Evolution in the incidence of monoclonal gammopathies in

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Evolution in the incidence of monoclonal gammopathies in a southern Spain tertiary hospital in

Evolution in the incidence of monoclonal gammopathies in a southern Spain tertiary hospital in the last thirteen years J. Maesa 1, M. de Toro-Crespo 1, P. Menendez-Valladares 1, N. Barbosa 2, I. Rodriguez-Martin 1, C. Bermudo-Guitarte 1. 1 Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena, Sevilla, Spain, 2 The Binding Site, Barcelona, Spain Background Monoclonal gammopathy (MG) is the most common plasma cells disorder. It affects around 3% of the population older than 50 years. The great majority of MG are monoclonal gammopathies of undetermined significance (MGUS), which is a premalignant disorder defined to present less than 3 g/d. L of serum monoclonal protein, less than 10% of clonal bone marrow cells and absence of end-organ damage. MGUS is easily detected in laboratory tests and should be monitored because 1% of MGUS per year progress to Multiple Myeloma (MM). Material and Methods In a retrospective study, we determined the total number of MG and its different types diagnosed in our hospital between 2003 and 2015. We calculated the incidence per 100. 000/year of MGUS and MM, with 95% confidence intervals. Our reference population, in 2015, was 480. 851. Incidence of MGUS and MM is not always easy to determine, but there is a general perception of an increasing incidence that can be attributed to different causes. One is the aging of the population. Another reason is the contribution of clinical laboratories, which count on new determinations (free light chains) or improved techniques in electrophoresis, nephelometry or immunofixation, allowing them to support the diagnose of MGUS that years before remained undiagnosed. The aim of this study is to determine the incidence of MGUS, MM and its different types in the reference population of a tertiary hospital in southern Spain between 2003 and 2015. a. b. Figure 2: Variation in incidence per 100. 000 between 2003 and 2015: a. Monoconal Gammopathies of Undetermined Signifiance. b. Multiple Myeloma. Figure 1: Total number of Monoclonal Gammopathies diagnosed in our hospital between 2003 and 2015, stratified in its different types. Each color corresponds to a MG type. Conclusion The aging of population and the higher sensitivity of laboratory techniques for diagnosing of MG is reflected in the incidence of MGUS, which increased from 17. 04 cases per 100. 000 in 2003 to 35. 00. MM incidence in our area did not increased in parallel.