Chapter 43 SelfConcept Copyright 2004 by Delmar Learning

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Chapter 43 Self-Concept Copyright 2004 by Delmar Learning, a division of Thomson Learning, Inc.

Chapter 43 Self-Concept Copyright 2004 by Delmar Learning, a division of Thomson Learning, Inc.

Self-Concept § Self-concept is an individual’s perception of self and is what helps make

Self-Concept § Self-concept is an individual’s perception of self and is what helps make each individual unique. § Positive and negative self-assessments in the physical, emotional, intellectual, and functional dimensions change over time. § Self-concept affects the ability to function and greatly influences health status. Copyright 2004 by Delmar Learning, a division of Thomson Learning, Inc. 2

Components of Self-Concept § § Identity Body image Self-esteem Role performance Copyright 2004 by

Components of Self-Concept § § Identity Body image Self-esteem Role performance Copyright 2004 by Delmar Learning, a division of Thomson Learning, Inc. 3

Interrelationship of Components of Self-Concept Copyright 2004 by Delmar Learning, a division of Thomson

Interrelationship of Components of Self-Concept Copyright 2004 by Delmar Learning, a division of Thomson Learning, Inc. 4

Components of Self-Concept § A sense of personal identity is what sets one person

Components of Self-Concept § A sense of personal identity is what sets one person apart as a unique individual. § Identity includes a person’s name, gender, ethnic identity, family status, occupation, and roles. § One’s personal identity begins to develop during childhood and is constantly reinforced and modified throughout life. Copyright 2004 by Delmar Learning, a division of Thomson Learning, Inc. 5

Components of Self-Concept § Body image is an attitude about one’s physical attributes and

Components of Self-Concept § Body image is an attitude about one’s physical attributes and characteristics, appearance, and performance. § Body image is dynamic because any change in body structure or function, including the normal changes of growth and development, can affect it. Copyright 2004 by Delmar Learning, a division of Thomson Learning, Inc. 6

Components of Self-Concept § Self-Ideal is the perception of behavior based on personal standards

Components of Self-Concept § Self-Ideal is the perception of behavior based on personal standards and selfexpectations. § Self-ideal serves as an internal regulator to support self-respect and self-esteem. Copyright 2004 by Delmar Learning, a division of Thomson Learning, Inc. 7

Components of Self-Concept § Self-esteem is the judgment of personal performance compared with the

Components of Self-Concept § Self-esteem is the judgment of personal performance compared with the self-ideal. § Self-esteem is derived from a sense of giving and receiving love, and being respected by others. Copyright 2004 by Delmar Learning, a division of Thomson Learning, Inc. 8

Components of Self-Concept § Role refers to a set of expected behaviors determined by

Components of Self-Concept § Role refers to a set of expected behaviors determined by familial, cultural, and social norms. § The level of self-esteem is dependent upon the self-perception of adequate role performance in these various social roles. Copyright 2004 by Delmar Learning, a division of Thomson Learning, Inc. 9

Components of Self-Concept § Stressors Affecting Role Performance - Role overload - Role conflict

Components of Self-Concept § Stressors Affecting Role Performance - Role overload - Role conflict • Whenever a person is unable to fulfill role responsibilities, self-concept is impaired. Copyright 2004 by Delmar Learning, a division of Thomson Learning, Inc. 10

Development of Self-Concept § Self-concept evolves throughout life and depends to an extent on

Development of Self-Concept § Self-concept evolves throughout life and depends to an extent on an individual’s developmental level. Copyright 2004 by Delmar Learning, a division of Thomson Learning, Inc. 11

Development of Self-Concept § Childhood • A child’s sense of self is shaped by

Development of Self-Concept § Childhood • A child’s sense of self is shaped by interactions with parents and siblings, through shared experiences with extended family members, and relationships with others. • Their sense of self changes as they move through each developmental stage. Copyright 2004 by Delmar Learning, a division of Thomson Learning, Inc. 12

Development of Self-Concept § Adolescence • The numerous changes in physical, emotional, and psychosocial

Development of Self-Concept § Adolescence • The numerous changes in physical, emotional, and psychosocial status during the adolescent years bring about rapid and often continuous changes in self-concept. Copyright 2004 by Delmar Learning, a division of Thomson Learning, Inc. 13

Development of Self-Concept § Adulthood • The adult’s perception of self continues to develop

Development of Self-Concept § Adulthood • The adult’s perception of self continues to develop and change as an individual progresses through the adult years. • Periods of relative stability may be interspersed with realizations of physical changes, as well as changes in roles and responsibilities. Copyright 2004 by Delmar Learning, a division of Thomson Learning, Inc. 14

Factors Affecting Self-Concept § Altered Health Status § Developmental Transitions § Experience Copyright 2004

Factors Affecting Self-Concept § Altered Health Status § Developmental Transitions § Experience Copyright 2004 by Delmar Learning, a division of Thomson Learning, Inc. 15

Assessment § Consider both the client’s developmental level and chronological age when assessing self-concept.

Assessment § Consider both the client’s developmental level and chronological age when assessing self-concept. § Determine the client’s perception of selfconcept and the factors affecting it. Copyright 2004 by Delmar Learning, a division of Thomson Learning, Inc. 16

Assessment § Assess the client’s strengths to be used as a foundation on which

Assessment § Assess the client’s strengths to be used as a foundation on which to build therapeutic interventions. • Maintain appropriate relationships • Care for self in order to meet basic needs • Adapt to stressors in a positive manner Copyright 2004 by Delmar Learning, a division of Thomson Learning, Inc. 17

Nursing Diagnoses § § § Disturbed Body Image Parental Role Conflict Disturbed Personal Identity

Nursing Diagnoses § § § Disturbed Body Image Parental Role Conflict Disturbed Personal Identity Ineffective Role Performance Chronic Low Self-Esteem Situational Low Self-Esteem Copyright 2004 by Delmar Learning, a division of Thomson Learning, Inc. 18

Nursing Diagnoses § § § Disturbed Personal Identity Anxiety Social Isolation Hopelessness Powerlessness Copyright

Nursing Diagnoses § § § Disturbed Personal Identity Anxiety Social Isolation Hopelessness Powerlessness Copyright 2004 by Delmar Learning, a division of Thomson Learning, Inc. 19

Outcome Identification and Planning § Outcome statements reflect specific behavior that is measurable and

Outcome Identification and Planning § Outcome statements reflect specific behavior that is measurable and that has an appropriate time frame for evaluation. § The nurse and client develop mutually established objectives. This encourages the client to assume an active role in recovery. Copyright 2004 by Delmar Learning, a division of Thomson Learning, Inc. 20

Implementation § Initiate Therapeutic Interaction § Support Healthy Defense Mechanisms § Ensure Satisfaction of

Implementation § Initiate Therapeutic Interaction § Support Healthy Defense Mechanisms § Ensure Satisfaction of Needs • • Physical needs Psychosocial needs Copyright 2004 by Delmar Learning, a division of Thomson Learning, Inc. 21

Implementation § Promote positive self-esteem across the life span • Childhood • Adolescence •

Implementation § Promote positive self-esteem across the life span • Childhood • Adolescence • Adulthood Copyright 2004 by Delmar Learning, a division of Thomson Learning, Inc. 22

Evaluation § A client’s behavior and attitudes will reflect the degree of progress toward

Evaluation § A client’s behavior and attitudes will reflect the degree of progress toward restoring an altered self-concept. § The nurse must reconsider the alignment of the client’s targeted self-concept with the plan of care to assess if the two are still congruent. Copyright 2004 by Delmar Learning, a division of Thomson Learning, Inc. 23

Evaluation § Because self-concept is based on personal attitudes and feelings, it often requires

Evaluation § Because self-concept is based on personal attitudes and feelings, it often requires months or even years to change. Copyright 2004 by Delmar Learning, a division of Thomson Learning, Inc. 24