Codesign and collaborative practices Training report Tortosa September

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Co-design and collaborative practices Training report Tortosa, September 18 th - 20 th 2019

Co-design and collaborative practices Training report Tortosa, September 18 th - 20 th 2019 by Sociolab This document was funded by the European Union’s Asylum, Migration and Integration Fund

The project BRIDGES with a partnership of 9 organisations from 5 Countries (Italy, Spain,

The project BRIDGES with a partnership of 9 organisations from 5 Countries (Italy, Spain, Austria, Croatia and Greece) has the aim to experiment collaborative cohesion practices at local level, so to strengthen the community as a whole, through the encouragement of dialogue and mutual enrichment between third-country and host-country nationals. Through sports practices, cultural activities and community services, co-designed and implemented by all community members in a participatory and inclusive process, the project allows to promote the European Union values of inclusion of migrants and solidarity among citizens, providing innovative solutions to address common needs. During a transnational meeting in Tortosa, project partners and community organizers from 4 countries gathered to explore, discuss and experiment innovative methods for co-creating community events for and with third country nationals. The training objectives were to experiment co-design and participatory approaches, forster dialogue among partners and plan together future actions. The current report is complementary to the methodology guidelines that each partner received before the training, and it is meant to be an additional tool for partners as it provides a brief description of each adopted methods and a summary of useful online resources. 1 This document was funded by the European Union’s Asylum, Migration and Integration Fund

The daily agenda The training was designed by Sociolab - the partner in charge

The daily agenda The training was designed by Sociolab - the partner in charge of the project methodology - and each day revolved around 4 moments inspired by Circle practice and Art of Hosting to construct a meaningful dialogue, whether in the space or a meeting or of a full participatory process: 1. Opening / Welcome and framing: a presentation of daily objectives and actions; 1. Check in: an activity for marking the beginning of the training and becoming present in the group; 1. Knowledge sharing and ideas through activities: Tools description and experimentation “hands on” to find shared meaning, allow new ideas to emerge and connect them ; 1. Closing : Reflection and Check out: a chance for people to reflect on the main takeaways and share their thoughts with others. 2

Day one The framing of the training was done through the practice of the

Day one The framing of the training was done through the practice of the circle, to allow participant to enter the space in an inclusive way and to practice concretely the art of being present in the moment, by speaking with intention, listening with attention and taking care of the wellbeing of the group. The check-in was done with an icebreaker activity to establish connections among participants and allowing them to know each other. We decided to use the game “ 2 truths 1 lie” because it is as much easy as effective: each participant is free to share with the group the information he/she wants to share and while playing participants have the chance to know a bit of other people’s life. How it works: each participant write down on a paper 3 sentences about themselves. One sentence has to be false. The goal of other players is to determine which statement is the false one. The rest of the morning schedule was dedicated to project updates, technical issues discussions and collective decision making on final meetings and project planning. A significant part of the daily programme was also focused on sharing data and information on national needs assessment, a specific research tool that each partner had prepared to start the co-design process. 3 This document was funded by the European Union’s Asylum, Migration and Integration Fund

To make presentation time interactive and allow mutual learning, we used an approach derived

To make presentation time interactive and allow mutual learning, we used an approach derived from appreciative inquiry and active listening: each participant had a specific question to focus on during the presentations (revolving around challenges, improvements and tools), to allow them to explore and capture significant elements. At the end of each presentation, participants read their post-it and composed a mosaic of learnings and shared meanings. What tools / Approaches are more effective? “Different activities based on different needs can happen in the same location and allow the participation of mixed groups” “To provide everyone equal opportunities to teach and learn” What improvements can we see? “Create the opportunity for a good practice to become a community practice” “Escape the “paternalistic” practice” What challenges do we face? “To contrast the negative public perception of migration/migrants” “Participation of target groups in the procedure of designing the activities” As check out activity, the group gathered in a circle where each participant used one word to describe their daily takeaways. “hope, challenges, confidence, ideas, team building, satisfaction, cooperation, inspiration, coordination, tools, expectations, convivence, potential. ” 4 This document was funded by the European Union’s Asylum, Migration and Integration Fund

Day two The second day started with the framing of the next sessions (actions

Day two The second day started with the framing of the next sessions (actions and goals) and a brief feed-forward of the topics and takeaways from day 1. As check-in, we used images as tools for sharing thoughts and personal visions. We scattered photos on the floor and invited each participants to pick one for themselves and use it to share something about their story. Using the circle method, we shared personal episodes, enhancing our understanding of each other through deep listening and thoughtful speaking. Among the topics explored through storytelling: “sense of community and togetherness, friends and their role in taking care of each other, things that make us feel alive, environmental concerns, rituals and family roots, strength and personal goals. ” The rest of the day was reserved to co-designing the project’s “call for community champions” and actual community events through the use of gamification and Art of Hosting: - A board game to plan our call to community champions: a board game where each square had a question to address together in order to create the final “call for participation”: target audience, commitment required, resources needed, inclusion and diversity, dissemination strategy. Participants worked in national teams, but to prove the advantages of cooperation over competition, the game had specific moments to exchange and share with other teams. 5 This document was funded by the European Union’s Asylum, Migration and Integration Fund

- Pro-action café: derived by combining 2 different conversation methods (World Cafè and Open

- Pro-action café: derived by combining 2 different conversation methods (World Cafè and Open Space Technology), this format allows participants to propose ideas/projects/actions they most care about and receive the help of those who are present. Participants are invited to share their seed ideas and bring in their "call for help". After writing down the agenda, the ideas to be developed are assigned to specific conversation tables and get input from other participants that split among tables and discuss with idea-creators. After each round, people move to other tables and the creator (who remain at her/his table) has the opportunity to gather feedback from others and advance in planning and collaborative codesign. After the presentation of pro-action café results, participants were invited to show their activity preferences through the method of dot voting. - Dot voting: a simple group activity for recognizing preferences among limited options. The trainer or community organizer gives participants a limited number of stickers and invites them to stick them close to their favourite options. The option(s) with the most number of dot stickers are the group favourite(s). Variations include the “traffic light” method: dot stickers are coloured in green, orange and red and participants are invited to use them to show their level of preference. The red dots can also be used to show eventual disagreement or problems related to the proposed activity. 6 This document was funded by the European Union’s Asylum, Migration and Integration Fund

For check out and reflection, we gather in a circle and spoke to the

For check out and reflection, we gather in a circle and spoke to the question: “What was significant for me today? ” It was useful to receive questions and feedback from others, it was the first time that the questions where not our own and it allowed us to discover new ideas. Very helpful tools to proceed quickly and get results in little time, I really appreciated the concrete dimension to our codesign. I feel more confident about what we have to do. The games where very fun and engaging they can be used in many occasions. I am worried about the work we need to do, I now understand more clearly how crucial is the work with the community. Yesterday we were in an unknown space. Today the space is completely different: full of colours, opinions, thoughts, hopes, love expectations. I am sad that it ends tomorrow, we started to work really well together, we stepped out of our boxes, gave each other feedback, we got a really good atmosphere. 7 This document was funded by the European Union’s Asylum, Migration and Integration Fund

Day three The third and last day was dedicated to project evaluation as a

Day three The third and last day was dedicated to project evaluation as a way of gathering collective knowledge and sharing experiences around an activity or project. After the framing of the day and a check-in activity in which each participants was invited to imaginatively share at the centre of the circle a dish that has a particular meaning in their life, explaining why they thought it was important to share it with others, participants were introduced to “the most significant change” approach to evaluation, a participatory technique which relies on engaging stakeholders in a process of recording, discussing and analysing change brought forward by a project or action. This approach involves generating and analysing personal accounts of change and deciding which of these accounts are the most significant – and why. The first step of the approach is that of exploring the dimensions of change and we did this by focused on the desired change we want to achieve by the end of the project in three dimensions: individually, in the community and in our work. To address the question, participants experienced the “triads”: participants were invited to split in groups of three and speak to the question taking turns in three different roles: speaker (who speaks with intention), listener (who listens with attention) and witnesser / observer (who observe what others cannot see and holds the space for the group). We then collectively clustered our personal answers to the questions and reflected on the dimensions of change that this project can bring about. 8 This document was funded by the European Union’s Asylum, Migration and Integration Fund

Partners identified “small but powerful changes” in all dimensions explored, confirming the complexity and

Partners identified “small but powerful changes” in all dimensions explored, confirming the complexity and multidimensional impact that a project like BRIDGES can have. Among the individual changes: People involved in the activities: feel more connected to each other and find new opportunities to socialize feel more positive are more conscious of the need to be open and to find common spaces feel empowered to continue and create new spaces/activities/projects that foster dialogue Community organizers have received institutional legitimization. Among the changes happening at the collective/community level: We can see a more positive image of community, through a change in narrative around new residents; We see an improvement in interactions and interpersonal relations among people in the local community, in particular between locals and migrants. Among the tangible results: we have engaged more diverse groups of people, not just the usual participants; we have experimented with less frontal methods to work together and with communities; we have included participatory practices in our work and in other EU projects. Among the intangible learnings: we have learned to move away from the posture that makes us say “I know” and towards “we find out together”. we have promoted a change in mentality, developed ownership of local projects and broken down walls of stereotype. 9

As a final reflection, we gather in the circle and replied to the question:

As a final reflection, we gather in the circle and replied to the question: “What do I see differently? ”. I see now more clearly how much we have in common: we have all these visual reminders of our common vision. I feel that more than ever, we are truly partners. I am usually very shy, but I felt I truly engaged in the activity and ready to apply what we did together. I feel I have new tools to do my work as community organizer. More ideas and creativity thanks to the sharing with others and the working in small groups. I am not used to these methods of working together and I see now how effective they are to reach our goals. You create a time and space where you are 100% on focus. I know much more about your project and life, I am truly happy to have met you all, I feel much richer because of this. We listened to each other, shared our experiences and connected our ideas. Participating was so pleasant and I feel much more conscious. I want to try to implement this way of doing things in my day to day work. 10

Finally, participants had the occasion to see how visual evaluation methods works with two

Finally, participants had the occasion to see how visual evaluation methods works with two tools: thermometer and the hot air balloon as ways to visually render the collective reflection. 11 This document was funded by the European Union’s Asylum, Migration and Integration Fund

Resources: The circle way 1, The circle way 2 Art of Hosting Icebreakers Pro

Resources: The circle way 1, The circle way 2 Art of Hosting Icebreakers Pro action cafè, Pro action café 2 World Cafè Dot voting Most significant change evaluation technique 12 This document was funded by the European Union’s Asylum, Migration and Integration Fund