Chapter 3 Banquet Organization 2007 Thomson Delmar Learning

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Chapter 3 Banquet Organization © 2007 Thomson Delmar Learning. All Rights Reserved.

Chapter 3 Banquet Organization © 2007 Thomson Delmar Learning. All Rights Reserved.

The Chef’s Responsibility • Safety and Welfare of Employees and Guests • Kitchen Layout

The Chef’s Responsibility • Safety and Welfare of Employees and Guests • Kitchen Layout and Design • Banquet Room Layout and Design • Buffet Planning and Presentation • The Guest Experience © 2007 Thomson Delmar Learning. All Rights Reserved.

Kitchen Layout and Design • The Garde Manger Preparation Zone – Two-bay vegetable prep

Kitchen Layout and Design • The Garde Manger Preparation Zone – Two-bay vegetable prep sink with drain board and garbage disposal – Metal-top prep table with utensil drawer – Meat grinder and sausage horn – Floor or table-top mixer – Side-by-side reach-in coolers – Vacuum processing machine © 2007 Thomson Delmar Learning. All Rights Reserved.

Kitchen Layout and Design • The Garde Manger Cooking Zone – Range-top oven –

Kitchen Layout and Design • The Garde Manger Cooking Zone – Range-top oven – Combi-oven – Vegetable steamer – Smoker – Microwave oven – Ice cream freezer – Pot rack © 2007 Thomson Delmar Learning. All Rights Reserved.

Kitchen Layout and Design • The Garde Manger Presentation Zone – Plate racks –

Kitchen Layout and Design • The Garde Manger Presentation Zone – Plate racks – Rolling racks – Metal-top table with under-shelving for mirror and platter storage – Glass-door reach-in coolers, roll-in coolers, or walk-in cooler for distribution – Conveyor system © 2007 Thomson Delmar Learning. All Rights Reserved.

Kitchen Layout and Design • Storage – Maintaining food quality depends on: • •

Kitchen Layout and Design • Storage – Maintaining food quality depends on: • • Quality of the raw product Procedures used during processing Procedures and method of storage Length of storage © 2007 Thomson Delmar Learning. All Rights Reserved.

Dry Storage • Always rotate stock to prevent spoilage • Mark “received dates” on

Dry Storage • Always rotate stock to prevent spoilage • Mark “received dates” on containers, and use products before their expiration date • Store products in cool, dry areas with adequate ventilation and lighting • Store and keep products at least 6 inches off floors with proper use of washable shelving and storage racks • Watch for signs of rodents and bug infestations © 2007 Thomson Delmar Learning. All Rights Reserved.

Freezer Storage • Keep freezer temperature at or below 0ºF • Use moisture-proof, freezer-weight

Freezer Storage • Keep freezer temperature at or below 0ºF • Use moisture-proof, freezer-weight wrap • Food stored beyond the recommended time will be safe to eat, but eating quality (flavor and texture) and nutritive value will be less • Keep an inventory of freezer contents © 2007 Thomson Delmar Learning. All Rights Reserved.

Refrigerator Storage • Check to make sure temperatures remain between 34ºF and 40ºF •

Refrigerator Storage • Check to make sure temperatures remain between 34ºF and 40ºF • Avoid opening frequently • When possible, use separate refrigeration for different types of products: – Meat and poultry: 32ºF to 36ºF – Fish and shellfish: 30ºF to 34ºF © 2007 Thomson Delmar Learning. All Rights Reserved.

Refrigerator Storage – Dairy products: 36ºF to 40ºF – Eggs: 38ºF to 40ºF –

Refrigerator Storage – Dairy products: 36ºF to 40ºF – Eggs: 38ºF to 40ºF – Produce: 40ºF to 45ºF • Raw meat, fish, poultry, shucked shellfish, and shrimp should be wrapped securely • Cooked meats, platter presentations, and leftovers should be wrapped securely © 2007 Thomson Delmar Learning. All Rights Reserved.

Refrigerator Storage • Avoid cross-contamination of other foods • Avoid dehydration of products •

Refrigerator Storage • Avoid cross-contamination of other foods • Avoid dehydration of products • Avoid transference of odors and flavors © 2007 Thomson Delmar Learning. All Rights Reserved.

Banquet Room Layout and Design • A successful event begins with a well-conceived space

Banquet Room Layout and Design • A successful event begins with a well-conceived space – Considerations: • Access to banquet kitchen and service staff stations • Relational activities, such as break-out rooms or ice-breaker receptions • Support needs • Light and air • Audiovisual requirements • Need for and placement of access and egress © 2007 Thomson Delmar Learning. All Rights Reserved.

Buffet Planning and Presentation • Table shapes • Risers • Platters • Mirrors ©

Buffet Planning and Presentation • Table shapes • Risers • Platters • Mirrors © 2007 Thomson Delmar Learning. All Rights Reserved.

The Guest Experience • • Sanitation Safety Facility Conditions Staff Training Attention to Detail

The Guest Experience • • Sanitation Safety Facility Conditions Staff Training Attention to Detail Menu Quality Service © 2007 Thomson Delmar Learning. All Rights Reserved.

First Impressions: Engaging the Senses • Aroma • Temperature • Texture © 2007 Thomson

First Impressions: Engaging the Senses • Aroma • Temperature • Texture © 2007 Thomson Delmar Learning. All Rights Reserved.

Themes and Special Events • Buffet concept, such as: seasonal, theme, occasion, ethnic, or

Themes and Special Events • Buffet concept, such as: seasonal, theme, occasion, ethnic, or personal • Menu selections, arrangements, and zones • Food aromas, shapes, colors, sizes, and textures • Front-of-the-house activity • Showmanship with ice, tallow, and vegetable sculptures • Flourishes and touches © 2007 Thomson Delmar Learning. All Rights Reserved.

The Total Experience • Some methods of creating participative dining include: – Offering live

The Total Experience • Some methods of creating participative dining include: – Offering live cooking stations – Providing cooking classes and demonstrations – Holding the event in conjunction with another event – Allowing guests to make their own ice cream sundaes, etc © 2007 Thomson Delmar Learning. All Rights Reserved.

Building Food Displays • • • Form and Function The Wow Factor The Now

Building Food Displays • • • Form and Function The Wow Factor The Now Factor Traditional Service Patterns Communicating the Dining Pattern © 2007 Thomson Delmar Learning. All Rights Reserved.

Food Zones • Typical zones include: – – – – Fruit displays Cut vegetables

Food Zones • Typical zones include: – – – – Fruit displays Cut vegetables and salads Relishes and dips Cheese displays Charcuterie displays Smoked meats and seafood Hot and cold appetizers Petite fours © 2007 Thomson Delmar Learning. All Rights Reserved.

Food Scatter Stations • Typical stations include: – – – – Pasta bars Carving

Food Scatter Stations • Typical stations include: – – – – Pasta bars Carving stations Hot foods Cold foods Beverage stations Dessert stations Wedding cake stations Bread stations © 2007 Thomson Delmar Learning. All Rights Reserved.

Service Lines and Traffic Flow • Size and shape of lines and tables add

Service Lines and Traffic Flow • Size and shape of lines and tables add to mood or meal – Round, rectangular, square, oval, serpentine – Platter design, chafers, service bowls – Backup © 2007 Thomson Delmar Learning. All Rights Reserved.

Arranging the Buffet • • Traffic flow Space allocation Accessibility Food arrangements Accompaniments Centerpieces

Arranging the Buffet • • Traffic flow Space allocation Accessibility Food arrangements Accompaniments Centerpieces Other decorations Signage © 2007 Thomson Delmar Learning. All Rights Reserved.