Developing an Argument in Writing Constructing an Argument

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Developing an Argument in Writing: Constructing an Argument and Incorporating Evidence and Theory This

Developing an Argument in Writing: Constructing an Argument and Incorporating Evidence and Theory This workshop will: − Revist what an argument is − Suggest ‘types’ of argument that an assignment can be built around − Offer strategies to apply evidence and theory into your written work Louise Livesey Academic Skills Adviser

Today’s Plan 1. Types of arguments to construct 2. Using evidence to support your

Today’s Plan 1. Types of arguments to construct 2. Using evidence to support your argument 3. Using theory in your writing

1. Types of argument to construct Analysis Critical Thinking • Evidencing is more than

1. Types of argument to construct Analysis Critical Thinking • Evidencing is more than one source • Check your reading list • Keep a record Think, read, write

1. Types of argument to construct • Agreeing and presenting reliable evidence to support

1. Types of argument to construct • Agreeing and presenting reliable evidence to support the position taken. • Rejecting but again using reliable evidence to do this. (A counter-argument with each individual claim in the argument in question is ‘countered’ by another claim). • Conceding that an existing argument/point of view has merits, but needs to be qualified in certain respects, and stating what these are. • Proposing a new argument/point of view, or reformulating an existing one, so that the new version makes a better explanation for the situation under discussion. • Reconciling by bringing a new perspective to bear on the topic. • Connecting or synthesizing different ideas, so new approaches and arguments/points of view can be brought to bear on the subject.

1. Types of argument to construct TALKING POINT Graphic representation of argument Waitrose better

1. Types of argument to construct TALKING POINT Graphic representation of argument Waitrose better Agree Convenience Shorter queues Range Quality Chocolate brands Fresher bread

1. Types of argument to construct Activity 1: Workshops v Instant Action

1. Types of argument to construct Activity 1: Workshops v Instant Action

2. Using evidence to support your argument Use examples… • Which highlight the most

2. Using evidence to support your argument Use examples… • Which highlight the most significant or far-reaching implications • To illustrate different aspects of your argument • From a range of sources, e. g. journal articles, books, and reports • To support general arguments. • Use empirical evidence, i. e. evidence collected via systematic and rigorous observation • Use maps, diagrams and numerical data (in appropriate assessments, i. e. not essays but reports and dissertations)

3. Using theory in your writing DO NOT PANIC

3. Using theory in your writing DO NOT PANIC

4. Using theory in your writing • Competing theories are not equal – different

4. Using theory in your writing • Competing theories are not equal – different theories appeal to different kinds of evidence, so different theories are ‘useful’ in different contexts. • Do not lump together good bits of different theories into one ‘super theory’ as they will contradict each other. Stand outside to see a theory’s strengths and weaknesses

4. Using theory in your writing Clear slide for me

4. Using theory in your writing Clear slide for me

Summary Undertake critical analysis before you start writing Are clear about your position on

Summary Undertake critical analysis before you start writing Are clear about your position on the issue (if asked to choose a stance) Take multiple perspectives – THE BEST ANSWERS DO THIS: IT IS A MARK WINNER Are clear about your conclusion (if asked to be definite) Use appropriate empirical or theoretical evidence to support your points/beliefs ‘Stand outside’ a theory to see its strengths and weaknesses

Analyse your own work – be your own critic

Analyse your own work – be your own critic

References Clip art – spectacles/question Cottrell, S. (2013) The Study Skills Handbook. 4 th

References Clip art – spectacles/question Cottrell, S. (2013) The Study Skills Handbook. 4 th Ed. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. dogfaceboy (2007) Slick flame stitch. [online] Available at: http: //www. flickr. com/photos/dogfaceboy/377499363/ [Accessed 21. 7. 2014] Redman, P. (2001) Good Essay Writing. 2 nd Ed. London: Sage Publications Ltd. The Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. (2014) Available at: http: //en. wikipedia. org/wiki/Pierre_Bourdieu#Bourdieu. 27 s_theory_of_class_distincti on [Accessed 21. 7. 2014]

References University of Surrey. (2014) Writing Skills. Guildford: University of Surrey. [online] Available at:

References University of Surrey. (2014) Writing Skills. Guildford: University of Surrey. [online] Available at: http: //libweb. surrey. ac. uk/library/skills/writing%20 Skills%20 Leicester/page_01. htm [Accessed 6. 3. 2014] Van den Brink-Budgen, R. (2010) Critical Thinking for Students. 4 th Ed. Oxford: How To Books Ltd.

Academic Skills Advice Service • Where are we? Chesham Building B 0. 23 •

Academic Skills Advice Service • Where are we? Chesham Building B 0. 23 • What do we do? Support undergraduate students with their academic skills by running clinics and workshops, having bookable appointment slots, and enabling students to drop-in for Instant Action. • Who are we? Michael and Helen specialise in Maths Support; Lucy and Russell advise students on study skills; and I (Louise) deliver the workshops • When can you come for help? Everyday both face to face and on-line • How do I get in touch? Email: [email protected] ac. uk or website www. brad. ac. uk/academicskills

Any questions?

Any questions?