Clicker Alternatives for InClass Polling High Low and

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Clicker Alternatives for In-Class Polling: High, Low, and No-Tech Paul Strycker CUW Physics Acknowledgements:

Clicker Alternatives for In-Class Polling: High, Low, and No-Tech Paul Strycker CUW Physics Acknowledgements: The Center for Astronomy Education at the University of Arizona • Ed Prather • Gina Brissenden

Clicker Alternatives for In-Class Polling: High, Low, and No-Tech Electronic Methods’ Strengths: • Data

Clicker Alternatives for In-Class Polling: High, Low, and No-Tech Electronic Methods’ Strengths: • Data Rich • For the Record Voting Card Method’s Strengths: • Communication Rich • Off the Record • Physically Active

Set the Classroom Environment for Active Communication This is not reality. Bill Watterson –

Set the Classroom Environment for Active Communication This is not reality. Bill Watterson – Calvin and Hobbes

God desires your mind, body, and spirit to grow and flourish.

God desires your mind, body, and spirit to grow and flourish.

Reality: all things grow Another person’s life: One person’s life:

Reality: all things grow Another person’s life: One person’s life:

Vocation: God calls each person into particular life circumstances (e. g. , marriage) and

Vocation: God calls each person into particular life circumstances (e. g. , marriage) and work (e. g. , as a student or in a career). In the duties of our circumstances and work, God performs His work in the world through us. By taking our student-vocation seriously, God will prepare us for a greater vocation.

Duties of the Student Vocation Work toward Growth and Discernment Concordia asks you to

Duties of the Student Vocation Work toward Growth and Discernment Concordia asks you to engage in the Liberal Arts as preparation for your mind, body, and spirit for service to Christ in the Church and the World.

Voting Cards • We all get to communicate. • You work for growth. •

Voting Cards • We all get to communicate. • You work for growth. • You get practice explaining your reasoning. • You discern your understanding of the concepts. • I see where we are and where to go from here.

Voting Cards • Always bring it to class. • Print your own replacements. (It

Voting Cards • Always bring it to class. • Print your own replacements. (It MUST be in color. ) • Borrow one if you forget to bring it. • Chronic borrowers will be asked for a ransom. • Fold it into quarters. • Use a blank side (folded) for “E”. • Use the whole colored side to say, “Unsure/Weird” OR “Please slow down. ”

Voting Cards • Discretely prepare your vote by refolding your card to show the

Voting Cards • Discretely prepare your vote by refolding your card to show the letter. • Simultaneous voting. • Hold your vote under your chin. • Anonymous (to everyone but me).

When did you last eat in the campus cafeteria? A. B. C. D. E.

When did you last eat in the campus cafeteria? A. B. C. D. E. The month of May This semester This academic year Prior to this academic year Never

Facilitating Voting Cards What to Say What to Do Reasons for This Step Turn

Facilitating Voting Cards What to Say What to Do Reasons for This Step Turn toward the question and read it silently, slowly pronouncing all words inside your head. Work out the solution’s logical steps and find the correct letter and color. If you read the question to the class, students will reread it to themselves after you finish. By quietly reading it yourself, you model the desired behavior while giving them space to think. Do not allow students to communicate with each other. Have them do their own thinking. This step helps them remember that their own learning is a personal responsibility and cannot be achieved for them by the instructor or their neighbor. Does anyone need more time? Turn toward the class as you ask. Look for students still obviously deciding. If more time is needed, turn back toward the question and slowly count to ten. Listen for paper-folding to settle down. Turn toward the class again. If you ask, “Is everyone ready? ” then you will always receive an unhelpful affirmative answer from part of the class. Prepare your votes and vote on three. One, two, three! Scan the colors, not the letters. Look for the level of correctness overall, but also look for pockets of wrong answers and take note of any predominate wrong answers. Students become accountable showing you their answers. Voting cards give you unique data about the physical distribution of answers. You may wish to direct the students to discuss their answers based on concerning groupings of wrong answers in the back or where students of a certain major or clique tend to sit. Nothing. Start with silent reading. Scan colors. Students think. Students are accountable.

What are the units on the answer? A. B. C. D. E. miles /

What are the units on the answer? A. B. C. D. E. miles / s feet / s miles / hour feet / mile hour / s

What are the units on the answer? A. B. C. D. E. miles /

What are the units on the answer? A. B. C. D. E. miles / s feet / s miles / hour feet / mile hour / s

Facilitating Voting Cards What to Say What to Do Reasons for This Step Turn

Facilitating Voting Cards What to Say What to Do Reasons for This Step Turn to your neighbor and convince them that your answer is correct! Give your reasoning. You may have had the same answer for different reasons. Thirty seconds. Go! Unless you want to make students aware that there was a real lack of consensus for the sake of sparking discussion, there is no need to preface this with anything about the level of correctness or which answers were popular. (I would not say more than, “Wow, a rainbow!” or, “Hmm…. , ” before having them turn to their neighbors. ) As students turn, their voting cards are still being held to their chests, which communicates their answer to their neighbor and helps start the dialogue. Students work out the reasoning. Listen to them. Regardless of how much time you think they will need, always say “thirty seconds. ” Listen to the students’ discussions, walk around the room to hear different groups (if possible), and have them re-vote when things die down or get off-topic. If you wish to guide the discussions, give the students a couple vocabulary terms/concepts that they must use. Let’s re-vote. Prepare new votes and vote on three. One, two, three. If the re-vote’s results are unsatisfactory, now is the time to ask students for their reasons for a certain answer or for their reasons against one. Do not do a second re-vote. Defending answers allows students to process what they are learning out loud, which is good practice in building (and communicating) logical arguments. It is important to motivate them early in the course with the understanding that correct reasoning is far more important than correct answers. (The question will be different on the exam, but the reasoning will be the same. ) This step will reinforce that truth while encouraging students to put the course material into their own words and analogies for one another. Correct reasoning is far more important than correct answers. After the convince-your-neighbor and re-vote steps, you know that at least half the class has practiced giving an explanation out loud (and everyone else heard someone’s explanation). Therefore, students should be more confident in speaking to the whole class about what they or a neighbor said.

Facilitating Voting Cards What to Say What to Do Reasons for This Step The

Facilitating Voting Cards What to Say What to Do Reasons for This Step The correct answer is … (students verbally respond). If you have a large class, you can have your students respond out loud with the letter of the correct answer before it is revealed. I do not recommend this for small classes (less than 20), since individual voices are too distinct. Only do this if you are sure that the combined voices of the students with the right answer will drown out the voices of the students with wrong answers. If students hear their peers collectively respond with the correct answer before it is revealed, then it becomes clear that (1) the correct answer was within reasonable reach and (2) answering wrong is a sign of falling behind the majority of the others on this concept. This is a reality check for students who may otherwise have a false perception that the whole class struggles exactly as they do. Debrief. Either you or a student should summarize the reasoning leading to the correct answer and, perhaps, the false reasoning that would lead to the wrong answers. Now that students have made a personal investment in this question, they have a compelling reason to actively listen to the explanation. Affirm the correct reasoning. The ground is prepared, and students are ready to want to listen.

If today you sent a radio message to aliens living at a distance of

If today you sent a radio message to aliens living at a distance of 500 light-years from Earth, when is the soonest that you would receive a reply? A. 2016 AD B. 2266 AD C. 2516 AD D. 2766 AD E. 3016 AD

If today you sent a radio message to aliens living at a distance of

If today you sent a radio message to aliens living at a distance of 500 light-years from Earth, when is the soonest that you would receive a reply? Radio is a form of light. A. 2016 AD B. 2266 AD C. 2516 AD D. 2766 AD E. 3016 AD It takes light 1 year to travel a distance of 1 light-year. So, you need 500 years for the radio (light) to get to the aliens and another 500 years for their radio reply to travel back.

How many different controls that cause an acceleration do you use while driving your

How many different controls that cause an acceleration do you use while driving your car? A. B. C. D. E. 1 2 3 4 5

How many different controls that cause an acceleration do you use while driving your

How many different controls that cause an acceleration do you use while driving your car? A. B. C. D. E. 1 2 3 4 5 Gas pedal – increases speed Brake pedal – decreases speed Steering wheel – changes direction of motion Any change in motion (speed or direction) is an acceleration.