E Learning Digital Libraries and the Role of

  • Slides: 24
Download presentation
E- Learning, Digital Libraries, and the Role of Academic Libraries in the 21 st

E- Learning, Digital Libraries, and the Role of Academic Libraries in the 21 st Century Christine L. Borgman Professor & Presidential Chair in Information Studies University of California, Los Angeles

John Kemeny’s Challenge to Libraries Symposium at 50 th Anniversary of Baker Library, 1978:

John Kemeny’s Challenge to Libraries Symposium at 50 th Anniversary of Baker Library, 1978: “One of the keys to the subject of computers and libraries lies in discovering how the computer might play a role and do it in such a way that the love of the material you are working with can still be there. ” (p 74) 2

Responding to Kemeny’s challenge • How can computers be used in libraries to sustain

Responding to Kemeny’s challenge • How can computers be used in libraries to sustain “the love of the material”? • How can libraries use computers to enhance the love of the “material”? • How can libraries use computers to enhance teaching and scholarship? – – New media New students New faculty New librarians 3

4

4

The new students • Technology for learning and entertainment – – – Information retrieval:

The new students • Technology for learning and entertainment – – – Information retrieval: Google Reading: WWW, E-books Writing: Word processors, web sites Arithmetic: Graphing calculators, Mathlab Music: Kazaa, Napster, CD-RW, MP 3 players Photos: Digital cameras Navigation: Global positioning systems Communication: Mobile phones Entertainment: DVDs, Networked computer games Instruction: course web sites Science labs: computer based dissection, experiments 5

The new learning • Learning can be more like scholarship – Access to primary

The new learning • Learning can be more like scholarship – Access to primary information sources – Inquiry learning - learn by doing, asking questions – Navigate, explore, construct and test hypotheses • Students can learn to “think like, ” “work like”… – – Scientists Social scientists Humanists Practitioners… 6

Digital libraries • Digital libraries are systems that support searching, use, and creation of

Digital libraries • Digital libraries are systems that support searching, use, and creation of content • Digital libraries are institutions with people, digital collections, and services 7

Digital libraries for learning • Content: Primary sources in digital form – Historical records

Digital libraries for learning • Content: Primary sources in digital form – Historical records – Social science datasets – Geo-spatial data • Infrastructure: Distributed access from classrooms, offices, dorms, and reach of wireless networks • Tools and services: search, select, manipulate, visualize, display, and create digital resources 8

Scholarly and teaching practices • Information technologies faculty use for scholarship – Digital libraries

Scholarly and teaching practices • Information technologies faculty use for scholarship – Digital libraries – Tools for selecting, organization, manipulating digital resources • Information technologies faculty use for instruction – – Textbooks Chalkboards Overhead projectors Slides 9

Two case studies • Alexandria Digital Earth Proto. Type (ADEPT) – UC-Santa Barbara, UCLA

Two case studies • Alexandria Digital Earth Proto. Type (ADEPT) – UC-Santa Barbara, UCLA – NSF Digital Libraries Initiative, 1999 -2004 – Incorporate geographic digital libraries into undergraduate instruction • Center for Embedded Networked Sensing (CENS) – UCLA, USC, Caltech, UC-Riverside, CSU-LA – NSF Science and Technology Center, 2002 -2012 – Incorporate networked sensing data into grades 7 -12 instruction in biology and physics 10

ADEPT: Geographical digital libraries for undergraduates • Geography relies on primary data sources –

ADEPT: Geographical digital libraries for undergraduates • Geography relies on primary data sources – Satellite observations – Physical observations – Remote sensing • Geography studies dynamic processes • Educational standards for geographic knowledge are informationbased: – – – asking geographic questions acquiring geographic information organizing geographic information analyzing geographic information answering geographic questions 11

Museum Artifacts Alexandria DL of Distributed Spatial Information Objects Earth Art Other Digital Archives

Museum Artifacts Alexandria DL of Distributed Spatial Information Objects Earth Art Other Digital Archives Zoological Habitat Study If it has a latitude and longitude then it can be in ADL Botanical Study Ocean Science Data Archeological Dig 12

Users and uses of geo-spatial digital libraries for learning • Instructors – Gather geography

Users and uses of geo-spatial digital libraries for learning • Instructors – Gather geography resources for teaching, using ADEPT and other sources – Present lectures to students using ADEPT – Design laboratory projects for students using ADEPT • Teaching assistants – Assist instructors in developing lectures and lab projects – Reinforce concepts in laboratory sections • Students – Attend lectures and labs presented with ADEPT – Conduct science experiments using ADEPT – Learn to “think like scientists” 13

Embedded Networked Sensing in support of Grades 7 -12 science education 14

Embedded Networked Sensing in support of Grades 7 -12 science education 14

Imagine this. . . 15

Imagine this. . . 15

Active, Networked-Sensor Investigations • Advantages – Sophisticated triggering: students direct sensors to collect data

Active, Networked-Sensor Investigations • Advantages – Sophisticated triggering: students direct sensors to collect data – Multi-variate data: students propose and test numerous hypotheses – Complex query capabilities: less time required to perform Local base authentic explorations Local sensors 16

Educational Vision Inquiry Modules Inquiry and Exploration Center for Embedded Networked Sensing Software and

Educational Vision Inquiry Modules Inquiry and Exploration Center for Embedded Networked Sensing Software and Systems Management Development 17

Educational Goals Inquiry and Exploration • To teach science as a way of knowing

Educational Goals Inquiry and Exploration • To teach science as a way of knowing • To learn science by doing • To deepen conceptual understanding • To promote original thinking, collaboration, and ownership of the learning process (AAAS, 1992; NRC, 1996; NCTM, 2000; ISTE, 1999) 18

Calibrated Peer Review • Provides strategic and epistemic guidance for students’ inquiry • Uses

Calibrated Peer Review • Provides strategic and epistemic guidance for students’ inquiry • Uses written work as public traces of students’ thinking • Promotes guided reflection upon science concepts and processes Supported by NSF Division of Undergraduate Education 95 -55605 19

Good Technology is Not Enough • College / university faculty – Scholarly practices well

Good Technology is Not Enough • College / university faculty – Scholarly practices well established, highly codified – Teaching practices individualized, idiosyncratic – Extrinsic rewards for scholarship are much greater than rewards for teaching • Academic libraries – Focus on collections, on access to information, – Little focus on delivery to classrooms, learning sites – Provide tools to search for information, not tools to use information 20

Implementing new information technologies • Usability – Useful for important tasks – Fits into

Implementing new information technologies • Usability – Useful for important tasks – Fits into work practices – Learning and implementation time / effort must be acceptable • Adoption – Must offer sufficient added value to be worth the effort to adopt – Assistance and services must be available to assist in design, development, and deployment 21

The New Academic Library • Resources / collections – For teaching and scholarship •

The New Academic Library • Resources / collections – For teaching and scholarship • Tools and services – Access, use, and create information resources – Persistent availability of resources • Infrastructure – To support scholarly and teaching applications • Integration / coupling – Tight coupling between library resources, services, user behavior, practices, information infrastructure – Digital libraries support life cycle of searching, using, creating, disposing of information 22

The New Academic Librarian • Library skills: select, collect, organize, preserve, conserve, provide access

The New Academic Librarian • Library skills: select, collect, organize, preserve, conserve, provide access to information in many media • Management skills: large, complex, evolving organizations • Technology skills: design, management, and policy • Scholarly knowledge: theory, method, practice of multiple disciplines • Educational skills: pedagogy, standards, discipline-specific technologies • Policy: intellectual property, infrastructure, technology • Vision: role of libraries in teaching, research, information infrastructure, national and global policy 23

Summary and Conclusions • Responding to Kemeny’s challenge to libraries: use computers to sustain

Summary and Conclusions • Responding to Kemeny’s challenge to libraries: use computers to sustain “the love of the material” – Libraries should be fully engaged in the scholarly and teaching missions of the college / university – Computers now can be used to make learning more like scholarship – Digital libraries can help to engage students in more active forms of learning and inquiry • Implementing digital libraries – Content, infrastructure, tools and services – Usability – Adoptability • New students, new libraries, new librarians • Integration of library, scholarly, teaching, and learning practices 24