Classroom Management Managing Groups Problem students North Carolina

  • Slides: 23
Download presentation
Classroom Management Managing Groups Problem students North Carolina Network for Excellence in Teaching www.

Classroom Management Managing Groups Problem students North Carolina Network for Excellence in Teaching www. nc-net. info Large Classes Class Structure

Seminar Topics v Structuring the Lesson and Managing Groups v Teaching Large Classes v

Seminar Topics v Structuring the Lesson and Managing Groups v Teaching Large Classes v Dealing with the Problem Student v Controlling Incivility North Carolina Network for Excellence in Teaching www. nc-net. info

Seminar Outcomes 1. Design ways to begin and end a class that will actively

Seminar Outcomes 1. Design ways to begin and end a class that will actively engage students. 2. Describe techniques to divide students into groups. 3. Select strategies to more effectively teach large classes. 4. Outline procedures to deal with the problem student. 5. Describe approaches to deal with incivility. North Carolina Network for Excellence in Teaching www. nc-net. info

Your Turn Assessing Your Classroom Management • How do you begin YOUR class? •

Your Turn Assessing Your Classroom Management • How do you begin YOUR class? • Do you begin the same way each time? North Carolina Network for Excellence in Teaching www. nc-net. info

Structuring the Lesson Beginnings The HOOK Ticket in the Door Tell me Something Good

Structuring the Lesson Beginnings The HOOK Ticket in the Door Tell me Something Good The Routine Endings Key Questions Ticket Out the Door Application Log North Carolina Network for Excellence in Teaching www. nc-net. info

Tips for Managing the Classroom Environment 1. Start class on time 2. End class

Tips for Managing the Classroom Environment 1. Start class on time 2. End class on time 3. Deal with disruptive students individually and focus on behaviors affecting the learning environment 4. Set policies and procedures at the beginning of the course North Carolina Network for Excellence in Teaching www. nc-net. info

Tips for Managing the Classroom Environment 5. Do not deal with students when you

Tips for Managing the Classroom Environment 5. Do not deal with students when you are emotional. 6. Know your students’ names. 7. Think prevention. 8. Be an example. 9. Make your subject relevant. 10. Teach for success. North Carolina Network for Excellence in Teaching www. nc-net. info

Teaching Large Classes • • • Taking attendance Establish ground rules via the syllabus

Teaching Large Classes • • • Taking attendance Establish ground rules via the syllabus Large classes feel small Use active learning techniques Give manageable assignments Source: Ideas adopted from: University of Maryland –Center for Teaching Excellence. “Large Classes: A Teaching Guide. ” North Carolina Network for Excellence in Teaching www. nc-net. info

Classroom incivility… …is any action that interferes with a harmonious and cooperative learning atmosphere

Classroom incivility… …is any action that interferes with a harmonious and cooperative learning atmosphere in the classroom. v Uncivil student behavior not only disrupts and negatively effects the overall learning process. North Carolina Network for Excellence in Teaching www. nc-net. info

Who is Your Difficult Student? Student who: q Packs up backpacks with 10 minutes

Who is Your Difficult Student? Student who: q Packs up backpacks with 10 minutes left before class ends? q Comes late to class? q Talks on their cell phones? q Checks email on a computer during class? q Leaves early from class. q Carries on side conversations or reads the newspaper, q Sleeps? q Speaks rudely or forcefully to other students or the instructor? q Argues or dominates the class discussion? Source: Royce, A. P. (2000). A survey of academic incivility at Indiana University: Preliminary report. Bloomington, IN: Center for Survey Research, Indiana University. Reported in Nilson, L. B. and Jackson, N. S. Combating Classroom Misconduct (Incivility) with Bills of Rights. Retrieved March 3, 2008 from www. uottawa. ca/services/tlss/iced 2004/pages/nan. htm North Carolina Network for Excellence in Teaching www. nc-net. info

Encourage Classroom Civility v Make expectations clear. Include civil behaviors v Do your part

Encourage Classroom Civility v Make expectations clear. Include civil behaviors v Do your part to create a civil climate. v Treat students with respect. Avoid sarcasm, v Establish a method for airing grievances. A v Reduce anonymity. Learn your students’ names and statement in your syllabus. dismissing their abilities, or making assumptions about them based on their age, appearance, etc. suggestion box or a comment space on the course web site. provide activities to have the students get to know each other. North Carolina Network for Excellence in Teaching www. nc-net. info

Steps to Deal With Incivility 1. Identify the problem 2. Determine the cause 3.

Steps to Deal With Incivility 1. Identify the problem 2. Determine the cause 3. Devise the solution North Carolina Network for Excellence in Teaching www. nc-net. info

Step 1: Identify the Student Behavior 6 Categories of Inappropriate Behaviors v Unattached v

Step 1: Identify the Student Behavior 6 Categories of Inappropriate Behaviors v Unattached v Disinterested v Contemptuous v Disruptive v Insubordinate v Distressed Source: Braden Stephen W. & Smith Deborah N. “Managing the College Classroom: Perspectives from an Introvert and an Extrovert. ” College Quarterly Winter 2006 - Volume 9 Number 1 North Carolina Network for Excellence in Teaching www. nc-net. info

Step 2: Determine the Cause § Not aware of what is acceptable and unacceptable

Step 2: Determine the Cause § Not aware of what is acceptable and unacceptable behavior. § Does not believe bad behavior is a problem. § Doesn’t care, and either does not want to be enrolled in a § § § particular class or even be in college. Needs or wants attention. Has life distractions Uncertain of behavioral expectations. Fear failure, rejection, looking foolish, or being rejected. Grading issues Source: Braden Stephen W. & Smith Deborah N. “Managing the College Classroom: Perspectives from an Introvert and an Extrovert. ” College Quarterly Winter 2006 - Volume 9 Number 1 North Carolina Network for Excellence in Teaching www. nc-net. info

Step 3: Devise a Solution 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Examine students’ learning

Step 3: Devise a Solution 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Examine students’ learning style. Examine instructors’ teaching styles. Use classroom assessment techniques to ascertain feedback about the teaching/learning environment. Revisit classroom ground rules and discuss them again as a class. Meet with the individual to determine reasons for behavior. Set a contract with the individual to improve behavior. North Carolina Network for Excellence in Teaching www. nc-net. info

The C. A. L. M Approach to Managing the Difficult Student C A L

The C. A. L. M Approach to Managing the Difficult Student C A L M Control SELF and the Environment Analyze the situation, gather facts, and identify issues Locate solutions that would lead to a win/win Mediate or seek external resources North Carolina Network for Excellence in Teaching www. nc-net. info

Example: Dealing with Difficult Student Worksheet Scenario: It is the first day of class

Example: Dealing with Difficult Student Worksheet Scenario: It is the first day of class and you’d like to get started, however there is a group of students in the back who are carrying on and don’t show any signs of stopping? How might you handle this situation positively and constructively? Preventative In the Moment Follow-up • Communicate classroom behavior expectations • Establish classroom ground rules and norms • Provide opportunities for dialogue using active learning strategies • Ensure clarity of instructions & time limit prior to starting activities • Address the disruption and gently refer to ground rules behavior norms • Move to an activity that mixes people up (separating disruptive students) • Stop and gently look at the students • Move to an activity and go over an speak with the disruptive students • Give students the options of staying and respecting other learners or leaving • Gently speak to students about disruptive behavior • Establish a hand signal communication that indicates disruption • Reiterate college policy for a positive learning environment for every learner • Review progress of this with students at a later date North Carolina Network for Excellence in Teaching www. nc-net. info

Other Considerations • Self-evaluate your overall tone, mannerisms, use of authority, instructional strategies •

Other Considerations • Self-evaluate your overall tone, mannerisms, use of authority, instructional strategies • Speak with other teachers about the students to find out how they handle it, and to se if the same student(s) are disrupting other classes. • Avoid approaching the students from an authority position of power. This will most likely lead to more disruption. North Carolina Network for Excellence in Teaching www. nc-net. info

Classroom Management Strategies Dealing with Disruptions ACTIVITY Form teams of four (number 1, 2,

Classroom Management Strategies Dealing with Disruptions ACTIVITY Form teams of four (number 1, 2, 3, 4). Take five minutes to discuss the question below. Then, a specific number from each team will share the team’s response. Scenario 1: You see yourself as quite a patient person, but there is one student in your class who doesn’t seem to listen and then takes up precious class time asking questions about something you have already explained. At the beginning you let it go and patiently answered the questions, but now other students are sighing and rolling their eyes every time you respond to this students’ raised hand. How would you handle this situation? North Carolina Network for Excellence in Teaching www. nc-net. info

Possible solutions to previous case scenario: 1. Ask a student who understands the directions

Possible solutions to previous case scenario: 1. Ask a student who understands the directions to explain them. Sometimes a different way of explaining helps. 2. Clearly define assignment expectations and grading methods in writing. Use rubrics. 3. Ask the student to meet you after class or at break to provide more intensive one-on-one directions. 4. Ask yourself… 1. Are my instructions clear? 2. Does this student have a particular learning style? North Carolina Network for Excellence in Teaching www. nc-net. info

Classroom Management Strategies Dealing with Disruptions Behavior: Cell phones, Pagers Possible Responses: Have a

Classroom Management Strategies Dealing with Disruptions Behavior: Cell phones, Pagers Possible Responses: Have a clearly defined policy in your course syllabus. Enforce the policy. Allow one mistake per class session, but use the mistake as a reminder for all students to turn off cell phones or pagers. North Carolina Network for Excellence in Teaching www. nc-net. info

Classroom Management Strategies Dealing with Disruptions Behavior: Poor hygiene – too much perfume, cigarette

Classroom Management Strategies Dealing with Disruptions Behavior: Poor hygiene – too much perfume, cigarette odor, strong odors can be distracting/nauseating to other students. Possible Responses: Let the offending student know that, in close quarters, some students have issues with strong smell. Suggest that for the course the odor be masked/eliminated. Behavior: Sleeping in class Possible Responses: Wake the student. Ask if he/she is ill. Encourage students to actively participate. Break up class sessions with active learning. North Carolina Network for Excellence in Teaching www. nc-net. info

Summary: Tips for Creating a Peaceful Classroom 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Summary: Tips for Creating a Peaceful Classroom 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. Be interested in your students. Communicate classroom rules clearly. Be objective, not judgmental. Address problem behavior directly and immediately. Adopt a collaborative approach. Aim for an atmosphere of mutual respect. Deal directly and immediately with incivility. Be organized. Show that you are human. Stay calm. Be prepared for situations North Carolina Network for Excellence in Teaching www. nc-net. info