eGovernment Situating Canada Maturity of eGovernment Delivery l

  • Slides: 21
Download presentation
e-Government Situating Canada

e-Government Situating Canada

Maturity of e-Government Delivery l e-government maturity (Accenture) – service maturity l breadth of

Maturity of e-Government Delivery l e-government maturity (Accenture) – service maturity l breadth of service – what proportion of services offered online l depth of service – publish • passive/passive – interactive • active/passive – transactive • active/active

Maturity of e-Government Delivery l e-government maturity – service maturity – delivery maturity l

Maturity of e-Government Delivery l e-government maturity – service maturity – delivery maturity l very low value added – little evidence of coordinated development between agencies l low value added – single points of access, customer relationship management techniques, customer focused websites – development is fragmented

Maturity of e-Government Delivery l e-government maturity – service maturity – delivery maturity l

Maturity of e-Government Delivery l e-government maturity – service maturity – delivery maturity l marginal value-added – progress being made to make gov’t web presence more sophisticated but still at a rudimentary stage l moderate value-added – good potential shown in developing a sophisticated Whole of Government customerfocused web presence

Assessing the Trend. . . l l “Canada is one of the pioneers of

Assessing the Trend. . . l l “Canada is one of the pioneers of e-government and an early adopter of Internet technology. ” UK Central IT Unit, 2000. “Canada is aiming to become the most connected nation in the world with all key government services fully on-line by 2004. ” UK Central IT Unit, 2000. “Canada is already one of the most connected nations in the world. ” UK Central IT Unit, 2000. “Canada has long been an exemplar of electronic service delivery. ” UK Central IT Unit, 2000

Assessing the Trend. . . l “Is there a trend towards e-government? I think

Assessing the Trend. . . l “Is there a trend towards e-government? I think there is. Is it a strong trend? I wouldn’t say so. What we’re seeing is the beginning, and we have a long way to go. ” Tony Grant Managing Partner Andersen Consulting l how far e-government goes will depend in part on the motivation (drivers) of e-government adoption

Motivation of Government demands from citizens l efficiency and effectiveness l – gov’t will

Motivation of Government demands from citizens l efficiency and effectiveness l – gov’t will be smarter and faster as a result of sharing information across departmental boundaries – HOWEVER. . . l large up-front investment l costs to be first – bear greater risk – obsolete technology which was initially more expensive

Motivation of Government l citizen demands l efficiency and effectiveness l cost-savings l political

Motivation of Government l citizen demands l efficiency and effectiveness l cost-savings l political support for e-government strategy – “Around the world, governments are committing to deliver services on-line as a policy imperative, not based on dollars-andcents benefit calculation. ” PWC 2001

Motivation of Government l “We will make the information and knowledge infrastructure accessible to

Motivation of Government l “We will make the information and knowledge infrastructure accessible to all Canadians by the year 2000, thereby making Canada the most connected nation in the world. This will provide individuals, schools, libraries, small and large businesses, rural and Aboriginal communities, public institutions, and all levels of government with new opportunities for learning, interacting, transacting business and developing their social and economic potential. ” Throne Speech 1997

Motivation of Governments l “The Government will become a model user of information technology

Motivation of Governments l “The Government will become a model user of information technology and the Internet. By 2004, our goal is to be known around the world as the government most connected to its citizens, with Canadians able to access all government information and services online at the time and place of their choosing. ” Throne Speech 1999

Motivation of Government l “Improving Canada’s information infrastructure will support the exchange of ideas

Motivation of Government l “Improving Canada’s information infrastructure will support the exchange of ideas and the conduct of business over computer networks, connect Canadians to the information highway, and accelerate the adoption of electronic commerce. The Government will take steps to make Canada a centre of excellence for electronic commerce and encourage its use throughout the economy; reintroduce legislation to protect personal and business information in the digital world and to recognize electronic signatures; and provide increased access to high-speed Internet service for classrooms and libraries…” Throne Speech 1999

Motivation of Government l citizen demands l efficiency and effectiveness l cost-savings l political

Motivation of Government l citizen demands l efficiency and effectiveness l cost-savings l political support for e-government strategy – developing social potential – e-democracy – economic development strategy l model user

e-Government Policy in Canada l Government On-Line – “commitment to make the Government of

e-Government Policy in Canada l Government On-Line – “commitment to make the Government of Canada the most electronically connected government in the world to its citizens by 2004 and provide Canadians with electronic access to federal information and services. ” – including. . . one-stop access points l information organized by theme or type of activity l

e-Government Policy in Canada l Government On-Line Commitments – choice e-services will “complement, not

e-Government Policy in Canada l Government On-Line Commitments – choice e-services will “complement, not replace, other options” l e-services to expand range of choice (in-person, telephone, mail) l – privacy how government uses information (protected from unauthorized use and disclosure) l security l – accessibility ensuring Internet access for all Canadians who want it l Connecting Canadians l

e-Government Policy in Canada l Government On-Line strategy – services traditionally designed from the

e-Government Policy in Canada l Government On-Line strategy – services traditionally designed from the inside out l greater emphasis on designing from the outside in (seamless access) l – technological infrastructure capacity to handle greatly increased transaction l security l – people preparing the public service at all levels for e-service delivery l IT recruiting l

e-Government Policy in Canada l Government On-Line – Looking Forward – live on-line (real

e-Government Policy in Canada l Government On-Line – Looking Forward – live on-line (real time) support services – applying for benefits on-line l EI, Child Tax Credit, veteran’s allowances – filing taxes on-line l personal, corporate – on-line passport renewals – on-line National Park reservations – one stop access points (or portals) with information an services organized according to activity/needs l seniors, consumers, small business

e-Government – Potential Uses Canada 2001 Canada 2004 e-information e-services (basic) e-services (advanced) e-input

e-Government – Potential Uses Canada 2001 Canada 2004 e-information e-services (basic) e-services (advanced) e-input (from citizens) e-democracy

e-Government Policy in Canada l Government On-Line – e-democracy? – “The on-line channel can

e-Government Policy in Canada l Government On-Line – e-democracy? – “The on-line channel can create opportunities for enhanced citizen engagement. ” – “. . . exciting potential for greater citizen involvement in public policy-making, and greater responsiveness from public figures and institutions. ” – however. . . no systematic discussion of citizen input (prospects and perils) l does not outline any concrete examples of any expected increased citizen input through IT l

The Crossing Boundaries Project l concern with treating e-government as e- services (in contrast

The Crossing Boundaries Project l concern with treating e-government as e- services (in contrast to Gov’t On-Line initiative) – “Democratic government is about more than the delivery of services. [. . . ] Thinking of egovernment mainly as a tool for better service delivery could have serious consequences for governance and democracy. ” – Why? ?

The Crossing Boundaries Project l concern with treating e-government as e- services (in contrast

The Crossing Boundaries Project l concern with treating e-government as e- services (in contrast to Gov’t On-Line initiative) – lost potential – potential is for more than services l assumes that this is good (which is an open question) – unintended (and unplanned) development changes in service delivery have effects on other values and interactions in other parts of the system l provision of elements of e-government drives demand for other elements l

The Crossing Boundaries Project l concern with treating e-government as e- services – lost

The Crossing Boundaries Project l concern with treating e-government as e- services – lost potential – potential is for more than services l assumes that this is good (which is an open question) – unintended (and unplanned) development do not want to arrive at e-democracy without having considered what we want it to look like l we have to consider the long-term implications for democracy now l