Call It Courage By Armstrong Sperry Objectives To

  • Slides: 21
Download presentation
Call It Courage By: Armstrong Sperry

Call It Courage By: Armstrong Sperry

Objectives: • To identify various figurative language examples within the text including similes, metaphors,

Objectives: • To identify various figurative language examples within the text including similes, metaphors, and personification.

Objective: To identify different types of figurative language and interpret them Figurative and Literal

Objective: To identify different types of figurative language and interpret them Figurative and Literal Language Literally: words function exactly as defined The car is blue. He caught the football. Figuratively: figure out what it means I’ve got your back. You’re a doll. Figures of Speech

Simile **Comparison of two things using “like” or “as. ” Examples: The metal twisted

Simile **Comparison of two things using “like” or “as. ” Examples: The metal twisted like a ribbon. She is as sweet as candy.

Important! Using “like” or “as” doesn’t make a simile. A comparison must be made.

Important! Using “like” or “as” doesn’t make a simile. A comparison must be made. Not a Simile: I like pizza. Simile: The moon is like a pizza.

Metaphor **Two things are compared without using “like” or “as. ” Examples: • All

Metaphor **Two things are compared without using “like” or “as. ” Examples: • All the world is a stage. • Her heart is stone.

Personification ***Giving human traits to objects or ideas. Examples: • The sunlight danced. •

Personification ***Giving human traits to objects or ideas. Examples: • The sunlight danced. • Water on the lake shivers. • The streets are calling me.

PRACTICE

PRACTICE

Simile, Metaphor, or Personification? He drew a line as straight as an arrow.

Simile, Metaphor, or Personification? He drew a line as straight as an arrow.

Simile, Metaphor, or Personification? The sun was beating down on me.

Simile, Metaphor, or Personification? The sun was beating down on me.

Simile, Metaphor, or Personification? • The clouds smiled down at me.

Simile, Metaphor, or Personification? • The clouds smiled down at me.

Simile, Metaphor, or Personification? • She is as sweet as candy

Simile, Metaphor, or Personification? • She is as sweet as candy

17. • The wheat field was a sea of gold.

17. • The wheat field was a sea of gold.

Simile, Metaphor, or Personification? • The streets called to him.

Simile, Metaphor, or Personification? • The streets called to him.

Simile, Metaphor, or Personification? • She was as white as a ghost.

Simile, Metaphor, or Personification? • She was as white as a ghost.

Simile, Metaphor, or Personification? • Your face is killing me!

Simile, Metaphor, or Personification? • Your face is killing me!

EXAMPLES FROM STORY: “The curve of the beach reached out like two great arms

EXAMPLES FROM STORY: “The curve of the beach reached out like two great arms to enclose the lagoon” “The wind of the sea swept up around him, its voice warm” “But the forgiving jungle, through fertile centuries had crept back up the slopes clothing them in green” “These endless legions of trees seemed to close in upon him, imprison him with reaching arms. . . “

Review: What is a simile? What is a metaphor? What is personification?

Review: What is a simile? What is a metaphor? What is personification?

VOCABULARY – CHAPTER 3 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

VOCABULARY – CHAPTER 3 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. amethyst – purple quartz (hard mineral) luxuriant – abundant in growth, very fertile coral- the limestone skeleton of a tiny sea animal solitude- being alone alien- foreign vantage- a place or position affording a good view of something congealed- turned from liquid to solid sparingly-a small amount eerie- strange and frightening instinct- a behavior that is patterned throughout a species; unlearned behavior breadfruit-a large, tropical fruit cone-a shape whose base is a circle and whose sides taper up to a point apprehension-fear rude-roughly made or done plateau-raised area of level land

VOCABULARY – CHAPTER 3 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

VOCABULARY – CHAPTER 3 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. amethyst luxuriant coral solitude alien vantage congealed sparingly eerie instinct breadfruit cone apprehension rude plateau

REVIEW: Character Conflict: • What are the two main types of character conflict? •

REVIEW: Character Conflict: • What are the two main types of character conflict? • What are the categories? • What is the MAJOR conflict in our story POINT OF VIEW: • What narrator point of view is used to tell our story?