CPM vs Afterschool CVUSD Background CPM Overview Preparing

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CPM vs. Afterschool • • CVUSD Background CPM Overview Preparing for CPM Three CPM

CPM vs. Afterschool • • CVUSD Background CPM Overview Preparing for CPM Three CPM Instruments – Ongoing Program Self-Evaluation Tool (OPSET) – BASP CPM Instrument – CAIS Reporting System • • Detail of BASPA Instrument Building your Box Resources Questions

CPM Corner Staff • • After School Regional Lead CPM team members CDE Consultants

CPM Corner Staff • • After School Regional Lead CPM team members CDE Consultants John Duran – CVUSD Director, Afterschool – 760 -399 -5137 x 475 – E: [email protected] us Alfonso Alejandre - E: simple. [email protected] com - fonzieafterschool. wordpress. com

Training for the battle! • The CPM Office coordinates and schedules date of CPM

Training for the battle! • The CPM Office coordinates and schedules date of CPM visit each ELA. - Electronic CAIS review - Entrance meeting (at DO) - School site visit(s) - Exit meeting (at DO) • The CPM visit is combination of: – Document review (onsite & CAIS online) – Interviews – Observations • The most compliant CPMs are well organized and planned several months before the CPM scheduled review. • Implementing a file folder system of documentation is highly recommended • Focus on current year as much as possible

CPM Instruments BASP – Identifies review items – CPM review based on this document

CPM Instruments BASP – Identifies review items – CPM review based on this document OPSET (Ongoing Program Self- Evaluation Tool) – Same Items as BASP instrument, with additional resources for LEA.

Program Dimensions All CPM Instruments – including BASPorganize the legal requirements into seven interrelated

Program Dimensions All CPM Instruments – including BASPorganize the legal requirements into seven interrelated dimensions: I. Involvement II. Governance and Administration III. Funding IV. Standards, Assessment and Accountability V. Staffing and Professional Development VI. Opportunity and Equal Educational Access VII. Teaching and Learning

Supporting Items Recommendations Instrument Resources BASP OPSET Dimension Evidence Core Items

Supporting Items Recommendations Instrument Resources BASP OPSET Dimension Evidence Core Items

Core Items Supporting Items Evidence Findings Conclusion BASP Instrument Dimension

Core Items Supporting Items Evidence Findings Conclusion BASP Instrument Dimension

BASP Program Instrument (Required by State or Federal Law)

BASP Program Instrument (Required by State or Federal Law)

Dimension I - Involvement

Dimension I - Involvement

Item 1: Community Collaboration (ASES, 21 st CCLC, ASSETs) • Collaborates with community on:

Item 1: Community Collaboration (ASES, 21 st CCLC, ASSETs) • Collaborates with community on: 1. Initial program development 2. Ongoing program implementation 3. Offsite programs aligning to regular-day program. Lack of collaboration has been the number #3 finding to date!

Item 2: Private School Communication (21 st CCLC, ASSETs) • Communicated with local private

Item 2: Private School Communication (21 st CCLC, ASSETs) • Communicated with local private schools on afterschool services 1. Relate what services you offer 2. Determine collaboration possibilities

Dimension II – Governance & Administration

Dimension II – Governance & Administration

Item 3: Grade Level of Students Served (ASES, 21 st CCLC, ASSETs) 1. ASES

Item 3: Grade Level of Students Served (ASES, 21 st CCLC, ASSETs) 1. ASES serves students K-9, inclusive. 2. 21 st CCLC serves elem and middle students 3. ASSETs programs serve high school students, grades 9 -12, inclusive. If program in only serving selected students or grade levels, program must have a policy stipulating why targeted and must include input from collaborative

Item 4: Program Days & Hours (ASES, 21 st CCLC, ASSETs) 1. 2. 3.

Item 4: Program Days & Hours (ASES, 21 st CCLC, ASSETs) 1. 2. 3. After School Programs: -Begin immediately upon the conclusion of the regular school day -Operate a minimum of 15 hours per week and at least until 6: 00 p. m. on every regular school day. Middle school minimum is 9 hours p/week. Before School Programs: -Operate no less than one and one-half hours each regular school day ASSETs Programs: -Operate a minimum of 15 hours per week

Item 5: Early Release / Late Arrival Policy (ASES, 21 st CCLC) • LEA/grantee

Item 5: Early Release / Late Arrival Policy (ASES, 21 st CCLC) • LEA/grantee agency has a policy regarding reasonable early daily release of pupils from the program • Must be the grantees policy, not that of the subcontractor, unless adopted by grantee or LEA. • LEA/grantee agency has a policy regarding late arrival of participants. Hours of operation and early release has been the number #1 finding to date!

Item 6: Daily Snack (ASES, 21 st CCLC, ASSETs) 1. Snack conforms to the

Item 6: Daily Snack (ASES, 21 st CCLC, ASSETs) 1. Snack conforms to the nutrition standards in Education Code 49430 2. Before school programs offer breakfast 3. Resources: School Food Calculator www. californiaprojectlean. org Snack Guide for After School www. canfit. org

Item 7: Physical Activity (ASSETs) • Include a physical activity element

Item 7: Physical Activity (ASSETs) • Include a physical activity element

Item 8: Reporting & Maintaining Records (ASES, 21 st CCLC, ASSETs) 1. Review program

Item 8: Reporting & Maintaining Records (ASES, 21 st CCLC, ASSETs) 1. Review program plan every three years 2. Maintains documentation of program plan for a minimum of five years. 3. Submits attendance data semiannually and regular school day attendance data annually.

Item 9: Collaboration (ASES, 21 st CCLC, ASSETs) • Coordinate with other federal, state,

Item 9: Collaboration (ASES, 21 st CCLC, ASSETs) • Coordinate with other federal, state, and local programs to make the most effective use of public resources.

Item 10: Inventory Records (ASES, 21 st CCLC, ASSETs) • The LEA/grantee agency maintains

Item 10: Inventory Records (ASES, 21 st CCLC, ASSETs) • The LEA/grantee agency maintains an inventory record for each piece of equipment, with an acquisition cost of $500 or more.

Dimension III – Funding

Dimension III – Funding

Item 11: Allocation of Funds (ASES, 21 st CCLC) 1. Maximum 15 percent of

Item 11: Allocation of Funds (ASES, 21 st CCLC) 1. Maximum 15 percent of total grant may be spent on administrative costs (including indirect costs) – – – Must document percentages admin vs. direct Refer to California State Accounting Manual, applies both to LEA’s and CBO grantees. Includes all admin (contractor cost) 2. ASSETs programs may spend the greater of 6 percent or $7, 500 for evaluation Showing evidence of the percentages has been the number #2 finding to date!

Item 12: Fiscal Reporting and Audit (ASES, 21 st CCLC, ASSETs) 1. Submits to

Item 12: Fiscal Reporting and Audit (ASES, 21 st CCLC, ASSETs) 1. Submits to the CDE through ASSIST – – Annual budget report Quarterly expenditure reports 2. Conducts annual fiscal audit

Item 13: Matching Funds (ASES) • ASES programs have obtained a local contribution of

Item 13: Matching Funds (ASES) • ASES programs have obtained a local contribution of cash or in-kind local funds equal to/not less than one-third of the total grant amount – Match required based on expenditure for fiscal year. • Facilities or space usage may fulfill not more than 25 percent of the local required match – 25% OF THE 33% – Ex. $112, 500/33%= $37, 125 (total in-kind) $37, 125/25%= $9, 281 (limit on facilities use) Include copies of MOU’s behind summary

Item 14: Supplement vs. Supplant (ASES, 21 st. CCLC, ASSETs) • The LEA/grantee agency

Item 14: Supplement vs. Supplant (ASES, 21 st. CCLC, ASSETs) • The LEA/grantee agency uses categorical funds only to supplement, and not supplant,

Dimension IV - Standards, Assessment, and Accountability

Dimension IV - Standards, Assessment, and Accountability

Item 15: Standards, Assessment, Accountability (21 st. CCLC, ASSETs) • An assessment of objective

Item 15: Standards, Assessment, Accountability (21 st. CCLC, ASSETs) • An assessment of objective data • Established set of performance measures • Scientifically based research – Application of rigorous, systematic, and objective procedures – Obtains reliable and valid knowledge relevant to education activities and programs • Periodic evaluation to assess progress • Results used to refine and improve the program and its performance measures • Results made available to the public

Item 16: Outcome-Based Data (ASES, 21 st. CCLC, ASSETs) • Submit annual outcome-based data

Item 16: Outcome-Based Data (ASES, 21 st. CCLC, ASSETs) • Submit annual outcome-based data for evaluation – Annual Evaluation Spreadsheet – PPICS reporting website – District Evaluation

FEDERAL APR – SEP 27

FEDERAL APR – SEP 27

Statewide Evaluation – Oct 15

Statewide Evaluation – Oct 15

Dimension V – Staffing and Professional Development

Dimension V – Staffing and Professional Development

Item 17: Staff Training (ASES, 21 st. CCLC, ASSETs) • Provide staff training and

Item 17: Staff Training (ASES, 21 st. CCLC, ASSETs) • Provide staff training and development – Must be offered by the LEA to staff, not by subcontractor. – Can be co-sponsored by LEA but must be documented on flyers with logos, etc. – Trainings as needed.

Item 18: Student-to-Staff Ratio (ASES, 21 st. CCLC, ASSETs) • Student-to-staff ratio of no

Item 18: Student-to-Staff Ratio (ASES, 21 st. CCLC, ASSETs) • Student-to-staff ratio of no more than 20 to 1. – Program wide ratios – Consider safety when running an activity with 20 or more kids

Item 19: Staff Qualifications (ASES, 21 st. CCLC, ASSETs) • Must meet the minimum

Item 19: Staff Qualifications (ASES, 21 st. CCLC, ASSETs) • Must meet the minimum qualifications for an instructional aide, as defined by the district policy. – Print out copies of job descriptions – Applies to each district under a consortium application, not by COE or CBO lead, if the agency crosses multiple districts. Minimum requirements for an instructional aide may vary by district Meeting district instructional aide requirements has been the number #4 finding to date!

Dimension VI – Opportunity and Equal Educational Access

Dimension VI – Opportunity and Equal Educational Access

Item 20: Facilities & Transportation (ASES, 21 st. CCLC, ASSETs) 1. Safe and easily

Item 20: Facilities & Transportation (ASES, 21 st. CCLC, ASSETs) 1. Safe and easily accessible facility. Transportation for students to and from the program and home. 2. If the program is located in a facility other than an elementary or secondary school, the LEA/grantee agency: – – Ensures that the program will be at least as accessible to the students as if the program were located at a school site. Provides safe transportation to pupils enrolled in the program.

Item 21: Equal Access (ASES, 21 st. CCLC, ASSETs) • The LEA/grantee agency makes

Item 21: Equal Access (ASES, 21 st. CCLC, ASSETs) • The LEA/grantee agency makes services available to all students and families of students targeted for services regardless of their ability to pay • If fees are charged, programs will use a sliding scale of fees and scholarships for those who cannot afford to participate Although it is not contrary to the law to charge fees for participation in the programs, the CDE discourages charging such fees.

Item 21: Multi-language Marketing (ASES, 21 st. CCLC, ASSETs) • The LEA/grantee agency provides

Item 21: Multi-language Marketing (ASES, 21 st. CCLC, ASSETs) • The LEA/grantee agency provides parents with information on school and parent activities in a format and, to the extent practicable, in a language the parents can understand.

Dimension VII – Teaching and Learning

Dimension VII – Teaching and Learning

Item 23: Academic & Educational Enrichment Activities (ASES, 21 st. CCLC, ASSETs) • Academic

Item 23: Academic & Educational Enrichment Activities (ASES, 21 st. CCLC, ASSETs) • Academic Enrichment – Help in meeting academic achievement standards in core content areas • Educational Enrichment – Reinforce and complement the regular academic program BASPs should be able to show the activities are aligned and coordinated with the students’ regular school day program and when appropriate, the activities should be research based and content standards aligned.

Grades Content Focus Curriculum Sing, Spell, Read and Write K-1 Intervention program for ELA

Grades Content Focus Curriculum Sing, Spell, Read and Write K-1 Intervention program for ELA Singlish 2 -3 4 -6 Intervention program for ELA Reading Triumphs GATE Certificate of Merit Intervention program for ELA and Math GATE Extended component for ELD 7 -8 Intervention program for Math (CAHSEE/Algebra readiness focus) GATE 9 -12 Reading Triumphs (ELA) Standards Plus (Math) Certificate of Merit Existing ELD curriculum (Rosetta Stone), materials and guides currently in place for ELD I, III Mathematics Skills Intervention (Prentice Hall) or CAHSEE prep materials Certificate of Merit Journalism, Film, Fine Arts, and other programs (to be determined by the site administrator, Director of ASES, and Director of Secondary Education). CAHSEE Intervention CAHSEE prep materials Credit Recovery On-Line Learning (TBD) Enrichment/Advancement/Credit Recovery On-Line Learning (TBD)

Item 24: Family Literacy (21 st. CCLC, ASSETs) • For families of students served

Item 24: Family Literacy (21 st. CCLC, ASSETs) • For families of students served – Literacy – Related educational development

Creating a file system

Creating a file system

Special Techniques. . . • After school follows district CPM process. – District offers

Special Techniques. . . • After school follows district CPM process. – District offers valuable resources – Attend district preparation meetings • Seven Program dimensions – 15% means, 15% – Lesson plans aren’t exclusive to day teachers – Keep track of big purchases – Monitors want to visit your program • Suggestions – Clearly label and categorize materials – SAVE THE TREES!; redirect readers to avoid redundancy – Avoid a disconnect with day CPM presentation – Keep attendance clean – Add up the match

Champion C. A. I. S. Tips How was your experience with using CAIS? I

Champion C. A. I. S. Tips How was your experience with using CAIS? I found the system to be very simple overall, just time consuming What problems did you encounter using it? Each time you uploaded a document to a specific domain, I found it cumbersome to have to go back to main menu to upload another document, making the process slower. Each time you saved/made changes, it took a little while to save. This may have been corrected by now though. Did you have to scan all docs or were you able to send electronic files. I scanned 90% of my documents, however, it ended up being much more than were needed. Also, I was able to provide other documentation upon request when visited by team

Champion C. A. I. S. Tips Do you have any user-friendly tips for others

Champion C. A. I. S. Tips Do you have any user-friendly tips for others using CAIS? Scan all hard copy documents to a high speed scanner if possible that automatically converts documents to. pdfs, and title each document by domain and subdomain name with a brief description of it. If a document is already in an electronic format, modify the title so that it is consistent with the domain, as mentioned previously. Any surprises overall? Just that I probably could have saved myself a lot of time in not needing to upload as many documents than were actually needed. However, there is really no way to get around this because I would rather be overly prepared than not enough.