Energy Sources Nonrenewable Renewable and Inexhaustible Principles of

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Energy Sources Nonrenewable, Renewable, and Inexhaustible Principles of Engineering © 2012 Project Lead The

Energy Sources Nonrenewable, Renewable, and Inexhaustible Principles of Engineering © 2012 Project Lead The Way, Inc.

Energy Sources Energy: The ability to do work Energy sources are defined as –

Energy Sources Energy: The ability to do work Energy sources are defined as – Nonrenewable – Renewable – Inexhaustible The SUN is the original source of almost all energy sources on Earth.

Nonrenewable Energy Sources that cannot be replaced once used Fossil Fuels • Coal •

Nonrenewable Energy Sources that cannot be replaced once used Fossil Fuels • Coal • Oil • Natural Gas Alternative Energy: Any fuel that is not identified as a fossil fuel

Nonrenewable Energy Sources that cannot be replaced once used Uranium • Nuclear energy (fission)

Nonrenewable Energy Sources that cannot be replaced once used Uranium • Nuclear energy (fission) • 20% of the world’s electricity comes from nuclear power

Renewable Energy Sources that can be replaced once used • Animals • Food •

Renewable Energy Sources that can be replaced once used • Animals • Food • Biomass – Biofuel • Ethanol • Methanol U. S. Department of Energy

Inexhaustible Energy Sources Hydroelectric Tidal

Inexhaustible Energy Sources Hydroelectric Tidal

Inexhaustible Energy Sources Geothermal U. S. Department of Energy

Inexhaustible Energy Sources Geothermal U. S. Department of Energy

Inexhaustible Energy Sources Wind U. S. Department of Energy

Inexhaustible Energy Sources Wind U. S. Department of Energy

Inexhaustible Energy Sources Solar U. S. Department of Energy PS 10

Inexhaustible Energy Sources Solar U. S. Department of Energy PS 10

Image Resources Microsoft, Inc. (n. d. ). Clip art. Retrieved January 10, 2008, from

Image Resources Microsoft, Inc. (n. d. ). Clip art. Retrieved January 10, 2008, from http: //office. microsoft. com/enus/clipart/default. aspx U. S. Department of Energy. (n. d. ). Retrieved April 16, 2008, from http: //www. doe. gov/