CA Career Pathways Trust East Bay Career Pathways

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CA Career Pathways Trust: East Bay Career Pathways Consortium December 4, 2014 Chabot College

CA Career Pathways Trust: East Bay Career Pathways Consortium December 4, 2014 Chabot College

Secondary & Postsecondary Partners K-12 Districts • Alameda Unified School District • Albany Unified

Secondary & Postsecondary Partners K-12 Districts • Alameda Unified School District • Albany Unified School District • Berkeley Unified School District • Castro Valley Unified School District • Emery Unified School District • Hayward Unified School District • Oakland Unified School District • Piedmont Unified School District • San Leandro Unified School District • San Lorenzo Unified School District • West Contra Costa Unified School District • Alameda County Office of Education Community Colleges • Berkeley City College • Chabot College • College of Alameda • Contra Costa College • Laney College • Merritt College • Cal State East Bay and UC Berkeley are included as unfunded post-secondary partners Alameda County Office of Education

Collective Impact • “the commitment of a group of important actors from different sectors

Collective Impact • “the commitment of a group of important actors from different sectors to a common agenda for solving a specific social problem. ” (Source: Collective Impact, Stanford Social Innovation Review, Winter 2011)

Collective Impact • “initiatives involve a centralized infrastructure, a dedicated staff, and a structured

Collective Impact • “initiatives involve a centralized infrastructure, a dedicated staff, and a structured process that leads to a common agenda, shared measurement, continuous communication, and mutually reinforcing activities among all participants. ” (Source: Collective Impact, Stanford Social Innovation Review, Winter 2011)

Collective Impact • “Although rare […] successful examples of collective impact are addressing social

Collective Impact • “Although rare […] successful examples of collective impact are addressing social issues that, like education, require many different players to change their behavior in order to solve a complex problem. ” (Source: Collective Impact, Stanford Social Innovation Review, Winter 2011)

The Complex Problem • The Complex Problem: A skills gap, unemployment + unfilled jobs

The Complex Problem • The Complex Problem: A skills gap, unemployment + unfilled jobs Remediation crisis, high non-completion rates

Project goal and strategy GOAL: develop pathways that prepare students for further education and

Project goal and strategy GOAL: develop pathways that prepare students for further education and rewarding employment STRATEGY: regional and local teams, with crosscutting support

Percentage of persons 25 through 29, by highest level of educational attainment: Selected years,

Percentage of persons 25 through 29, by highest level of educational attainment: Selected years, 1940 through 2010 Percent High school completion or higher Less than high school completion Bachelor’s or higher degree Year

 • • • Built when a HS diploma could get you a good

• • • Built when a HS diploma could get you a good job Not aligned to real labor market demand Lacks adequate support for transition to college Students arrive and end up in remediation It doesn’t do enough to help students set goals Does not reflect the new priorities of K 12 education

 • • • Integrates academic and career themed curriculum Strengthens opportunities for college

• • • Integrates academic and career themed curriculum Strengthens opportunities for college credit in HS That incorporates work and project based learning Provides early matriculation and advising Defines students as shared customers Allows students to ID many options for work or continuing education

K 12 / Community College / K 14 Pathways High School pathways -- defined

K 12 / Community College / K 14 Pathways High School pathways -- defined Community College pathways – defined K-14 pathways – the innovation

Student Transitions K-12 CCSS & CTE Integration, Early College Credit Post Secondary Improved Academic

Student Transitions K-12 CCSS & CTE Integration, Early College Credit Post Secondary Improved Academic Placement High Quality Career Pathways Integrated Counseling Services Better Jobs & Lives

Student Transitions Pathways Imperative Remediation Crisis – Improved Placement (Y 1) CCSS, NGSS -Matriculation

Student Transitions Pathways Imperative Remediation Crisis – Improved Placement (Y 1) CCSS, NGSS -Matriculation and Persistence Completion Early College Credit and Early Experiences Curriculum

Early College Credit • Early opportunities for high school students to explore college and

Early College Credit • Early opportunities for high school students to explore college and career options and enroll in college courses while still in high school • Includes dual enrollment/credit, concurrent enrollment and summer bridge • Provides a supportive and aligned bridge into college and career pathways for students • Creating dual enrollment courses is an excellent way for community college faculty and high school instructors to engage ongoing conversations around aligning curricula and pathways

Early College Credit: An Opportunity to Improve Student Outcomes Dr. Diane Hollems Dean of

Early College Credit: An Opportunity to Improve Student Outcomes Dr. Diane Hollems Dean of Education Programs

Reduce Remediation by Improving College Academic Placement John J. Hetts Former Director of Institutional

Reduce Remediation by Improving College Academic Placement John J. Hetts Former Director of Institutional Research Long Beach City College

Santa Barbara City College Dual Enrollment Program (The Overview) CCPT Meeting Chabot College December

Santa Barbara City College Dual Enrollment Program (The Overview) CCPT Meeting Chabot College December 4, 2014 Diane Hollems, Ph. D.

Introduction Dr. Diane Hollems Dean of Education Programs

Introduction Dr. Diane Hollems Dean of Education Programs

Overview of this Presentation • Why Dual Enrollment (vs. Articulation)? • Benefits to stakeholders

Overview of this Presentation • Why Dual Enrollment (vs. Articulation)? • Benefits to stakeholders • SBCC Dual Enrollment Program core values • Outcome data • Relationships with Secondary Schools

Why Dual Enrollment? We found that everything covered in the traditional “CTE articulation meeting”

Why Dual Enrollment? We found that everything covered in the traditional “CTE articulation meeting” could be mirrored in doing a “SBCC/high school articulation meeting. ” This covers both general education courses and CTE.

Program History & 3 Core Values

Program History & 3 Core Values

California Dual Enrollment Legislation • Senate Bill 292 • Ed. Code, section 76300 •

California Dual Enrollment Legislation • Senate Bill 292 • Ed. Code, section 76300 • Senate Bill 338

Senate Bill 292 (1996): HS ADA & College FTE: • School districts can claim

Senate Bill 292 (1996): HS ADA & College FTE: • School districts can claim full ADA for dually enrolled students as long as they are enrolled in and attend high school for 240 minutes a day. • SBCC requires that each student be enrolled in HS only classes for 240 minutes per day (~ 4 or 5 periods per day), anything above that can be Dual Enrollment and claimed by SBCC.

Senate Bill 338 (2003)/Ed Code 76001: SBCC Guidelines 1. A CC may admit special

Senate Bill 338 (2003)/Ed Code 76001: SBCC Guidelines 1. A CC may admit special part-time (fees may be waived, up to 11 units) and fulltime students (fees can not be waived). 2. Class open to the general public, if on the high school campus it must be during a time that the campus is open to the public. 3. Class is advertised, if only on web then advertised 30 days prior to the start of class. 4. A CC may restrict admissions/enrollment by: age, grade level and demonstrated eligibility such as assessment. 5. Principal approval and parent approval is required. • • • SBCC waives all fees for part-time students taking the class on the high school campus, but not for 12 or more units. We have an MOU with our local high school districts and have a process by which we contact the regular SBCC students that have enrolled. Are classes are coded off-campus with the high school location (e. g. , DPHS, SBHS, etc. ). We advertise our classes 30 days prior to the time they start. Some of our classes are restricted such as math or English that require placement into the correct level in order to be enrolled in the class. We also adhere to pre-requisites foreign language classes. We secure principal/counselor, parent and student signatures to enroll.

Program Core #1: Planning: Prior to the start of our program, SBCC administration met

Program Core #1: Planning: Prior to the start of our program, SBCC administration met extensively with high school administrators and faculty to build relationships and create a plan that would be a “WIN” for everyone, especially students and their parents.

Program Core #2: Service: The Dual Enrollment Program has been built with the philosophy

Program Core #2: Service: The Dual Enrollment Program has been built with the philosophy that SBCC will bring college classes to each high school to provide access.

Program Core #3: Collaboration: Building and sustaining relationships is our #1 priority in program

Program Core #3: Collaboration: Building and sustaining relationships is our #1 priority in program management.

Benefits to all Stakeholders: Post-Secondary Institution: – Students generate a transcript – Students stay

Benefits to all Stakeholders: Post-Secondary Institution: – Students generate a transcript – Students stay on pathway – FTEs are collected on students enrolled in the DE section Secondary school: – – Change in school climate/culture Students head start on career pathway Students motivated to take more Dual Enrollment and/or AP classes Students generate a college transcript Parents: – Substantial savings on the student’s college education – Demystifying the college process

SBCC Dual Enrollment Program Details: 1. We offer college classes on-site at our local

SBCC Dual Enrollment Program Details: 1. We offer college classes on-site at our local high school campuses, before school, during the day and after school. This is in addition to K 12 students taking classes on the main SBCC campus. For the purposes of this presentation, we will just be discussing Dual Enrollment classes taught at the high school campuses. 2. Classes at high school sites are offered in 15 academic and 16 career technical disciplines, with more than 100 classes each semester (credit is awarded on an SBCC transcript that semester). 3. Our enrollment is between 2, 500 and 3, 000 (non-duplicative headcount) per year (fall and spring only).

Outcome Data Former dual enrollment students* who matriculate to SBCC: • Are more likely

Outcome Data Former dual enrollment students* who matriculate to SBCC: • Are more likely to enroll full-time in college (67% compared to 54%) • Require less remediation and placed at the college transfer level course at a higher rate than their direct entry peers (Math: 26. 4% compared to 18%; Reading: 25. 9% compared to 9. 9%; Writing: 34. 8% compared to 14. 6%) • Earn a higher average cumulative GPA (after three academic years , 2. 47 vs. 2. 02) • Earn more transferable college units (after three years, 43 vs. 29) *Note: Sample was comprised of 764 first-time college students who graduated from a local service-area high school in spring 2008 and matriculated to SBCC in fall 2008

Relationships with Secondary Schools & Districts

Relationships with Secondary Schools & Districts

Contact Information: Dr. Diane Hollems Santa Barbara City College 721 Cliff Drive Santa Barbara,

Contact Information: Dr. Diane Hollems Santa Barbara City College 721 Cliff Drive Santa Barbara, CA 93109 (805) 693 -8281 [email protected] edu

Thank You!

Thank You!

Career Pathways and the Common Core: Innovative Solutions for Brighter Futures L. Karen Monroe

Career Pathways and the Common Core: Innovative Solutions for Brighter Futures L. Karen Monroe Superintendent-Elect, Alameda County Schools

Building Regional Infrastructure Regional Data Sharing Infrastructure Regional Industry Engagement Infrastructure Regional Strategies for

Building Regional Infrastructure Regional Data Sharing Infrastructure Regional Industry Engagement Infrastructure Regional Strategies for Addressing Barriers to Inter-segmental Transitions Health & Biosciences Engineering & Advanced Manufacturing ICT & Digital Media Public Service & Law

East Bay Career Pathways Priorities Pathway Development Successful Transitions Career Connections

East Bay Career Pathways Priorities Pathway Development Successful Transitions Career Connections

Challenge for K 12: Prepare for college AND career 20 th century: college or

Challenge for K 12: Prepare for college AND career 20 th century: college or career 21 st century: college and career Pathways can deliver on this promise

3 strongest predictors of lifetime earnings • Years of schooling completed • Cognitive achievement

3 strongest predictors of lifetime earnings • Years of schooling completed • Cognitive achievement measured by test scores • Various non-cognitive skills College & career pathways can improve all of these. Source: Making it Real: How High Schools Can Be Held Accountable for Improving Students’ Career Readiness. PACE Policy Brief 13 -2

Shift from voc ed to CTE • 1917 federal law defined voc ed as

Shift from voc ed to CTE • 1917 federal law defined voc ed as prep for occupations not requiring a bachelor’s or advanced degree • By the 1980 s tracking students into programs that did not give them the option of going to college was increasingly seen as unfair and inefficient • Federal law started to require integration of vocational and academic education, renamed voc ed as CTE in 2006

Dilemma for high schools: Most students in first year of high school expect to

Dilemma for high schools: Most students in first year of high school expect to complete a college degree or more (72% of those who gave an answer; 56% of whole sample) but only about 1/3 of 25 -29 year olds have bachelor’s degrees, and that number is growing very slowly. Sources: US Dept of Education, National Center for Education Statistics: The High School Longitudinal Study of 2009, NCES 2011 -327, 2011. Digest of Education Statistics 2010.

College & career pathways • Postsecondary education should be an option for all who

College & career pathways • Postsecondary education should be an option for all who want it • More focused and engaging curriculum, with work-based learning, motivates students to learn and graduate • Students gain work-related skills to help support them through college, or to enter labor market without degree

Research has found benefits during high school… Compared with similar students at the same

Research has found benefits during high school… Compared with similar students at the same high schools, career academy students show more improvement in attendance, grades, credits earned, and are more likely to stay in high school

…and after high school • Maxwell study found academy students more likely to finish

…and after high school • Maxwell study found academy students more likely to finish bachelor’s degree • MDRC random-assignment study found positive effects on earnings 8 years after high school, with no reduction in postsecondary educational attainment Source: Career Academies, a Proven Strategy to Prepare High School Students for College and Careers http: //casn. berkeley. edu/resources. php? r=158&c=1

CPA and California 12 th-grade graduation rates, 2004 -05 and 2009 -10 Source: Profile

CPA and California 12 th-grade graduation rates, 2004 -05 and 2009 -10 Source: Profile of California Partnership Academies 2009 -10, http: //casn. berkeley. edu/resources. php? r=293&c=1

CPA and California graduates completing a-g course requirements for CSU and UC, 2004 -05

CPA and California graduates completing a-g course requirements for CSU and UC, 2004 -05 and 2009 -10

Strategy for change • Regional teams for Pathways and Transitions Ø Communicate best practices

Strategy for change • Regional teams for Pathways and Transitions Ø Communicate best practices Ø Identify gaps and priorities Ø Commission local action teams Ø May continue to operate after CCPT funding ends • Local teams Ø Develop solutions to challenges identified by regional teams Ø Report back to regional teams Ø Brokering of Work Based Learning and Career Placement • Cross-cutting infrastructure Ø Industry engagement intermediary Ø Data sharing platform: Cal. Pass PLUS

Regional Teams Meet Smaller “design teams” work on issue-areas and bring them back to

Regional Teams Meet Smaller “design teams” work on issue-areas and bring them back to the regional teams Design teams innovate and propose solutions Design teams refine their proposed models and move to implementation October 2 December 4 February 5 Larger region implements design team innovations May 7

Strong Pathways: College & Career Success Health & Biosciences Assessment, Placement & Remediation Engineering

Strong Pathways: College & Career Success Health & Biosciences Assessment, Placement & Remediation Engineering & Advanced Man. ICT & Digital Media Inter-segmental Student Supports Public Service & Law Dual & Concurrent Enrollment practices Industry Engagement Intermediary Platform Data sharing platform: Cal. Pass PLUS

East Bay Career Pathways Project Timeline – Year One Sept October 2 AM: Launch

East Bay Career Pathways Project Timeline – Year One Sept October 2 AM: Launch PM: Regional Pathway Teams: Overview Pathway Dev’t Teams Transition Teams Leadership Teams Data Sharing Team Nov Dec Jan 2015 Feb Mar April May Dec. 4 Regional Pathway Teams: Dual Enrollment Dec. 4 Regional Pathway Teams: WBL May 7 Regional Pathway Teams: Pathway Quality Transition: -Placement -Student Supports Transition: -Student Supports -Placement Transition: --Student Supports -Placement Administrators: Early College Credit Administrators: Work Based Learning & Career Placement Agreements Administrators: Pathway Systems Development (internal) On-gong Data Sharing and Definitions Meetings Bi-weekly Business Meetings: Monthly Business; Monthly Pathway Development Support Working Group PD Transition Teams: Student Supports Placement/ Remediation Local Pathway Work: Leadership Teams: Administrators Eng/Manuf ICT/DM Health Science Public Service June 2015

YEAR ONE Colleges and high schools locally: • Deepen K 12 -college connections •

YEAR ONE Colleges and high schools locally: • Deepen K 12 -college connections • Get more students enrolled by starting/expanding college and career pathways • Improve pathway quality by: • Aligning K-12/college curricula • Increasing and integrating work-based learning and creditbased internships • Transitioning more students to college • Enroll students early (dually/concurrently) • Better remediation, improved academic placement • Improve matriculation, outreach, exposure

YEAR ONE Colleges and high schools regionally: – Learn practices from peers, experts and

YEAR ONE Colleges and high schools regionally: – Learn practices from peers, experts and local teams to begin, improve, expand pathways – Hear and respond to industry needs – Inventory and action planning – Move progressively towards taking action on issues to be addressed regionally (and/or sub-regionally/locally) – Learning Communities

Distributive Leadership R-PAT Working Group

Distributive Leadership R-PAT Working Group

You Student Support Services Key Action * Develop early college experiences for students *

You Student Support Services Key Action * Develop early college experiences for students * Navigate application process CTE Teachers * Develop early credit opportunities for students English & Math Academic Core Teachers, Faculty & Leadership Site Administration Project Goal 100% of HS students complete community college application Students develop Education Plans in high school for Post-Secondary success Increase Work-Based Learning experiences for students Reduction in remediation * Develop Programs of Study * Work collaboratively to develop systems and structures

Student Transitions Post Secondary K-12 High Quality Career Pathways CCSS & CTE Integration, Early

Student Transitions Post Secondary K-12 High Quality Career Pathways CCSS & CTE Integration, Early College Credit Integrated Counseling Improved Academic Placement Better Jobs