Bringing Poetry to Life Melissa Daniels and Alexandra

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Bringing Poetry to Life Melissa Daniels and Alexandra Baines

Bringing Poetry to Life Melissa Daniels and Alexandra Baines

Introduction to Poetry ~ Billy Collins I ask them to take a poem and

Introduction to Poetry ~ Billy Collins I ask them to take a poem and hold it up to the light like a color slide or press an ear against its hive. I say drop a mouse into a poem and watch him probe his way out, or walk inside the poem's room and feel the walls for a light switch. I want them to waterski across the surface of a poem waving at the author's name on the shore. But all they want to do is tie the poem to a chair with rope and torture a confession out of it. They begin beating it with a hose to find out what it really means

What Can Poetry Do? • Be about anything • Tap our senses– make us

What Can Poetry Do? • Be about anything • Tap our senses– make us see, feel, hear, and taste in our imaginations • Make us look at everyday life through new eyes • Tell stories that point to a theme

"You Can't Write a Poem About Mc. Donald's" Ronald Wallace (b. 1945) Noon. Hunger

"You Can't Write a Poem About Mc. Donald's" Ronald Wallace (b. 1945) Noon. Hunger the only thing singing in my belly. I walk through the blossoming cherry trees on the library mall, past the young couples coupling, by the crazy fanatic screaming doom and salvation at a sensation-hungry crowd, to the Lake Street Mc. Donald's. It is crowded, the lines long and sluggish. I wait in the greasy air. All around me people are eating— the sizzle of conversation, the salty odor of sweat, the warm flesh pressing out of hip huggers and halter tops. When I finally reach the cash register, the counter girl is crisp as a pickle, her fingers thin as french fries, her face brown as a bun. Suddenly I understand cannibalism. As I reach for her, she breaks into pieces wrapped neat and packaged for take-out. I'm thinking, how amazing it is to live in this country, how easy it is to be filled. We leave together, her warm aroma close at my side. I walk back through the cherry trees blossoming up into pies, the young couples frying in the hot, oily sun, the crowd eating up the fanatic, singing, my ear, eye, and tongue fat with the wonder of this hungry world. This poem illustrates: • A poem can address any subject • Sensory language: images, descriptions, and comparisons readers can see feel, taste and smell • Similes: compare people to food • Theme: How easy it is to be filled

Bang Ro Tapia Slide the clip in. Clear your mind and watch the image

Bang Ro Tapia Slide the clip in. Clear your mind and watch the image sharpen. A silhouetted figure with an X in the center. Exhale and block out the chill. Hold your breath and your senses go numb. Forget the kick, and let the bullet surprise you. Then slowly ease down on the trigger. Finally it stops, Then gives. Bang

Maybe Dats Youwr Pwoblem Too by Jim Hall All my pwoblems who knows, maybe

Maybe Dats Youwr Pwoblem Too by Jim Hall All my pwoblems who knows, maybe evwybody's pwoblems is due to da fact, due to da awful twuth dat I am SPIDERMAN. I know. All da dumb jokes: No flies on you, ha ha, and da ones about what do I do wit all doze extwa legs in bed. Well, dat's funny yeah. But you twy being SPIDERMAN for a month or two. Go ahead. You get doze cwazy calls fwom da Gubbener askin you to twap some booglar who's only twying to wip off color T. V. sets. Now, what do I cawre about T. V. sets? But I pull on da suit, da stinkin suit, wit da sucker cups on da fingers, and get my wopes and wittle bundle of equipment and den I go flying like cwazy acwoss da town fwom woof top to woof top. Till der he is. Some poor dumb color T. V. slob and I fall on him and we westle a widdle until I get him all woped. So big deal. You tink when you SPIDERMAN der's sometin big going to happen to you. Well, I tell you what. It don't happen dat way. Nuttin happens. Gubbener calls, I go. Bwing him to powice, Gubbener calls again, like dat over and over. I tink I twy sometin diffunt. I tink I twy sometin excitin like wacing cawrs. Sometin to make my heart beat at a difwent wate. But den you just can't quit being sometin like SPIDERMAN. You SPIDERMAN for life. Fowever. I can't even buin my suit. It won't buin. It's fwame wesistent. So maybe dat's youwr pwoblem too, who knows. Maybe dat's da whole pwoblem wif evwytin. Nobody can buin der suits, dey all fwame wesistent. Who knows? This poem illustrates: • Poetry is meant to be read aloud • Repetition can create a cadence or rhythm • Theme: Each of us is who we are • Persona Poem: an imagined speaker…Spiderman with a lisp.

Lady Liberty By Hawkens Bory-Baar Bound in steel braces, a flickering torch in my

Lady Liberty By Hawkens Bory-Baar Bound in steel braces, a flickering torch in my hand, my feet are planted on the ground, my arm fixed in a ridiculous pose. My body clad in copper green and scarred with age. Why should I, a symbol of freedom be unable to leave? Every day, people look up at me. A giant, a colossus On a deserted island, I know nothing else, surrounded by water, I serve no other purpose. people come from all over the world to stand at my feet. For over a century I’ve stared over the horizon, ever vigilant, always watching. So how did I ever manage, to get that name? The Statue of Liberty, how ironic.

 Poetry Writing Process How do you kick start a reluctant poet?

Poetry Writing Process How do you kick start a reluctant poet?

Brainstorm Any ideas? Model how to write a poem from a list of 10

Brainstorm Any ideas? Model how to write a poem from a list of 10 words

Pre writing Develop a word bank……… how? MORNINGS (that’s my idea!) Select key words

Pre writing Develop a word bank……… how? MORNINGS (that’s my idea!) Select key words that you associate with your poem idea ALARM CLOCK DAWN EYES SHEETS BED SHOWER COFFEE YAWN MIRROR DAUGHTER MOOD

Pre writing – develop a word bank……… continued MORNINGS – now add any word

Pre writing – develop a word bank……… continued MORNINGS – now add any word that you associate with your key words ALARM CLOCK DAWN EYES SHEETS BED SHOWER COFFEE YAWN MIRROR DAUGHTER MOOD ringing, beeping, interrupting, shock light, grey, sun, fresh tired, closed, unfocused, puffy messy, thrown back, linen, crisp warm, comfy, inviting water, hot, scalding, steam, soap, wake-up boil, mug, kettle, bitter, zap, sugar mouth, stretch, rub, eyes water foggy, avoid, wipe, unkind barefoot, sleepy, bear, chocolate milk grumble, grumpy, complain, silence

D 1 – hand written Morning The shocking beep of the interrupting alarm Ringing

D 1 – hand written Morning The shocking beep of the interrupting alarm Ringing in the grey light of dawn Tired eyes, puffy and unfocused, fight against closing Thrown back sheets lie messily on the bed’s inviting warmth The shower’s scalding, soapy, steam startles awake Aided by the bitter zap of the sugary coffee Yawning, mouth stretched wide The mirror’s foggy story is unkind Small bare-feet with teddy in tow Arrive to break the moody silence with sleepy chatter

D 5 – Final Monday Morning The berating beep of the interrupting alarm Ringing

D 5 – Final Monday Morning The berating beep of the interrupting alarm Ringing in the grey light of dawn Tired, puffy eyes, unfocused as a newborn Flutter as they fight against closing Thrown back sheets beckon to the bed’s inviting warmth The shower’s scalding, soapy, steam startles awake Aided by the bitter zap of coffee Yawning, mouth stretched to infinity The mirror’s foggy story is unkind Small bare-feet with teddy in tow Arrive to break the moody silence with sleepy chatter Find examples of: Personification Hyperbole Simile Alliteration

Process Review • 1. Brainstorm • • 2. Pre-write part one. List of 6

Process Review • 1. Brainstorm • • 2. Pre-write part one. List of 6 keys words 3. Pre-write part two. Words associated with key words 4. Draft 1 (handwritten) 5. Draft 2 – make changes and check on strategies 6. Draft 3 – Type, include comments on each strategy used 7. Peer Edit and make changes – 8. Draft 4 – Mrs. Baines comments 9. Draft 5 – Final version

Visualization – Poetry Inspired by Art

Visualization – Poetry Inspired by Art

www. youtube. com/watch? v=ox. Hn. Rfh Dmrk&feature=related Starry Night – Vincent Van Gough

www. youtube. com/watch? v=ox. Hn. Rfh Dmrk&feature=related Starry Night – Vincent Van Gough

The benefits of writing poems inspired by art: Great discussions • Teaches ways in

The benefits of writing poems inspired by art: Great discussions • Teaches ways in which poets can approach a piece of artwork • Encourage the use of sensory images • Engages visual learners

The Great Wave By Gustavo Lemos (6 th Grade) The salty great wave Powerful

The Great Wave By Gustavo Lemos (6 th Grade) The salty great wave Powerful to an extreme Sky, an orange sheet Mt. Fuji in the distance Touching the walls of the sea The wet men in boats Fighting the thrashing cold swell The breeze of the air Sprays mist on their scared faces The surf crashes on the deep People yelling loud Frightened by the blue sheet Fearful of drowning Flowing fast with the stream The ocean dances with grace The Great Wave at Kamagawa by Hokusai

… Lady Jane Grey By Jessica Martin (6 th Grade) The thought of the

… Lady Jane Grey By Jessica Martin (6 th Grade) The thought of the axe’s blade gives me fear Salty tears streak my face for death is near Hay is fresh and matting the floor of mud The block of wood is washed with dry blood Wretched wet and white is the blind fold blocking my sight My ladies weep for me; I see the light The silk from my dress I find soothing and comforting The priest at my side is guiding my steps, whispering As seconds go by there is nothing to do but wait Heaven is so close I can imagine the open gates Oh Mary, because of you, horrible death I face I was queen for a day and failed to maintain my place The axe poised ready to fall on my neck, oh how! Salty tears streak my face for death is now Lady Jane Grey by Delaroche

Poetry Workshops • Allow quality discussion about a common piece of literature in a

Poetry Workshops • Allow quality discussion about a common piece of literature in a time-efficient manner • Develop a common vocabulary for talking about literary elements • Support meaningful language learning • Engage reluctant learners • Create a community of critical readers and intentional writers

Resources: Naming the World: A Year of Poems and Lessons by Nancy Atwell Poetry

Resources: Naming the World: A Year of Poems and Lessons by Nancy Atwell Poetry Workshop for Middle School by Michelle Ambrosini and Teresa M. Morretta

Contact details • Melissa. daniels@lincoln. edu. ar • Alexandra. baines@lincoln. edu. ar

Contact details • Melissa. [email protected] edu. ar • Alexandra. [email protected] edu. ar