Figurative Language Figurative and Literal Language Literally words

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Figurative Language

Figurative Language

Figurative and Literal Language Literally: words function exactly as defined The car is blue.

Figurative and Literal Language Literally: words function exactly as defined The car is blue. He caught the football. Figuratively: figure out what it means I’ve got your back. You’re a doll. Figures of Speech

Simile Comparison of two things using “like” or “as. ” Examples: The metal twisted

Simile Comparison of two things using “like” or “as. ” Examples: The metal twisted like a ribbon. She is as sweet as candy.

Important! Using “like” or “as” doesn’t make a simile. A comparison must be made.

Important! Using “like” or “as” doesn’t make a simile. A comparison must be made. Not a Simile: I like pizza. Simile: The moon is like a pizza.

Metaphor A direct comparison of two unlike things without using “like” or “as. ”

Metaphor A direct comparison of two unlike things without using “like” or “as. ” Examples: All the world is a stage. Her heart is stone.

Personification Giving human traits or characteristics to objects or ideas. Examples: The sunlight danced.

Personification Giving human traits or characteristics to objects or ideas. Examples: The sunlight danced. Water shivers on the lake. The streets are calling me.

Hyperbole An exaggeration used to emphasize a point or to add excitement or humor.

Hyperbole An exaggeration used to emphasize a point or to add excitement or humor. Examples: I will love you forever. My house is a million miles away. I have a ton of homework.

Understatement Intentionally making a situation seem less important than it really is. The opposite

Understatement Intentionally making a situation seem less important than it really is. The opposite of hyperbole. Examples: I’ll be there in one second. This won’t hurt a bit.

Onomatopoeia • • • A word that “makes” a sound SPLAT PING SLAM POP

Onomatopoeia • • • A word that “makes” a sound SPLAT PING SLAM POP POW

Idiom • Expression in which the intended meaning is different from the literal meaning.

Idiom • Expression in which the intended meaning is different from the literal meaning. A saying that isn’t meant to be taken literally. Example: • Don’t be a stick in the mud! • You’re the apple of my eye. • I have an ace up my sleeve.

Oxymoron • When two words are put together that contradict each other. “Opposites” Examples:

Oxymoron • When two words are put together that contradict each other. “Opposites” Examples: • Jumbo Shrimp • Pretty Ugly • Freezer Burn

Alliteration a number of words, having the same first consonant sound, occur close together

Alliteration a number of words, having the same first consonant sound, occur close together in a series. “The fair breeze blew, the white foam flew, The furrow followed free; We were the first that ever burst Into that silent sea. ” She sells seashells by the seashore. Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers.

Imagery The use of figurative language to represent objects, actions and ideas in such

Imagery The use of figurative language to represent objects, actions and ideas in such a way that it appeals to our physical senses: sight, touch, smell, taste, and sound. He whiffed the aroma of brewed coffee. The girl ran her hands on a soft satin fabric.

Irony The use of words where the meaning is the opposite of their usual

Irony The use of words where the meaning is the opposite of their usual meaning or what is expected to happen. It may also be a situation that may end up in quite a different way than what is generally anticipated.

Symbolism The use of symbols to represent ideas or qualities. Then took the other

Symbolism The use of symbols to represent ideas or qualities. Then took the other [road], as just as fair, / And having perhaps the better claim, / Because it was grassy and wanted wear; This road symbolizes the poet’s choice to go down a less common path in life, and not just the literal path in the forest.

Quiz 1. I will put an example of figurative language on the board. 2.

Quiz 1. I will put an example of figurative language on the board. 2. You will identify whether it is an simile, metaphor, personification, hyperbole, idiom, onomatopoeia, oxymoron, understatement, or alliteration. 3. You can use your notes.

1 He drew a line as straight as an arrow.

1 He drew a line as straight as an arrow.

2 Can I see you for a second?

2 Can I see you for a second?

3 The sun was beating down on me.

3 The sun was beating down on me.

4 A flag wags like a fishhook there in the sky.

4 A flag wags like a fishhook there in the sky.

5 I'd rather take baths with a man-eating shark, or wrestle a lion alone

5 I'd rather take baths with a man-eating shark, or wrestle a lion alone in the dark, eat spinach and liver, pet ten porcupines, than tackle the homework, my teacher assigns.

6 Ravenous and savage from its long polar journey, the North Wind is searching

6 Ravenous and savage from its long polar journey, the North Wind is searching for food—

7 Can I have one of your chips?

7 Can I have one of your chips?

8. • The clouds smiled down at me.

8. • The clouds smiled down at me.

9. • SPLAT!

9. • SPLAT!

10. • She is as sweet as candy

10. • She is as sweet as candy

11. • I could sleep forever!

11. • I could sleep forever!

12. • I used to have a fear of hurdles, but I got over

12. • I used to have a fear of hurdles, but I got over it.

13. • The wheat field was a sea of gold.

13. • The wheat field was a sea of gold.

14. • The streets called to him.

14. • The streets called to him.

15. • POP!

15. • POP!

16. • She was dressed to the nines.

16. • She was dressed to the nines.

17. • Your face is killing me!

17. • Your face is killing me!

18. • She was as white as a ghost.

18. • She was as white as a ghost.