ask you how far you think they are of equal importance. You need to set this out slightly differently. • Start with your introduction exactly as before. • However, then you need a paragraph on each of the different factors / events. • Your conclusion will need to make a judgement just as before. You should really try not just to say that one is more important, but show all the factors / events link together and impact upon each other. MESSAGE OF THE SOURCE Source Question (7 marks) What is the message of the source? You need to include three sections here: - The message of the source is…. [make sure you give the actual message and don’t just describe the source] - I can tell this because… [how the content of the source supports this – give 3 or 4 points. ] - At the time… [what was going on at the time the cartoon was published and this links to its message? ]

You will have to answer different source questions. There is no way of knowing

You will have to answer different source questions. There is no way of knowing exactly which types of questions will come up but there are lots of usual suspects. This is a brief guide on how to approach these questions. Why was this poster published? This is extremely similar to the ‘What is the message of the source? ’ You approach it in exactly the same way. You need to include three sections: - Start by answering the question. . . [make sure you give purpose of the source and don’t just give its message or just describe it. ] - I can tell this because… [how the content of the source supports its purpose– give 3 or 4 points. ] - At the time… [what was going on at the time, why was it published at this specific time? ] Does this source prove… KEY POINT TO REMEMBER: Can one source really ever prove anything? (No!) • With this type of question you need to think about the content of the source and how it matches up with your own knowledge of the topic. • There will always be strengths and weaknesses • Your knowledge should support the strengths and point out the weaknesses. • It should also be used to point out any other important points that the source doesn’t make. Are you surprised… KEY POINT TO REMEMBER: Always say why you are surprised AND why you are not surprised. • Think about this type of question like a ‘How far’ question. • Your answer needs to have two sides. You should never be very surprised! How far does this source explain… KEY POINT TO REMEMBER: Can one source really ever explain everything? (No!) • Here you again need to think about the content of the source and how it can be used to explain the issue in the question. • Because it is a ‘how far’ question you need to have two sides so don’t forget to also use your own knowledge to explain important points not in the source. How useful is this source? KEY POINT TO REMEMBER: Always say why it is useful AND why it is not. • Again, think about this type of question like a ‘How far’ question. • Use the content of the source and your knowledge of the topic to explain both strengths and limitations of the source. GENERAL SOURCE TIPS Look at the exact date of the source first and who wrote it – what was going on at that time? Always think - why has the source been made? Don’t faff around – make the first sentence of your work answers the exact question that has been asked. You must use your knowledge of what was going on at the time (in detail) to answer the question You must also use precise details from the source to answer the question (i. e. a quotation or refer to a specific bit of the picture. ) • With most source questions you must look at both sides of the argument before coming to a conclusion. • It sounds obvious but read the question carefully – do exactly what is asked. To make sure that your answer is relevant it’s a good idea to keep referring back to the question. • • •

Key Question One: Were the peace treaties of 1919 -23 fair? Topic Subject 1

Key Question One: Were the peace treaties of 1919 -23 fair? Topic Subject 1 Armistice 2 The Big Three – aims and motives 3 The Treaty of Versailles 4 The Big Three Responses to the Treaty 5 German reactions to the Treaty 6 Why was peace making so difficult? 7 Other peace treaties Work Complete I understand the topic Key Question Two: To what extent was the League of Nations a success? Topic Subject 1 Membership of the League 2 Organisation of the League 3 Border disputes of the 1920 s 4 Disarmament and International agreements 5 Success in the 1920 s 6 The Wall Street Crash and the Depression 7 Disarmament Conference 8 Invasion of Manchuria 9 Invasion of Abyssinia 10 Failure of the League of Nations Work Complete I understand the topic

Key Question Four: Why was there a ‘Red Scare’ in the USA? Topic Subject

Key Question Four: Why was there a ‘Red Scare’ in the USA? Topic Subject 1 Ideology: Communism vs. Capitalism 2 International situation 3 Rise of Anti-Communism; - The 1947 Federal Employee Loyalty Programme - Alger Hiss - The Rosenbergs - The House un-American Activities Committee - FBI and Hoover - Hollywood Blacklist 4 Support for Mc. Carthy 5 Decline of Mc. Carthy Work Complete I understand the topic Key Words and Terms …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. . …………………………………………………………………………………………………………

Key Question Five: How successful was the struggle for civil rights in the 1950

Key Question Five: How successful was the struggle for civil rights in the 1950 s? Topic Subject 1 Introduction to the USA and Jim Crow Laws 2 Political, economic and social position of African Americans in 1945 3 Impact of World War II on African Americans 4 Desegregation in education: Brown vs. Topeka Board of Education Little Rock High School 1957 5 Rosa Parks and the Montgomery Bus Boycott 6 The Civil Rights Act of 1957 and 1960 Work Complete I understand the topic Key Words and Terms …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. . …………………………………………………………………………………………………………. .

Key Question Six: Who improved civil rights in the 1960 s and 1970 s?

Key Question Six: Who improved civil rights in the 1960 s and 1970 s? Topic Subject 1 Ideas and methods of Martin Luther King 2 Ideas and methods of Malcolm X 3 Sit-ins and Freedom Rides 4 The Birmingham Protest 5 The 1963 March on Washington 6 The Freedom Summer and the Mississippi murders 7 President Kennedy 8 President Johnson 9 President Nixon 10 Black Power 11 The 1964 Civil Rights Act and the 1965 Voting Rights Act 12 Remaining social and economic inequalities of African Americans Work Complete I understand the topic Key Words and Terms ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… …. . ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… ……………………………………………………………. .

Key Question Seven: How far did other groups achieve civil rights in America? Topic

Key Question Seven: How far did other groups achieve civil rights in America? Topic Subject 1 Case Study 1: Hispanic American immigration 2 Cesar Chavez and the High school blow outs 3 Case Study 2: Native Americans 4 Radical Protest and Wounded Knee 5 The Women’s Movement 6 Opposition to the Women’s Movement Work Complete I understand the topic Key Words and Terms ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… …………………………………………………

International Relations KEY QUESTION ONE - WERE THE PEACE TREATIES OF 1919 -23 FAIR?

International Relations KEY QUESTION ONE - WERE THE PEACE TREATIES OF 1919 -23 FAIR? 4 Mark Questions • What did President Wilson hope to achieve at the Paris Peace Conference? (2003) • In what ways did the Treaty of Versailles weaken Germany’s armed forces? (2004) • What did Lloyd George hope to achieve from the Treaty of Versailles? (2005) • What land did Germany lose in the Treaty of Versailles? (2006) • What were Lloyd George's aims at Versailles? (2008) • What military restrictions did the Treaty of Versailles impose of Germany? (2009) • What were Germany’s main territorial losses under the Treaty of Versailles? (Jan 2011) • What did Wilson want to achieve at the Paris Peace Conference? (June 2011) • What did Lloyd George want to achieve at the Paris Peace Conference? (Jan 2012) • What terms of the Treaty of Versailles weakened the German economy? (Jan 2013) • What difficulties faced the ‘Big Three’ at the Paris Peace Conference? (Jun 2013) 6 Mark Questions • Explain why Clemenceau wanted the Treaty of Versailles to be harsh on Germany. (2003) • Explain why the Treaty of Versailles caused so much bitterness in Germany. (2004) • Explain why Germany was made to pay reparations. (2005) • Explain why the Allies punished Germany in the Treaty of Versailles. (2006) • Explain why Clemenceau wanted the Treaty of Versailles to punish Germany severely. (2008) • Explain why the ‘Big Three’ disagreed over how to treat Germany. (2009) • Explain why it was difficult for the ‘Big Three’ to reach agreement at the Paris Peace Conference. (Jan 2011) • Explain why Germany objected to the Treaty of Versailles. (June 2011) • Explain why the ‘Big Three’ failed to get everything they wanted at the Paris Peace Conference. (Jan 2012) • Explain why Clemenceau was dissatisfied with the Treaty of Versailles. (Jan 2013) • Explain why Wilson wanted a ‘league of nations’. (Jun 2013) 8 Mark Questions • Explain why the ‘Big Three’ had different aims at Versailles. (2007) • Explain why Clemenceau wanted Germany treated so harshly. (June 2010) • Explain why the Germans were shocked when the terms of the Treaty of Versailles were announced in May 1919. (Jan 2010) • Explain why Clemenceau and Lloyd George disagreed over how to treat Germany. (June 2012)

10 Mark Questions • Explain how the following together contributed to German hatred of

10 Mark Questions • Explain how the following together contributed to German hatred of the Treaty of Versailles: (i) the reparations settlement; (ii) the military restrictions; (iii) the loss of territory. (2003) • How far did Clemenceau, Lloyd George and Wilson share the same aims in the peace negotiations of 1919? Explain your answer. (2004) • The following were all equally important reasons why Germany hated the Treaty of Versailles: (i) limitations on its armed forces; (ii) the loss of raw materials and industries; (iii) the loss of land. Do you agree with this statement? Explain your answer, referring only to (i), (ii) and (iii). (2005) • How satisfied were the Allied leaders with the Treaty of Versailles? Explain your answer. (2006) • The following were all equally important reasons why Germany was dissatisfied with the Treaty: (i) the reduction in armed forces; (ii) the loss of territory; (iii) the losing of war guilt reparations. How far do you agree with this statement? Explain your answer referring only to (i), (ii) and (iii). (2008) • ‘Germany was treated fairly at Versailles. ’ How far do you agree with this statement? Explain your answer. (2009) • ‘The Treaty of Versailles was unfair on Germany. ’ How far do you agree with this statement? Explain your answer. (Jan 2011) • How satisfied were the ‘Big Three’ with the Treaty of Versailles? Explain your answer. (June 2011) • The following were all equally important reasons for why Germany was dissatisfied with the Treaty of Versailles: (i) war guilt; (ii) military; (iii) loss of territory. How far do you agree with this statement? Explain your answer referring only to (i), (ii) and (iii). (Jan 2012) • ‘Germany had good reasons to complain about the Treaty of Versailles’. How far do you agree with this statement? Explain your answer. (Jan 2013) • Who was more satisfied with the Treaty of Versailles: (i) Clemenceau; (ii) Lloyd George. Explain your answer. (Jun 2013)

International Relations KEY QUESTION TWO : TO WHAT EXTENT WAS THE LEAGUE OF NATIONS

International Relations KEY QUESTION TWO : TO WHAT EXTENT WAS THE LEAGUE OF NATIONS A SUCCESS? 4 Mark Questions • What were the main aims of the League of Nations when it was set up in 1920? (2004) • What was the structure of the League of Nations? (2006) • What were the main aims of the League of Nations? (2007) • What methods did the League of Nations plan to use to prevent future wars? (2009) • What were the aims of the League of Nations? (Jan 2010) • In what ways did the League of Nations aim to deal with the disputes between countries? (June 2010) • Describe how the League of Nations tried to improve living and working conditions around the world in the 1920 s. (Jan 2011) • What were the successes of the League of Nations in the 1920 s? (June 2012) • What methods were available to the League of Nations to encourage international cooperation? (Jan 2013) 6 Mark Questions • Explain why the League of Nations failed to deal successfully with the Japanese invasion of Manchuria in 1931. (2004) • Explain how the League of Nations tried to solve social problems during the 1920 s and 1930 s. (2006) • Explain how the League of nations achieved some success in the 1920 s. (2007) • Explain why the structure of the League of Nations made it weak. (2009) • Explain why the League was able to achieve some successes in the 1920 s in dealing with international disputes. (Jan 2010) • Explain why the League had some successes in the 1920 s. (June 2010) • Explain why the membership of the League of Nations was a problem. (Jan 2011) • Explain why the League was successful in the 1920 s. (June 2012) • Explain why some major powers did not join the League of Nations. (Jan 2013) 8 Mark Questions • Explain why the League of Nations failed to deal successfully with the Abyssinian crisis of 1935 -36. (2008) • Explain why the League of nations was a failure on Abyssinia in 1935 -1936. (June 2011) • Explain why the League of Nations was unsuccessful in dealing with the Manchurian Crisis. (Jan 2012) • Explain why the League of Nations was dominated by Britain and France. (Jun 2013)

10 Mark Questions • How far was the League of Nations a complete failure?

10 Mark Questions • How far was the League of Nations a complete failure? Explain your answer. (2004) • How successful was the League of Nations at keeping peace in the 1920 s and 1930 s? Explain your answer. (2006) • How far can the failure of the League in the 1930 s be blamed on the great Depression? Explain your answer. (2007) • ‘The Manchurian Crisis of 1931 was the main cause of the failure of the League of Nations. ’ How far do you agree with this statement? Explain your answer. (2009) • How far was the Great Depression responsible for the failure of the League? Explain your answer. (Jan 2010) • ‘The failure of the League of Nations was mainly due to the Abyssinian crisis’. How far do you agree with this statement? Explain your answer. (June 2010) • How successful was the League of Nations on dealing with disputes in the 1920 s and 1930 s? Explain your answer. (Jan 2011) • How far was the organisation and structure of the League responsible for its failure in the 1930 s? Explain your answer. (June 2012) • ‘The Manchurian Crisis was the main reason the League of Nations failed. ’ How far do you agree with this statement? Explain your answer. (Jan 2013)

International Relations KEY QUESTION THREE: WHY HAD INTERNATIONAL PEACE COLLAPSED BY 1939? 4 Mark

International Relations KEY QUESTION THREE: WHY HAD INTERNATIONAL PEACE COLLAPSED BY 1939? 4 Mark Questions • What were the main aims of Hitler’s foreign policy? (2003) • What was agreed at the Munich Conference in 1938? (2005) • Describe events in the Rhineland in 1936. (2007) • What were the aims of Hitler’s foreign policy? (2008) • Describe the events in the Rhineland in 1936. (Jan 2010) • What was the Sudetenland Crisis of 1938? (June 2010) • Describe Hitler’s foreign policy aims. (June 2011) • What actions had Hitler taken by 1935 to destroy the Treaty of Versailles? (Jan 2012) • Describe what happened in the Saar in 1935 as a result of the Treaty of Versailles. (June 2012) • What was the policy of appeasement followed by Britain in the 1930 s? (Jun 2013) 6 Mark Questions • Explain why Hitler wanted to take over Czechoslovakia. (2003) • Explain why Germany and the Soviet Union signed the Nazi-Soviet Pact in 1939. (2005) • Explain how Britain followed a policy of appeasement. (2007) • Explain how Hitler destroyed the Treaty of Versailles in the years up to 1938. (2008) • Explain why Hitler wanted to unite Germany and Austria. (Jan 2010) • Explain why the Nazi-Soviet Pact of August 1939 made war more likely. (June 2010) • Explain why Austria became part of Germany in 1938. (June 2011) • Explain why the events of the Saar (1935) and the Rhineland (1936) were important to Hitler. (Jan 2012) • Explain why Italy and Japan were an increasing threat to world peace in the 1930 s. (June 2012) • Explain why Hitler took action against the Treaty of Versailles between 1933 and 1938. (Jun 2013) 8 Mark Questions • Explain why Germany and the USSR signed the Nazi-Soviet Pact in 1939. (2009) • Explain why the Nazi-Soviet Pact made was more likely. (Jan 2011) • Explain why Britain followed a policy of appeasement towards Germany in the 1930 s. (Jan 2013)

10 Mark Questions • Explain how the following together contributed to the success of

10 Mark Questions • Explain how the following together contributed to the success of Germany’s foreign policy in the 1930 s: (i) Hitler’s leadership (ii) the weakness of the League of Nations (iii) the policy of appeasement. (2003) • The following were all equally important reasons why there was a world war in 1939: (i) Hitler’s aggressive foreign policy; (ii) the failure of the League of Nations; (iii) the policy of appeasement. • Do you agree with this statement? Explain your answer referring only to (i), (ii) and (iii). (2005) How far was the Nazi-Soviet Pact of 1939 responsible for causing war in Europe? Explain your answer. (2007) • The following were all equally important reasons for the outbreak of the Second World War: (i) the policy of appeasement; (ii) the Nazi-Soviet Pact of 1939; (iii) the invasion of Poland. How far do you agree with this statement? Explain your answer referring only to (i), (ii) and (iii). (2008) • How far was the Treaty of Versailles responsible for the outbreak of war in 1939? Explain your answer. (Jan 2010) • ‘The policy of appeasement was a failure. ’ How far do you agree with this statement? Explain your answer. (June 2010) • ‘The outbreak of war in 1939 was mainly due to the policy of appeasement. ’ How far do you agree with this statement? Explain your answer. (June 2011) • The following were all equally important in causing war in 1939: (i) Anschluss, March 1938; (ii) the Czechoslovakian Crisis, 1938 -39; (iii) the Nazi-Soviet Pact, August 1939. How far do you agree with this statement? Explain your answer referring only to (i), (ii) and (iii). (Jan 2012) • ‘The outbreak of war in 1939 was all Hitler’s fault. ’ How far do you agree with this statement? Explain your answer. (June 2012) • How far was the policy of appeasement justified? Explain your answer. (Jun 2013)

America Depth Study KEY QUESTION FOUR: WHY WAS THERE A ‘RED SCARE’ IN THE

America Depth Study KEY QUESTION FOUR: WHY WAS THERE A ‘RED SCARE’ IN THE USA? 4 Mark Questions • Describe the activities of Senator Mc. Carthy. (Jan 2010) • Describe the investigations into Hollywood actors, writers and producers. (Jun 2010) • Describe the impact of the Second World War on the position of African Americans. (Jan 2011) • Describe the work of the House Un-American Activities Committee. (Jun 2011) • Describe the work of the FBI and Hoover in the early 1950 s. (Jan 2012) • Describe what happened during the investigation into Alger Hiss. (Jun 2013) 6 Mark Questions • Explain why Mc. Carthy was popular with many Americas. (Jan 2010) • Explain why support for Mc. Carthyism declined. (Jun 2010) • Explain why racism remained an everyday experience for many African Americans in the USA in the 1950 s. (Jan 2011) • Explain why the international situation created a ‘Red Scare’ in America. (Jun 2011) • Explain why the House Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC) was set up. (Jan 2012) • Explain why the Rosenberg Case caused so much fear in the USA. (Jun 2013) 10 Mark Questions • How far were the actions of the Supreme Court responsible for the ending of Mc. Carthyism? Explain your answer. (Jan 2010) • ‘Events outside America were more important than developments in America in creating a fear of Communism’ How far do you agree with this statement? Explain your answer. (Jun 2010) • How important was the Montgomery Bus Boycott in the struggle for civil rights in the 1950 s? Explain your answer (Jan 2011) • How far was Mc. Carthy responsible for his own downfall? Explain your answer. (Jun 2011 ) • How far was Mc. Carthy supported by the American people up to the mid 1950 s? Explain your answer. (Jan 2012) • ‘The following were equally important in causing the Red Scare in the 1950 s: (i) Joseph Mc. Carthy; (ii) international events. ’ How far do you agree with this statement? Explain your answer referring to only (i) and (ii). ( Jun 2013)

America Depth Study KEY QUESTION FIVE: HOW SUCCESSFUL WAS THE STRUGGLE FOR CIVIL RIGHTS

America Depth Study KEY QUESTION FIVE: HOW SUCCESSFUL WAS THE STRUGGLE FOR CIVIL RIGHTS IN THE 1950 S? 4 Mark Questions • Describe ways black Americans were discriminated against in the early 1950 s. (SPEC) • Describe the education provision for African Americans before 1950. (Jun 2010) • Describe the position of Black Americans in 1945. (Jan 2012) • What were the terms of the Civil Rights Acts of 1957 and 1960? (Jun 2013) 6 Mark Questions • Explain why the Brown case in 1954 against the Topeka Board of Education was important. (SPEC) • Explain why events in Little Rock, Arkansas in 1957 were important. (Jun 2010) • Explain why the 1957 Civil Rights Act was important. (Jan 2012) • Explain why the actions of Rosa Parks were important to African Americans in the 1950 s. (Jun 2013) 10 Mark Questions • ‘The following were equally important in the struggle for civil rights in the 1950 s; (i) Little Rock High School, 1957; (ii) Rosa Parks and the Montgomery Bus Boycott 1955 – 56; (iii) The Civil Rights Act, 1957. ’ How far do you agree with this statement? Explain your answer referring only to (i), (ii) and (iii). (SPEC) • How successful was the struggle for civil rights in the 1950 s? Explain your answer. (Jun 2010) • ‘Events at Little Rock were more important than the Montgomery Bus Boycott in the struggle for civil rights in the 1950 s’ How far do you agree with this statement? Explain your answer. (Jan 2012) • ‘The following were equally important in the struggle for civil rights in the 1950 s; (i) Brown v. Topeka Board of Education in 1954; (ii) events at Little Rock High School in 1957. ’ How far do you agree with this statement? Explain your answer referring to only (i) and (ii). (Jun 2013)

America Depth Study KEY QUESTION SIX: WHO IMPROVED CIVIL RIGHTS IN THE 1960 S

America Depth Study KEY QUESTION SIX: WHO IMPROVED CIVIL RIGHTS IN THE 1960 S AND 1970 S? 4 Mark Questions • What were the aims of the Black Panther Party? (Jan 2010) • Describe events in Birmingham, Alabama in 1963. (Jun 2011) • What was the Nation of Islam Movement? (Jun 2012) • Describe what happened during the Freedom Summer of 1964. (Jan 2013) 6 Mark Questions • Explain how Martin Luther King increased public awareness of racial inequality. (Jan 2010) • Explain President Johnson’s contribution to improving civil rights. (Jun 2011) • Explain the effects of the Voting Rights Act of 1965. (Jun 2012) • Explain why the 1963 March on Washington was important. (Jan 2013) 10 Mark Questions • ‘The policies of President Kennedy and President Johnson were equally important in the move towards racial equality’ How far do you agree with this statement? Explain your answer. (Jan 2010) • ‘Malcolm X did more to improve civil rights than Martin Luther King did’ How far do you agree with this statement? Explain your answer. (Jun 2011) • ‘The following were equally important in the campaign for civil rights in the 1960 s: (i) Martin Luther King; (ii) President Johnson’. How far do you agree with this statement? Explain your answer referring only to (i) and (ii). (Jun 2012) • ‘ The following made an equal contribution to improving civil rights in the 1960 s: (i) President Kennedy; (ii) Malcolm X’ How far do you agree with this statement? Explain your answer. (Jan 2013)

America Depth Study KEY QUESTION SEVEN: HOW FAR DID OTHER GROUPS ACHIEVE CIVIL RIGHTS

America Depth Study KEY QUESTION SEVEN: HOW FAR DID OTHER GROUPS ACHIEVE CIVIL RIGHTS IN AMERICA? 4 Mark Questions • What were the effects of the Immigration Act of 1965? (SPEC) • What discrimination have Native Americans faced since 1945? (Jan 2011) • Describe the terms and effects of the Immigration Act of 1965. (Jun 2012) • Describe how abortion laws were challenged in the USA in the 1960 s and 1970 s. (Jan 2013) 6 Mark Questions • Explain the reasons why Native Americans complained about he Bureau of Indian Affairs. (SPEC) • Explain why immigration of Hispanic Americans increased in the years up to 1975. (Jan 2011) • Explain why Native Americans demonstrated at Wounded Knee in 1973. (Jun 2012) • Explain why American women campaigned for equality in the 1960 s and 1970 s. (Jan 2013) 10 Mark Questions • How successful were the Hispanic Americans in their struggle for better rights and conditions? Explain your answer. (SPEC) • Were Hispanic Americans more successful than Native Americans in their struggle for better rights and conditions? Explain your answer. (Jan 2011) • ‘The following were equally successful in gaining civil rights: (i) Native Americans; (ii) Hispanic Americans’. How far do you agree with this statement? Explain your answer referring only to (i) and (ii). (Jun 2012) • How successful had women been in their campaign to improve their rights by the mid 1970 s? Explain your answer. (Jan 2013)

What is the message of the source? (7) A cartoon published in a British

What is the message of the source? (7) A cartoon published in a British newspaper, May 19191. It is commenting on the Paris Peace Conference. Gas was a common anaesthetic used by dentists at the time.

A British cartoon about the reoccupation of the Rhineland, published in 1936. ‘Pax Germanica’

A British cartoon about the reoccupation of the Rhineland, published in 1936. ‘Pax Germanica’ means ‘Peace German style’.

What is the message of the source? (7) Why was this picture taken? (6)

What is the message of the source? (7) Why was this picture taken? (6)

How useful is this source as evidence about Martin Luther King’s contribution to the

How useful is this source as evidence about Martin Luther King’s contribution to the Civil Rights Movement? (7) What is the message of the source? (7)

How far does this source explain why there was a ‘Red Scare’ in America?

How far does this source explain why there was a ‘Red Scare’ in America? (7) Why was this cartoon published? (6) Are you surprised by this source? (7)

How useful is this source as evidence of the fight for Civil Rights by

How useful is this source as evidence of the fight for Civil Rights by Hispanic Americans? (7) What is the message of the source? (7)

Are you surprised by this source? (7) How useful is this source as evidence

Are you surprised by this source? (7) How useful is this source as evidence about the treatment of Black Americans after the Second World War? (6) What is the message of the source? (7)

Why was this cartoon published in 1962? (6) Why was this poster published in

Why was this cartoon published in 1962? (6) Why was this poster published in 1947? (6)

What is the cartoonist’s message? (7) How useful is this source as evidence for

What is the cartoonist’s message? (7) How useful is this source as evidence for why support for Mc. Carthy declined? (6)

Are you surprised by this source? (7) What is the cartoonist’s message? (7)

Are you surprised by this source? (7) What is the cartoonist’s message? (7)

Why was this poster displayed in 1965? (7) What is the cartoonist’s message? (7)

Why was this poster displayed in 1965? (7) What is the cartoonist’s message? (7) An American cartoon, published in 1947.