D O W N T O Z E

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D O W N T O Z E R O Down To Zero Eliminate

D O W N T O Z E R O Down To Zero Eliminate Falls/Save Lives State Building & Construction Trades Council of California, AFL-CIO Funded by Federal OSHA (2013) PPT Section 2 of 8 This material was produced under grant number SH-23588 -12 -60 -F-6 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U. S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U. S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U. S. Government.

D O W N T O Z E R O Background - Falls in

D O W N T O Z E R O Background - Falls in Construction 2

D O W N T O Z E R O Why This Training? Show

D O W N T O Z E R O Why This Training? Show Digital Story: Solar Panel Installer Falls Off Roof Discuss the following questions: – What caused Hans to fall off the roof? – Have you or someone you know ever faced a similar fall hazard? Please tell us about it. – What are all of the different fall protection systems that could have been used at Hans’ jobsite? – What needs to be done to identify potential fall hazards prior to starting a job?

D O W N T O Z E R O U. S. Construction Industry

D O W N T O Z E R O U. S. Construction Industry - 2011 • Falls are the leading cause of death in construction • 17. 5 % of all workplace fatalities are in construction • Construction workers are: – 6% of the workforce nationwide, and – 17. 5% of the workplace deaths

D O W N T O Z E R O Deaths From Falls In

D O W N T O Z E R O Deaths From Falls In Construction, by Worksite Size, 2008 -2010 (Nationwide) Total = 521 deaths 12. 5%; 13% 8. 1%; 8% 15. 9%; 16% 8. 8%; 9% Source: CPWR 1 -10 employees 11 -19 employees 54. 7%; 55% 20 -49 employees 50 -99 employees 100+ employees

D O W N T O Z E R O Causes of Construction Falls

D O W N T O Z E R O Causes of Construction Falls in California (2011) Construction Industry Falls, 2011 Total = 23 Other (26%) From roof (30%) From scaffolding (13%) From skylights (13%) From ladders (13%) Data for 2011 is preliminary

D O W N T O Z E R O Rate Of Deaths From

D O W N T O Z E R O Rate Of Deaths From Falls, Selected Construction Trades, 2008 -2010 Deaths per 100, 000 full-time workers Power-line installer Roofer Ironworker Sheet metal Laborer Welder Brickmason Painter Helper Foreman Carpenter Electrician Drywall Heat A/C mech Plumber Construction manager All construction Source: CPWR 6. 5 5. 7 5. 3 5. 1 4. 7 4. 0 3. 6 2. 5 2. 3 2. 1 1. 4 1. 1 3. 2 23. 8 28. 5

D O W N T O Z E R O Rate Of Fatal Falls

D O W N T O Z E R O Rate Of Fatal Falls Among Hispanic Foreign-born, Native, and White, Non-Hispanic Construction Workers, 2001 -2008 FTE = Full-time equivalent, defined as 2, 000 hours worked per year. Source: CPWR, Bureau of Labor Statistics: Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries, Current Population Survey.

D O W N T O Z E R O Fatalities From Falls Among

D O W N T O Z E R O Fatalities From Falls Among Hispanic Construction Workers, 2003 -2008 Source: CPWR, Bureau of Labor Statistics: Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries.

D O W N T O Z E R O Top Ten OSHA Citations

D O W N T O Z E R O Top Ten OSHA Citations (2011) • • • Scaffolding, construction Fall protection, construction Hazard communication standard, general industry Respiratory protection, general industry Control of hazardous energy (lockout/tagout), general industry Electrical, wiring methods, components and equipment, general industry Powered industrial trucks, general industry Ladders, construction Electrical systems design, general requirements/industry Machine guarding (machines, general industry)

D O W N T O Z E R O What Are The Most

D O W N T O Z E R O What Are The Most Common Causes of Falls? Photo: e. LCOSH Photo: Robert Carr Photo: NAHB

D O W N T O Z E R O Can You Catch Yourself

D O W N T O Z E R O Can You Catch Yourself If You Fall? • No! • The average person’s reaction time is half a second. In that time you fall 4 feet • Gravity pulls you down and your speed quickly increases • A person who weighs 200 pounds and falls 6 feet will hit the ground with almost 10, 000 pounds of force > Do the card activity

D O W N T O Z E R O What Should An Employer

D O W N T O Z E R O What Should An Employer Do Before Work Begins? – Identify fall hazards – Identify methods, systems, and procedures to eliminate or control fall hazards – Designate competent and qualified persons

D O W N T O Z E R O What Is A “Competent”

D O W N T O Z E R O What Is A “Competent” Person? • Identifies existing and predictable hazards • Has authority to eliminate fall hazards • Has authority to stop work if unsafe conditions exist • Has authority to take prompt corrective action to eliminate hazards

D O W N T O Z E R O What Is A “Qualified”

D O W N T O Z E R O What Is A “Qualified” Person? • A person designated by the employer; and by reason of training, experience, or instruction, has demonstrated the ability to perform safely all assigned duties

D O W N T O Z E R O What’s Wrong In This

D O W N T O Z E R O What’s Wrong In This Picture? Photo: OSHA Training Institute, Southwest Education Center

D O W N T O Z E R O When Is Fall Protection

D O W N T O Z E R O When Is Fall Protection Required? • Above 30’: Iron Workers connecting steel • Above 20’: Roofers applying roofing material (only applies in California) • Above 15’: Iron Workers bolting steel (bolt-up) • Above 6’ (7 -1/2’ in CA): Anyone working on unprotected sides and edges • Above 6’: Rod Busters working with rebar • Above 4’: Electrical & Telecom workers climbing Source: Cal/OSHA poles & towers

D O W N T O Z E R O Reinforcing Steel (Rodbusting) Photo:

D O W N T O Z E R O Reinforcing Steel (Rodbusting) Photo: Cal/OSHA

D O W N T O Z E R O Cal/OSHA’s Steel Erection Standard

D O W N T O Z E R O Cal/OSHA’s Steel Erection Standard Connectors must use fall protection when working two stories or 30 feet above a lower level Photo: e. LCOSH

D O W N T O Z E R O Change In The Federal

D O W N T O Z E R O Change In The Federal Residential Fall Protection Policy The new federal directive 1926. 501(b)(13) states: – Workers “engaged in residential construction activities 6 feet (1. 8 m) or more above lower levels shall be protected by guardrail systems, safety net system, or personal fall arrest system” – or, by alternative fall protection measures allowed under 1926. 501(b) for particular types of work