Features of Huckaback weaves The weave is characterized

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Features of Huckaback weaves • The weave is characterized by a rough surface. •

Features of Huckaback weaves • The weave is characterized by a rough surface. • It is produced by floating threads in groups arranged on a plain weave basis. • Repeat: Twice of an odd number: 10 X 10 • With these constructions hardwearing and extremely thick, moisture absorbing fabrics are produced. • 10 X 10 is the widely used repeat size. • The weave can be divided diagonally into equal parts.

Huckaback Face side 11/24/2020 Back side Bangladesh University of Textiles (www. emdadsir. yolasite. com)

Huckaback Face side 11/24/2020 Back side Bangladesh University of Textiles (www. emdadsir. yolasite. com) 2

Uses of Huckaback weaves • Linen and cotton yarns are commonly used and in

Uses of Huckaback weaves • Linen and cotton yarns are commonly used and in coarser qualities they are particularly suitable for hand towels, glass cloths, roller towels. . • Quiltings, shirtings, dress wear and table linen are produced in finer qualities.

Features of Mock leno weaves 1. It is open perforated weaves like leno fabrics.

Features of Mock leno weaves 1. It is open perforated weaves like leno fabrics. 2. It is produced in the ordinary way without special leno shafts. 3. The similarity of this weave to the Huckaback is quite obvious, but the method of denting is different, as it is necessary to encourage thread grouping. 4. The weave is arranged in groups of equal or unequal sizes. 5. Even number repeat size is normally used. Minimum repeat: 6 x 6

Uses of Mock leno weaves • Fabrics produced with this weave are used for

Uses of Mock leno weaves • Fabrics produced with this weave are used for embroidery cloths, canvas cloths and light weight window curtains, but it is also popular in combination with other weaves particularly plain, in table linen, brocades, blouses and dress wear. Brocade : A rich fabric, usually silk, woven with a raised pattern, typically with gold or silver thread.

Honeycomb weaves • The term is applied to weaves which resembles honeycomb cells. •

Honeycomb weaves • The term is applied to weaves which resembles honeycomb cells. • The cellular formations appear square in the cloth. • They are formed by some ends and picks interlacing tighter than others and therefore developing a higher tension. • To give a cellular appearance on a square pattern, both warp and weft floats are progressively shortened and lengthened. • Some times the weave is called waffle or waffle Pique.

Two types of Honeycomb weave • Ordinary Honeycomb weave • Brighton Honeycomb weave

Two types of Honeycomb weave • Ordinary Honeycomb weave • Brighton Honeycomb weave

Characteristics of ordinary honeycomb: • Alternate raised and sunk diamond shaped area which give

Characteristics of ordinary honeycomb: • Alternate raised and sunk diamond shaped area which give the effect of a honeycomb. • Both sides of the fabric look the same and the surface of the fabric is rough. • Weave contains long floats of warp and weft yarns • Repeat size : number of ends and picks may be equal or unequal but multiple of two. • Normally pointed drafting systems are used.

Honeycomb weave 11/24/2020 Bangladesh University of Textiles (www. emdadsir. yolasite. com) 9

Honeycomb weave 11/24/2020 Bangladesh University of Textiles (www. emdadsir. yolasite. com) 9

16 x 16 ordinary honeycomb 16 x 16 ordinary honeycomb

16 x 16 ordinary honeycomb 16 x 16 ordinary honeycomb

Main features of Brighton honeycomb: More honeycomb cells of varying sizes. Rough surfaces Repeat

Main features of Brighton honeycomb: More honeycomb cells of varying sizes. Rough surfaces Repeat number will be multiple of four. Longest float of diamond will be one less than half the number of threads in the repeat. Example: If the repeat 12 X 12 , then long float will be 12/2 -1=5 • Both sides of the fabric look same as ordinary honeycomb. • Straight drafting system is used • •

Features of Bedford cord design: • The weave produces longitudinal warp lines with fine

Features of Bedford cord design: • The weave produces longitudinal warp lines with fine sunken lines between the cord • Warp face cloth • Two or more cords are produced in one repeat • Ends and picks are always even number • Picks number always four. Eg: 12 X 4, 16 X 4 etc.

Types of Bedford cord 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Plain face Bedford cord Wadded

Types of Bedford cord 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Plain face Bedford cord Wadded Bedford cord Crepon bedford cord Bedford cord arranged with alternate picks. Twill face Bedford cord

Main features of Pique weave • A typical pique structure consists of a plain

Main features of Pique weave • A typical pique structure consists of a plain face fabric composed of one series of warp & weft threads and a series of back or stitching warp threads. • Continuous sunken lines or cuts i. e. cords are run horizontally in the cloth. • One cord is produced per repeat. • Normally skip drafting system is used to produce this weave

Types of pique weave There are four types of pique weaves: 1. Ordinary pique

Types of pique weave There are four types of pique weaves: 1. Ordinary pique or welt structure/ Loose back without wadding picks. 2. Weft wadded welts/ Loose back wadded welt structure. 3. Fast back welt or pique structure 4. Waved pique structure

Ordinary welts • The number of face picks in the width of a cord

Ordinary welts • The number of face picks in the width of a cord is varied according to requirements, but usually the number of consecutive picks that are unstitched should not exceed twelve. • The order of warp thread arrangement, which is always one face or ground and one stitching or back end and one face end (g-s-g). Or in the proportion of two face to one stitching end.

Wadded welts • In order to increase the prominence of the unstitched portions i.

Wadded welts • In order to increase the prominence of the unstitched portions i. e. horizontal cords of the cloth, it is customary to insert wadded picks between the tight back stitching ends and the slack face fabric. • Usually the wadding weft is thicker than the ground weft and is inserted tow picks at a place. • Thick wadding picks which are inserted in pairs, are supplemented by single wadding picks of the face weft.

Wadded welts • The stitching ends are placed on a separate beam which is

Wadded welts • The stitching ends are placed on a separate beam which is very highly weighted, where as the face ends are kept at moderate tension. • At intervals the tight stitching ends are interwoven into the plain face texture

Cord effect in the cloth • By using thicker yarn • By producing a.

Cord effect in the cloth • By using thicker yarn • By producing a. Bedford cord weave • b. Pique weave

Sponge weave • The number of ends and picks are always equal. • 10

Sponge weave • The number of ends and picks are always equal. • 10 x 10 is the smallest repeat size of this weave. • Straight drafting system is used to produce this weave. • Low twisted and coarser yarns are used to produce this fabric. So the fabric is very soft and absorbent. • Longest float of the diamond=

Sponge weave • It is reversible cloth like honeycomb. • Honeycomb weave produce one

Sponge weave • It is reversible cloth like honeycomb. • Honeycomb weave produce one cell on both sides but in this case number of produced cell depends on the number of repeat size. • The weave is produced on the sateen base.

Extra warp design 1. The productivity of a loom is greater because only one

Extra warp design 1. The productivity of a loom is greater because only one series of picks is inserted. 2. No special picking box and take-up motions are required. 3. There is theoretically no limit to the number of colors that can be introduced. 4. In the intermittent arrangement of the extra ends either spotted or stripe patterns can be formed.

Extra warp design • Two or more warp beams may be required instead of

Extra warp design • Two or more warp beams may be required instead of one. • Stronger yarn is required for the weave. • Extra ends are subjected to greater tension during weaving. • If the extra threads have to be removed from the underside of the cloth, it is more difficult and costly to cut away extra ends.

Tubular fabric • Concept: Tubular weave is a kind of double weave which both

Tubular fabric • Concept: Tubular weave is a kind of double weave which both selvedges are joined. • Application: Tubular fabrics are used for fire hoses, seamless bags, sacks, tubular shaped filter, covering Cylindrical objects, artificial vessels, etc. Various dimensions can be produced.

Basic principle of tubular cloth production • A tubular fabric consists of two distinct

Basic principle of tubular cloth production • A tubular fabric consists of two distinct face and back fabrics in which selvedges are joined, because the shuttle flies left to right, inserting the face pick and then flies in the opposite direction, inserting the back pick. When the pick is inserted into the face fabric all the threads of the back warp should be lowered. And when the pick is inserted into the back fabric all the face warp threads should be raised.

Seamless bag production • While producing seamless bags, the shuttle inserts two face picks

Seamless bag production • While producing seamless bags, the shuttle inserts two face picks passing from left to right and from right to left. Then two back picks are inserted. As a result, only the left selvedges of the face and back fabrics are joined, forming the bottom of the bag. The sides of the bag are formed by making a short length of the double fabric and then again a whole width of the bag.

Uses of tubular fabrics

Uses of tubular fabrics

Uses of tubular fabrics

Uses of tubular fabrics

Main points of designing a tubular fabric • (1) Selection of base weaves. The

Main points of designing a tubular fabric • (1) Selection of base weaves. The face weave and back weave should be same. And the structure should be simple. The following weaves can be used as the bases: plain weave, 2/2(2) hopsack, 2/2 weft ribs, twill, etc. The shift in weft direction should be constant, otherwise, the selvedges are not evenness. • (2) Arrangements of face and back threads. Arrangements in warp direction should be 1: 1; and in weft direction must be 1: 1, otherwise, the selvedges can not joined properly. • (3) Calculation of the total number of ends. To achieve a perfect continuation of the weave from face to back and vice versa, certain rules for the calculation of the total number of ends in fabric have to be observed.

Stitched double cloths • Double cloths are fabrics in which there at least two

Stitched double cloths • Double cloths are fabrics in which there at least two series of warp and weft threads each of which is engaged primarily in producing its own layer of cloth. • The two layers may be only loosely connected together. Each layer may be readily identified as a different entity or they may be so intricately stitched or tied together that they appear to form a complex single structure.

Purpose of this construction • For the improvement of thermal insulation value of a

Purpose of this construction • For the improvement of thermal insulation value of a fabric. • The capacity for producing intricate effects dependent upon either color or structural changes.

Classification of double cloth 1. Self stitched double cloth 2. Center stitched double cloth

Classification of double cloth 1. Self stitched double cloth 2. Center stitched double cloth 3. Double cloth stitched by thread interchange. 4. Double cloth stitched by cloth interchange 5. Alternate single ply and double ply construction

Cloths Made in the Plain Weave • • A partial list of plain weave

Cloths Made in the Plain Weave • • A partial list of plain weave fabrics are as follows: • 1. Cottons: Gingham, percale, voile, plissé crepe, batiste, calico, chambray, cheese-cloth, chintz, crash, cretonne, muslin sheeting, cambric, lawn, organdy, shantung, unbleached muslin, scrim, buckram, canvas, flannelette. • 2. Linens: Handkerchief linen, art linen, rash toweling, cambric, dress • 3. Nylons and other man-made fibered fabrics: Organdy, lingerie crepe, shantung, taffeta, shirting ( many of these constructions are also made in blends with natural yarns and with other man-made fibered yarns). • 4. Rayons and/or acetates: Taffeta, georgette, flat crepe, seersucker, • 5. Silks. Taffeta, organza, voile, Canton crepe, crepe de Chine, flat crepe, chiffon, shantung, silk shirting, broad cloth, China silk. • 6. Wools. Homespun, challis, crepe, batiste, some tweeds, voile.