Eye Protection scenarios No Eye Protection Compressed air

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Eye Protection scenarios No Eye Protection: Compressed air used to cool and instrument blew

Eye Protection scenarios No Eye Protection: Compressed air used to cool and instrument blew Benzoic acid crystals into the eyes of a visiting undergraduate student – Before 2007. An Eye/Facewash was used for 15 minutes. Inadequate Eye Protection: A Syringe filter popped off of a syringe, when force was applied. Nanoparticles sprayed upwards underneath the safety glasses, an Eyewash was used for 15 Minutes – 2016. Superior Eye Protection: A student was sprayed with nitric acid on the bottom half of her face, while filtering samples. She rinsed off her face in the eyewash for 15 minutes – 2016.

Eye Protection Impact resistant safety glasses and chemical splash safety goggles provide different levels

Eye Protection Impact resistant safety glasses and chemical splash safety goggles provide different levels of protection… ALWAYS Wear Eye Protection when in any lab, especially when working with: Chemicals, Glassware, Heat, and Flying Particles Safety Glasses SAFETY GLASSES: One can pass finger between the device and the face. Safety glasses of the “impact type” (directly ventilated) are not suitable for chemical splash protection. GOGGLES: Are required in Undergraduate Teaching labs in the University of Pittsburgh Department of Chemistry (per a 2008 Memo practically since 1996) Goggles Are recommended when using Hazardous Chemicals E. g. , Nitric Acid Appropriate eye protection is defined by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) Z-87. 1 standard.