CREDIBLE SOURCES Types of Sources Books and Textbooks

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CREDIBLE SOURCES

CREDIBLE SOURCES

Types of Sources • Books and Textbooks • Newspapers • Academic and Trade Journals

Types of Sources • Books and Textbooks • Newspapers • Academic and Trade Journals • Websites

How do you know which websites to trust? DOMAIN MEANING CAN I TRUST IT?

How do you know which websites to trust? DOMAIN MEANING CAN I TRUST IT? . gov Government Websites Government websites tend to be factual and research based, so many people trust them. They are produced and funded by the federal government. . edu Educational Websites For the most part, educational websites are also factual and credible. Some studentcreated websites, however, also end in. edu . organizations Organizational websites, such as non-profits like the American Red Cross, generally include factual information that isn’t biased. However, these websites also have a specific purpose they hope to achieve, and you may want to consider whether the website is overemphasizing or ignoring certain information or points of view.

How do you know which websites to trust? DOMAIN MEANING CAN I TRUST IT?

How do you know which websites to trust? DOMAIN MEANING CAN I TRUST IT? . com Commercial websites . net Networking websites Commercial websites are for business use; this means that someone is trying to make some money. This may or may not alter the perspective, types of information, and credibility of what is presented on a. com website. Network websites are a grab-bag of any kind of website. Be very careful with these websites, and consider the purpose, goal, and authors when deciding whether or not to use the information.

How do you know which websites to trust? Things to Consider: • Always consider

How do you know which websites to trust? Things to Consider: • Always consider who or what created the website and the purpose for the website. • Consider whether the information is up-to-date. • Verify information by locating it on several different websites. Do they agree?

STRATEGY #1

STRATEGY #1

Strategy #1: IS IT CRAP?

Strategy #1: IS IT CRAP?

Is it CRAP? • Currency • How recent is the information? • How recently

Is it CRAP? • Currency • How recent is the information? • How recently has the website been updated? • Is it current enough for your topic? • Reliability • What kind of information is included in the resource? • Is content of the resource primarily opinion? Is it balanced? • Does the creator provide references or sources for data or quotations?

Is it CRAP? • Authority • Who is the creator or author? • What

Is it CRAP? • Authority • Who is the creator or author? • What are the credentials? • Who is the publisher or sponsor? • Are they reputable? • What is the publisher’s interest (if any) in this information? • Are there advertisements on the website? • Purpose/Point of View • Is this fact or opinion? • Is the creator/author trying to sell you something? • Is it biased?

Credibility of Source • Publication process • Print Sources: Extensive publication process that includes

Credibility of Source • Publication process • Print Sources: Extensive publication process that includes editing and article review that has factcheckers, multiple reviewers, and editors to ensure quality of publication. • Internet Sources: Anyone with a computer and access to the Internet can publish a Web site. Most Web documents do not have editors, fact-checkers, or other types of reviewers. • TIP: Make sure the internet source is an online version of a newspaper, book, etc. Top Writing Academy™ © 2015

Credibility of Source • Authorship and affiliations • Print Sources: Print sources clearly indicate

Credibility of Source • Authorship and affiliations • Print Sources: Print sources clearly indicate who the author is, what organization(s) he or she is affiliated with, and when his or her work was published. • Internet Sources: Authorship and affiliations are difficult to determine on the Internet. Some sites may have author and sponsorship listed, but many do not. • TIP: Make sure the internet source has a credible affiliation – check that it is NOT a blog, high school newspaper, etc. Top Writing Academy™ © 2015

Credibility of Source • Author qualifications • Print Sources: Only qualified authors are likely

Credibility of Source • Author qualifications • Print Sources: Only qualified authors are likely to have their manuscripts accepted for publication. • Internet Sources: Even if the author and purpose of a website can be determined, the qualifications of the author are not always given. • TIP: Make sure the author always has a title by their name that tells you what their position is in the company. This builds their credibility and means you can trust them. Top Writing Academy™ © 2015

Credibility of Source • Publication information • Print Sources: Publication information such as date

Credibility of Source • Publication information • Print Sources: Publication information such as date of publication, publisher, author, and editor are always clearly listed in print publications. • Internet Sources: Dates of publication and timeliness of information are questionable on the Internet. Dates listed on Web sites could be the date posted, date updated, or a date may not be listed at all. • TIP: Make sure the date of the publication are listed. If there is no date, do not trust the information. Top Writing Academy™ © 2015

Credibility of Source • How does grammar and style affect credibility? • Print Sources:

Credibility of Source • How does grammar and style affect credibility? • Print Sources: Printed sources undergo an extensive process of editing, revising, and fact-checking. This ensures that information you find in a printed source is trustworthy. • Internet Sources: Anyone can post to the internet. However, a red flag that would indicate the source is NOT trustworthy is the grammar and style of the piece. If the grammar and style of the piece is choppy or has multiple errors – this lessens the author’s credibility. • TIP: Make sure the grammar and style of the piece are correct. Mistakes = not trustworthy. Top Writing Academy™ © 2015

STRATEGY #2

STRATEGY #2

STRATEGY #2: DONUTS

STRATEGY #2: DONUTS

IS MY SOURCE CREDIBLE? § source = place I got info to quote/paraphrase/summarize §credible

IS MY SOURCE CREDIBLE? § source = place I got info to quote/paraphrase/summarize §credible = trusted or good enough to use It IS a credible source if it is a… § hard copy of a book, magazine, newspaper. . . etc. § online version of a book, magazine, newspaper § Website ending with. edu or. gov

OTHERWISE… YOU’LL HAVE TO USE DONUTS

OTHERWISE… YOU’LL HAVE TO USE DONUTS

DONUTS D Date when published O Organization (or author provided) N NOT a blog

DONUTS D Date when published O Organization (or author provided) N NOT a blog or personal site

DONUTS U Up-to-date information T Title for article is provided S Sensical; i. e.

DONUTS U Up-to-date information T Title for article is provided S Sensical; i. e. it makes sense!