Erosion Sofia Orozco Erosion What is Erosion Erosion

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Erosion Sofia Orozco

Erosion Sofia Orozco

Erosion

Erosion

What is Erosion? • Erosion is the process by which the surface of the

What is Erosion? • Erosion is the process by which the surface of the Earth gets worn down. Erosion can be caused by natural elements such as wind and glacial ice. But anyone who has ever seen a picture of the Grand Canyon knows that nothing beats the slow steady movement of water when it comes to changing the

Igneous Rock

Igneous Rock

What is igneous rock? • Igneous rock is one of three basic kinds of

What is igneous rock? • Igneous rock is one of three basic kinds of rock, along with sedimentary and metamorphic rock. The word igneous comes from the Latin word, ignis, which means fire. Igneous rocks are rocks which were once molten inside the earth. There are over 700 different kinds of igneous rock. Two well known examples are granite and basalt. All of the many different kinds of igneous rock can be subdivided into one of two categories: intrusive rock and extrusive rock. Intrusive rock hardens and forms below the earth’s surface. Extrusive rock forms on the Earth’s surface. Intrusive rock is also called plutonic rock, named after Pluto, the Roman god of the Underworld (because Plutonic rock forms beneath the earth’s surface). Extrusive rock is also called volcanic rock, named after Vulcan, the Roman god of fire, because volcanic rock is spewed onto the earth’s surface by volcanic activity which is also named after Vulcan. There it cools becoming

Metamorphic rock

Metamorphic rock

What is metamorphic rock? • Metamorphic rock is the result of the transformation of

What is metamorphic rock? • Metamorphic rock is the result of the transformation of an existing rock type, the protolith, in a process called metamorphism, which means "change in form". The protolith is subjected to heat and pressure (temperatures greater than 150 to 200 °C and pressures of 1500 bars[1]) causing profound physical and/or chemical change. The protolith may be sedimentary rock, igneous rock or another older metamorphic rock. Metamorphic rocks make up a large part of the Earth's crust and are classified by texture and by chemical and mineral assemblage (metamorphic facies). They may be formed simply by being deep beneath the Earth's surface, subjected to high temperatures and the great pressure of the rock layers above it. They can be formed by tectonic processes such as continental collisions which cause horizontal pressure, friction and distortion. They are also formed when rock is heated up by the intrusion of hot molten rock called magma from the Earth's interior. • The study of metamorphic rocks (now exposed at the Earth's surface following erosion and uplift) provides us with very valuable information about the temperatures

Sedimentary rock

Sedimentary rock

What is sediment rock? • Someday, the sand that you see at the beach

What is sediment rock? • Someday, the sand that you see at the beach might become a sedimentary rock! • The sand at the beach is made of little pieces of rock that broke off larger rocks. These little broken pieces are called sediment. There are many types of sediment including sand, mud, pebbles, and even dust. It takes a very long time, thousands and thousands of years, but sediments can form a rock if they become stuck together. • Sedimentary rocks record what environments were like a long time ago. Fossils are sometimes preserved in sedimentary rocks too. They record what animals and plants were like thousands or millions of years ago. • Some types of sedimentary rocks are made of special sediment. The particles do not come from other rocks. They can be crystals that form from chemicals in seawater, like in chemical rocks, fossils of ancient plants and animals, like in organic

Rock cycle

Rock cycle

What is rock cycle? • The rock cycle is a fundamental concept in geology

What is rock cycle? • The rock cycle is a fundamental concept in geology that describes the dynamic transitions through geologic time among the three main rock types: sedimentary, metamorphic, and igneous. As the diagram to the right illustrates, each type of rock is altered or destroyed when it is forced out of its equilibrium conditions. An igneous rock such as basalt may break down and dissolve when exposed to the atmosphere, or melt as it is subducted under a continent. Due to the driving forces of the rock cycle, plate tectonics and the water cycle, rocks do not remain in equilibrium and are forced to change as they encounter new environments. The rock

Chemical weathering

Chemical weathering

What is chemical weathering? • Involves the breakdown of the primary minerals in the

What is chemical weathering? • Involves the breakdown of the primary minerals in the rock to new secondary minerals that are more stable in the surface environment or to material that may be carried away in solution. The extent to which the breakdown has occurred may be given as the index of weathering, usually expressed as the ratio of a common element like aluminum or iron present in the secondary mineral compared to the total present in the soil. Water is the essential agent in chemical weathering, either reacting with the minerals directly or carrying dissolved species which themselves react with the minerals. The reactions involved are many

Physical weathering

Physical weathering

What is physical weathering • Outlines the increase in surface area that results from

What is physical weathering • Outlines the increase in surface area that results from physical weathering. Students have the opportunity to calculate surface area increases for two different scenarios: when the shape of weathered blocks is cubical and when the shape of the block is plate-like. • : A Flash annotated slide show of six examples of physical or mechanical weathering. Listed are three examples of frost wedging and three examples of root wedging. Clicking on each example yields

Rock races sand Potti Clay grav ng soil el soil Trial 4 sec 56

Rock races sand Potti Clay grav ng soil el soil Trial 4 sec 56 se 7 sec 1 c Trial 4 sec 58 se 8 sec 1 sec 2 c

Size of particles I think that 1 the gravel will deposit first. And 2

Size of particles I think that 1 the gravel will deposit first. And 2 sand because it took 4 sec to go down. Then clay soil will deposit next with 7 sec. At last potting soil with 58 sec.

Inclined to Erode? Height of stream table 4 cm Number of grid squares covered

Inclined to Erode? Height of stream table 4 cm Number of grid squares covered 8 cm Erosion ranking highest to lowest 3 8 cm 10 cm 2 12 cm 16 cm 1