Chapter 3 A Comprehensive Helping Profession Morales What

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Chapter 3 A Comprehensive Helping Profession Morales

Chapter 3 A Comprehensive Helping Profession Morales

What Is Your Social Responsibility

What Is Your Social Responsibility

Introduction Human services has been an essential part of US society. l Society wants

Introduction Human services has been an essential part of US society. l Society wants to ensure basic needs are met of human kind. l l Natural helpers- ind’s in society that support and help other ind in society. l Professional Helpers- natural helper who have knowledge and skills to help inds in resolving problems and meeting needs. SW use the support from natural helper to assist in the change process and after termination (support system)

Social Work l Most comprehensive of human service occupation. l PIE- Person in Environment

Social Work l Most comprehensive of human service occupation. l PIE- Person in Environment l Social workers look at the whole aspect of the person and create change thru empowerment of strength based perspective. l Ecomap- used to identify systems involved in an ind’s life.

Central Themes l 5 themes reflect SW characteristics n 1 commitment to social Bettermentimproving

Central Themes l 5 themes reflect SW characteristics n 1 commitment to social Bettermentimproving the quality of life for all of society. This is a central value of SW profession. Primary concern with most vulnerable populations. Who is the most vulnerable population? n Social change is often met by resistance by ind who want to maintain the status quo.

l 2 Goal to enhance social functioning- n Helping ind’s overall social functioning interacts

l 2 Goal to enhance social functioning- n Helping ind’s overall social functioning interacts with others and social institutions. Life stress create concerns for those who are unable to adapt for whatever reason. SW help inds with the change needed to functioning adequately. l 3 Action Orientation- n SW do not just want to identify the problems but want to change them. This is why SW is an applied science.

l 4 Appreciation of Human Diversityn l Work well with a wide diverse population.

l 4 Appreciation of Human Diversityn l Work well with a wide diverse population. SW’s themselves are very diverse. Diversity is seen as a need and strength in our society. SWs value the differences in our world and use those to aid the change process. 5 Versatile Practice Perspective. SWs work with a wide range of populations and problems. This is why one basic approach does not work. SW must have a base of knowledge related to human behavior and understand of a wide range of approaches to use on clients. SWs must use ind clients differences and adjust approaches to meet client’s ind needs. n Look at case study pg 34 -36. Break down into groups of 3 and identify ind needs and strengths. n

Mission of Social Work The fundamental mission is serving people in need and, at

Mission of Social Work The fundamental mission is serving people in need and, at the same time, making social institutions more responsive to people. l 3 primary purposes l n 1 Caring- knowledge is needed; however, caring is what makes people feel comfortable and cope with stress. Caring involves a wide array of services depending on ind’s needs. SW foster caring environment within the community to care for inds in need.

n 2 Curing- SW provide treatment of ind and families experiencing problems with social

n 2 Curing- SW provide treatment of ind and families experiencing problems with social functioning. Services vary depending on clients needs. Most SW would say they do not cure just help ind’s use own strength to resolve conflict. n 3 Changing Society- 3 rd primary purpose, change by laws, procedures, and attitudes of society as a whole. Today SWs cont. to work to change legislation to create new social programs to change factors contributing to damaging social conditions.

Defining Social Work l How social define themselves- 3 concerted efforts 1920 - they

Defining Social Work l How social define themselves- 3 concerted efforts 1920 - they could not come to a concise on a definition n 1950 - Emerge NASW created unity for the first time. In 1958 a working definition was developedestablished 3 common goals of SW practice n Assist ind’s and groups to resolve and reduce problems l Identify problem with ind’s and groups within their environment to prevent problems l Identify strengths to help inds and group maximize the potential. l

l 3 rd definition 1970 -80 n SW is a professional activity of helping

l 3 rd definition 1970 -80 n SW is a professional activity of helping ind’s, groups, and communities enhance or restore their capacity for social functioning and creating societal conditions favorable to that goal. n This definition is clear and encompass all aspects of social work mission. n What are these? (page 39) n Look at figure 3. 1 (depicts the unique focus of social work)

Social Work Practice Approaches l Traditional Practice Methods- Mary Richmond focused on ind’s and

Social Work Practice Approaches l Traditional Practice Methods- Mary Richmond focused on ind’s and families practice. Freudian psychology influenced this practice with holding the ind responsible. l Later more focus was placed on the PIE and not just the ind. Group social work emerged later in the 1930’s and was the 2 nd distinct method. l The 3 rd was practice within the communities. Out of the developing community agencies and practice came the need for administration and research in the 1940’s. 3 levels of practice identified: Micro, Mezzo, and Macro

l Multimethod Practice Approach- Hollis. Taylor report in 1951 recommended the use of all

l Multimethod Practice Approach- Hollis. Taylor report in 1951 recommended the use of all areas of practice put into one. l Generalist Practice Approach- emerged in the late 1960’s it provided a versatile approach. n 2 fundamental components- 1. PIE, 2. identifying best modality for the client and their ind differences and needs. n Model recognized generic foundation for all SW l Knowledge, values, purpose, sensitive to diversity, communication, understanding of human relationship and others.

Generalist Practice n SW’s Generalist perspective l 1 informed regarding sociobehavioral and ecosystem knowledge

Generalist Practice n SW’s Generalist perspective l 1 informed regarding sociobehavioral and ecosystem knowledge l 2 incorporation ideologies that include democracy, humanism, and empowerment l 3 requires a SW to be theoretically and methodologically open to client’s situation. l 4 Client-centered and problem-focused l 5 Considers direct and indirect interventions l 6 research based

n 2 generalist levels l Initial- built on generic foundation, must be capable of

n 2 generalist levels l Initial- built on generic foundation, must be capable of : Engaging effectively in interpersonal helping n Managing the change process n Appropriately selecting and utilizing multilevel interventions n Intervening in multi-sized systems n Performing a varied roles n Assessing and examining one’s own practice n Functioning successfully in an agency. n l Advanced- engages in more involved practice task which requires increased knowledge and skills (Master’s degree or further)

l Specialist Practice Approach- there a number of specialist practices that have emerged. The

l Specialist Practice Approach- there a number of specialist practices that have emerged. The knowledge and skills are more focused to: n Field of practice- families, children, youth… n Problem areas-crime, substance abuse… n Population-at-risk- children and youth, aged, single parents… n Intervention methods or roles- specific practice approaches, social planning… n Practice context and perspectiveshospitals, rural areas, …

Social Workers: Many Faces l Early SWs were primary volunteers and needed no specialized

Social Workers: Many Faces l Early SWs were primary volunteers and needed no specialized training. n BSW- 1970’s (fully professional degree) n MSW-1950’s- still today considered the terminal degree. n DSW/PH. D- increasing; however, DSW programs do not have to be accredited by CSWE

NASW l NASW classification in 1981 - n Basic Professional- BSW n Specialized Professional-

NASW l NASW classification in 1981 - n Basic Professional- BSW n Specialized Professional- MSW n Independent Professional- 2 years post MSW under supervision by a professional and successful completion of ACSW exam. n Advanced Professional- Special theoretical, practice, administration, or policy proficiency; or ability to conduct advanced research or studies in social welfare, usually demonstrated thru a doctoral degree in SW or closely related field.

Challenges to Social Work

Challenges to Social Work

Today’s SW l Lets look at Table 3. 1 (p. 46) l What SW?

Today’s SW l Lets look at Table 3. 1 (p. 46) l What SW? do you think of the population of Ability to work with all aged people Culturally competent Ability to work with diverse client conditions