Dual Credits An Update for Administrators Coordinators and

  • Slides: 58
Download presentation
Dual Credits: An Update for Administrators, Co-ordinators and Consultants OCTOBER 2018

Dual Credits: An Update for Administrators, Co-ordinators and Consultants OCTOBER 2018

Agenda § § § § Welcome and introductions What’s New in SCWI (After SWAC)

Agenda § § § § Welcome and introductions What’s New in SCWI (After SWAC) Student Selection Team-taught dual credits On-campus learning experiences Relationships SWAC programs Resources

Reporting and Data Sources 1. Regular EDCS reporting on Activities and Forums and Dual

Reporting and Data Sources 1. Regular EDCS reporting on Activities and Forums and Dual Credits. Includes participant data and information on expenditures. 2. Specific reporting on After ADC and After SWAC pilots which included additional details on student participation, and student pse transitions 3. SCWI Liaison Team monitoring reports 4. Anecdotal feedback (oral and written) shared by RPTs with SCWI 5. On. SIS data (mark distribution, demographic) 6. OCAS and OUAC data (application, registration) 7. External Research

How does SCWI use the data? § to determine areas of focus for the

How does SCWI use the data? § to determine areas of focus for the following Request for Proposals based on review of the previous year. § to conduct program-by-program annual review (by RPTs and by SCWI approvals team) § to identify programs where the expectation is that RPTs will identify strategies where results are below the provincial average § to improve program quality § to ensure program fidelity § to communicate to the funder regarding the success of the program and to secure future funding

Focus on Improvement How do you improve your program? How do you measure the

Focus on Improvement How do you improve your program? How do you measure the success of your program? How do you monitor the success?

Dual Credit Programs Focus for 2018 -19 § appropriate student selection § college course

Dual Credit Programs Focus for 2018 -19 § appropriate student selection § college course section and delivery models that best match the needs of the eligible students

Auditor General of Ontario, 2013 followup to the 2011 report “We noted situations where

Auditor General of Ontario, 2013 followup to the 2011 report “We noted situations where the work placements in the Cooperative Education program did not appear to complement the students’ curriculum requirements for in-class learning. Students earned credits in a wide range of placements, such as clothing stores, fastfood outlets, coffee shops and laboratories. ” http: //www. auditor. on. ca/en/content/annualreports/arreports/en 13/413 en 13. pdf, p. 377

Auditor General of Ontario, 2013 followup to the 2011 report Recommendation: § “better link

Auditor General of Ontario, 2013 followup to the 2011 report Recommendation: § “better link work placements in cooperative education with course expectations to ensure that the placements complement the in-class experience as required; ” http: //www. auditor. on. ca/en/content/annualreports/arreport s/en 13/413 en 13. pdf, p. 380

Auditor General of Ontario, 2013 followup to the 2011 report “The co-operative education program

Auditor General of Ontario, 2013 followup to the 2011 report “The co-operative education program allows students to earn secondary school credits while completing a work placement in the community. In spring 2012, ministry staff engaged the Ontario Cooperative Education Association executive and other regional co-operative education associations in discussions on practices related to personalized placement learning plans and improving linkages between students’ co-operative education experience and in-class credits. In the summer of 2012 the Ministry contracted four school board cooperative education co-ordinators to document best practices. In the spring of 2013 the Ministry released a new resource for co-operative education teachers and school and board administrators highlighting best practices, including matching placements to curriculum expectations. ” http: //www. auditor. on. ca/en/content/annualreports/arreports/en 13/413 en 13. pdf, p. 381

Need to protect the integrity of the program § efficiency and accountability § are

Need to protect the integrity of the program § efficiency and accountability § are we serving the students the program is designed to serve?

Student Selection for Primary Target Group Dual Credit Programs The concern: § Do we

Student Selection for Primary Target Group Dual Credit Programs The concern: § Do we have the right students in this targeted initiative? Where we heard about the problem: § After SWAC reports from college advisors § EDCS data

Student Selection for Primary Target Group Dual Credit Programs Plan for improvement § PD

Student Selection for Primary Target Group Dual Credit Programs Plan for improvement § PD on student selection and the goals of the initiative § clarification in the annual SCWI Request for Proposals § work with RPTs and boards where the issue is most pronounced

Who is eligible to participate? + Underachieving + Potential to Succeed Disengaged Primary Target

Who is eligible to participate? + Underachieving + Potential to Succeed Disengaged Primary Target Group SCWI/IJECT 13

Evidence that a student is disengaged § has had numerous absences; § has previously

Evidence that a student is disengaged § has had numerous absences; § has previously dropped out or is at risk of dropping out; § is out of school but is reluctant to return to secondary school for nonacademic reasons; § displays a lack of involvement or engagement in school or community activities; § sees little connection between secondary school and his or her preferred future; § lacks confidence in his or her ability to succeed; § is unsure of his or her pathway beyond secondary school; (Dual Credit Programs, Policy and Program § is in need of career clarification. Requirements, 2013, p. 25) SCWI/IJECT 14

Evidence that a student is underachieving § has fewer credits than average for his

Evidence that a student is underachieving § has fewer credits than average for his or her grade and is therefore not on track to graduate on time; § is older than other students in his or her grade; § was making progress earlier, but progress has slowed; § is demonstrating a decline in achievement or marks over time. (Dual Credit Programs, Policy and Program Requirements, 2013, p. 25) SCWI/IJECT 15

Evidence that a student has the potential to succeed § has completed most or

Evidence that a student has the potential to succeed § has completed most or all compulsory credits; § can potentially graduate within one year (e. g. , already has 22 or more credits) if provided with support; § demonstrates that issues that were previously preventing success have been or are being addressed; § demonstrates interest in and commitment to the dual credit program; (Dual Credit Programs, Policy and Program Requirements, 2013, p. 25 -26) SCWI/IJECT 16

Evidence that a student has the potential to succeed is motivated to improve skills

Evidence that a student has the potential to succeed is motivated to improve skills and work habits; demonstrates evidence of independent learning skills; demonstrates an appropriate maturity level; if he or she previously left school and has since returned, demonstrates progress in courses in the first semester, which will enable him or her to start a dual credit program in the second semester; § demonstrates progress, maturity, motivation, or skills in activities outside the school setting. § § (Dual Credit Programs, Policy and Program Requirements, 2013, p. 26) SCWI/IJECT 17

For success in dual credit college courses The student should: § have had some

For success in dual credit college courses The student should: § have had some success in college preparation courses. (Dual Credit Programs, Policy and Program Requirements, 2013, p. 26) SCWI/IJECT 18

Student Selection for Primary Target Group Dual Credit Programs • Who can determine that

Student Selection for Primary Target Group Dual Credit Programs • Who can determine that the students are ready for the program? • “ready to step up for this opportunity” • 12/12+ Re-engagement initiative • In 2017 -18, 1, 675 adolescent students returned to school to participate (preliminary EDCS data) SCWI/IJECT 19

How are you ensuring the students for whom the program was designed (co-op or

How are you ensuring the students for whom the program was designed (co-op or dual credits) are the students selected for the program?

SCWI Goals Increase Completion of OSSDs Seamless Transition to Postsecondary SCWI / IJECT 21

SCWI Goals Increase Completion of OSSDs Seamless Transition to Postsecondary SCWI / IJECT 21

SCWI Goals Increase Completion of OSSDs Seamless Transition to Postsecondary SCWI / IJECT 22

SCWI Goals Increase Completion of OSSDs Seamless Transition to Postsecondary SCWI / IJECT 22

Student Selection § EDCS data shows that there are lots of students by age

Student Selection § EDCS data shows that there are lots of students by age not eligible to graduate; therefore, not eligible to participate § “has completed most or all compulsory credits; ” § “can potentially graduate within one year (e. g. , already has 22 or more credits) if provided with support; ” (p. 25) § On. SIS data shows there are students who already have a diploma prior to entry in dual credits § “Dual credit programs are intended to assist secondary school students in completing their OSSD” (p. 5) 23

Student Selection: OSSD Completion RPT Province Number Percentage Students who earned their OSSD, 2015

Student Selection: OSSD Completion RPT Province Number Percentage Students who earned their OSSD, 2015 -16 Students who earned their OSSD, 2016 -17 66 29% 8, 906 56% 92 39% 8, 303 54% Spring 2018 SCWI RPT-Specific SMART Goal Report 24

SCWI Goals Increase Completion of OSSDs Seamless Transition to Postsecondary SCWI / IJECT 25

SCWI Goals Increase Completion of OSSDs Seamless Transition to Postsecondary SCWI / IJECT 25

Student Selection: PSE Transitions The concern: § Do we have the right students in

Student Selection: PSE Transitions The concern: § Do we have the right students in this targeted initiative – ones likely to transition to pse? Where we heard about the problem: § OCAS/On. SIS data § After SWAC reports from college advisors § EDCS data

PSE Direct Registration Rates Direct Registration Rate for 2009 -10 Cohort Dual Credit College

PSE Direct Registration Rates Direct Registration Rate for 2009 -10 Cohort Dual Credit College 31% 20% 7% 35% University Non-Dual Credit Note: Of the full 2009 -10 Grade 9 Cohort, 33022 (20%) students registered directly to college. On. SIS, OCAS, OUAC data. SCWI / IJECT 27

How many students did not directly register in PSE? 2009 -10 Cohort Dual Credit

How many students did not directly register in PSE? 2009 -10 Cohort Dual Credit Non-Dual Credit Did not register in college or university in the subsequent year after their 5 th year in secondary school 62% 45% On. SIS, OCAS, OUAC data. Board-specific data is available from your board’s MISA lead. SCWI / IJECT 28

Province After 1 Year* After 2 Years** After 3 Years*** Total Number of Dual

Province After 1 Year* After 2 Years** After 3 Years*** Total Number of Dual Credit Students 2012 -13 2013 -14 2014 -15 Dual Credit Students 2, 664 2, 721 3, 015 (20%) (21%) 4, 461 5, 013 n/a (34%) (37%) 5, 727 n/a (43%) 13, 186 13, 707 14, 453 Spring 2018 SCWI RPT-Specific SMART Goal Report, OCAS data 29

Main Components of the After SWAC Pilot Programs • College advisors • Three one-hour

Main Components of the After SWAC Pilot Programs • College advisors • Three one-hour group conversations led by a college advisor • Up to four hours per student of individual discussion and follow up with advisor • PD for college advisors • Report back on participants and results • OCAS or OUAC application funded through the pilot SCWI/IJECT 30

Student Selection: PSE Transitions After SWAC feedback highlighted that there were SWAC students not

Student Selection: PSE Transitions After SWAC feedback highlighted that there were SWAC students not interested in: • attending the sessions • discussing post-secondary plans • applying for college and exploring financing PSE 31

Student Selection: PSE Transitions Plan for improvement § PD on student selection and both

Student Selection: PSE Transitions Plan for improvement § PD on student selection and both goals of the initiative § clarification in the annual SCWI Request for Proposals § work with RPTs and boards where the issue is most pronounced § introduction and monitoring of After SWAC pilot activities § Continue to work with EDU, TCU, OCAS and OUAC to research dual credit students transitions to PSE

Team-taught dual credits – new report The concern: § students not getting on a

Team-taught dual credits – new report The concern: § students not getting on a college campus § not a real college experience § not increasing transition to postsecondary Where we heard about the problem: § Anecdotal feedback from colleges § EDCS financial data

Team-taught dual credits § team-taught dual credits continue to be approved § not our

Team-taught dual credits § team-taught dual credits continue to be approved § not our preferred approach, but where distance is an issue it can be a viable alternative

Conference Board of Canada Report: Making the Connection “One way to improve the connectivity

Conference Board of Canada Report: Making the Connection “One way to improve the connectivity of the K– 12 and PSE sectors is to encourage collegial relationships and collaboration between educators in the two sectors. ” (Martin, Elizabeth, Making the Connection: Growing collegiality and Collaboration Between K-12 and PSE Educators, Ottawa: the Conference Board of Canada, 2018. p. 43)

Conference Board of Canada Report: Making the Connection “Fostering collegiality between K– 12 and

Conference Board of Canada Report: Making the Connection “Fostering collegiality between K– 12 and PSE educators offers benefits to educational institutions, educators, and students. Connected educators share insights into different approaches to teaching and assessment, introduce new approaches into their classrooms, and help prepare students for success in higher education. ” (Martin, Elizabeth, Making the Connection: Growing collegiality and Collaboration Between K-12 and PSE Educators, Ottawa: the Conference Board of Canada, 2018. p. 43)

Conference Board of Canada Report: Making the Connection “At first he was wary of

Conference Board of Canada Report: Making the Connection “At first he was wary of taking on a team-taught course. Skeptical of the state of teaching and learning in contemporary high schools, he explained, “We [college instructors] like to blame the high schools for not preparing students, ” but being on the inside of a high school classroom gave him a new understanding of where students are coming from when they get to college. ” (Martin, Elizabeth, Making the Connection: Growing collegiality and Collaboration Between K-12 and PSE Educators, Ottawa: the Conference Board of Canada, 2018. p. 43)

Conference Board of Canada Report: Making the Connection “Likewise, Yvonne Mc. Nulty, an educator

Conference Board of Canada Report: Making the Connection “Likewise, Yvonne Mc. Nulty, an educator from the Durham District School Board who team-taught the secondary English curriculum alongside Mr. Rhodes, says the experience gave her exposure to college programs, courses, and potential career pathways for students. Now, she said, she can speak more confidently about college options and expectations to her students. ” (Martin, Elizabeth, Making the Connection: Growing collegiality and Collaboration Between K-12 and PSE Educators, Ottawa: the Conference Board of Canada, 2018. p. 43)

Conference Board of Canada Report: Making the Connection “… team teaching has benefits for

Conference Board of Canada Report: Making the Connection “… team teaching has benefits for students. Students in the Mc. Nulty/Rhodes team-taught course said that memorable aspects included: § the opportunity to tour the Durham College campus, § easier access to an instructor (there are two educators in the room on team-taught days), and § learning how to use the college’s learning management system and online discussion boards. § Students also got a preview of what it is like to be a college student by being held to the same expectations as Mr. Rhodes’ college students. ” (Martin, Elizabeth, Making the Connection: Growing collegiality and Collaboration Between K-12 and PSE Educators, Ottawa: the Conference Board of Canada, 2018. p. 45)

Team-taught dual credits Plan for improvement § clarification in the annual SCWI Request for

Team-taught dual credits Plan for improvement § clarification in the annual SCWI Request for Proposals on the importance of on-campus learning experiences § highlight the strengths of these programs, including the value of having two instructors in the classroom at the same time § encourage RPTs with team-taught dual credit programs to learn from the findings of the external research § gather and share successful practices around team-taught dual credits

Student Selection: OYAP and SHSM Programs The concern: § OYAP students in Level 1

Student Selection: OYAP and SHSM Programs The concern: § OYAP students in Level 1 programs for PTG students (ones with SCWI Seat Purchase) § SHSM programs with no (or few) SHSM students; lots of PTG students Where we heard about the problem: § EDCS student data § EDCS financial data

Student Selection: OYAP and SHSM Programs Plan for improvement § clarification included in Request

Student Selection: OYAP and SHSM Programs Plan for improvement § clarification included in Request for Proposals § PD on student selection § Review as part of SMART goal visits § work with RPTs and boards where the issue is most pronounced

School Within a College Programs The concern: § ages of students in SWAC §

School Within a College Programs The concern: § ages of students in SWAC § credits attempted while in SWAC § credit accumulation § “Some students had workplace level courses from high school which resulted in them not qualifying for the programs they were interested in. ” § Program not being used as a last attempt to help students graduate and transition to PSE

SWAC Programs Where we heard about the problem: § review of After SWAC reports

SWAC Programs Where we heard about the problem: § review of After SWAC reports from college advisors § review of EDCS and On. SIS data

SWAC Programs: Clarification § must be delivered on an existing college campus, where other

SWAC Programs: Clarification § must be delivered on an existing college campus, where other regular college students are in attendance and services provided § programs intended for students in their final semester of secondary school § students will have graduated at the end of the SWAC program § this is a full-time program on campus § students must attempt at least three credits in a semester, including at least one Ontario curriculum credits and at least one dual credit(s) in each semester

SWAC Programs Plan for improvement § be more specific around expectations regarding SWAC programs

SWAC Programs Plan for improvement § be more specific around expectations regarding SWAC programs in the RFP § provide PD on SWAC programs § monitor data and put programs “on notice” where there is evidence that students are not eligible

Building Relationships Key The concern: § After SWAC and After ADC activity pilots may

Building Relationships Key The concern: § After SWAC and After ADC activity pilots may be seen as expensive § Need to build a case for the pilots Where we heard about the problem:

Building Relationships Key “We believe that building developmental relationships with young people is the

Building Relationships Key “We believe that building developmental relationships with young people is the single most influential thing adults can do to help them succeed. ” Relationships First: Creating Connections that Help Young People Thrive, Search Institute, 2017 (https: //www. search-institute. org/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/2017 -Relationships-Firstfinal. pdf)

After SWAC and After ADC § Includes four components: § group conversations per class

After SWAC and After ADC § Includes four components: § group conversations per class with a college advisor and dual credit teacher, if appropriate § one-on-one follow-up conversations with the college advisor § PD and reporting for the college advisor and dual credit teacher § Funded OCAS/OUAC applications for ADC/SWAC students SCWI / IJECT 49

After SWAC – Year 1 Pilots Sem 1 Sem 2 and Summer Total #

After SWAC – Year 1 Pilots Sem 1 Sem 2 and Summer Total # of students on track to graduate at the end of the semester 322 906 1228 # of students who applied to college 425 430 855 # of students who received an offer to college 261 323 584 # of students who applied to OSAP 102 256 358 -- 66 65 # of students considering an Apprenticeships As reported by RPTs – preliminary 2017 -18 data

After SWAC – Year 1 Pilots 70% 68% 42% • % of SWAC students

After SWAC – Year 1 Pilots 70% 68% 42% • % of SWAC students who applied to college of those SWAC students on track to graduate • % of students who applied to college who received an offer of admission • % of students who applied to college also applied for OSAP As reported by RPTs – preliminary 2017 -18 data

After SWAC - Barriers Pilots identified a wide range of barriers faced by students

After SWAC - Barriers Pilots identified a wide range of barriers faced by students Multiple responses in order of frequency: • Financial (housing, seat deposit) • OSAP (application, the need for parent’s tax records, proof of “independent status”) • Lack of self-confidence (including decision-making skills) • Lack of pre-requisites to get into programs of interest (including ENG 4 C) • Mental health, anxiety As reported by RPTs through After SWAC supplementary reporting, March 2018 52

After SWAC – Notes and Observations We’re on the right track… • Being able

After SWAC – Notes and Observations We’re on the right track… • Being able to apply without the worry of the [$95] application fee more than tripled the number of SWAC students who normally apply during the semester. Students were relieved and excited to make their applications. This has been an extremely positive and motiving experience for all involved. • Many students in the SWAC program don’t have the support at home to help them navigate the PSE system which puts them at a disadvantage in planning their Postsecondary options. After SWAC advising is helping to address this barrier. As reported by RPTs through After SWAC supplementary reporting, March 2018 53

After SWAC – Notes and Observations We’re on the right track… • Providing these

After SWAC – Notes and Observations We’re on the right track… • Providing these students with the ability to attain confidence by creating relationships and building rapport was necessary for this position. This assisted in the desire to attend post secondary As reported by RPTs through After SWAC supplementary reporting, March 2018 54

Building Relationships Key Plan for improvement § share the report § include findings in

Building Relationships Key Plan for improvement § share the report § include findings in PD § remind decision-makers of the value of additional caring adults in the lives of students in the program

Do we have the right students in our programs? If not, how do we

Do we have the right students in our programs? If not, how do we change this? 56

Questions 57

Questions 57

Contact Us Phil Hedges (Phil. Hedges@kwic. com) Sonja Vandermeer (Svandermeer@ontariodirectors. ca ) Janine Griffore

Contact Us Phil Hedges (Phil. [email protected] com) Sonja Vandermeer ([email protected] ca ) Janine Griffore (janine. [email protected] com ) SCWI / IJECT 58