Blast Theory Theatre and New Media Blast Theory

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Blast Theory Theatre and New Media Blast Theory, left to right: Matt Adams, Nick

Blast Theory Theatre and New Media Blast Theory, left to right: Matt Adams, Nick Tandavanitj, Ju Farr http: //www. cacsa. org. au/cvap/2004/1_BS 33_1/Mitchell_p 44. html Blast Theory

About Blast Theory l l l l Led by Matt Adams, Ju Row Farr,

About Blast Theory l l l l Led by Matt Adams, Ju Row Farr, and Nick Tandavanitj, the group has a team of seven and is based in London. The group's work explores interactivity and the relationship between real and virtual spaces with a particular focus on the social and political aspects of technology. The group confronts a media-saturated world in which popular culture rules. Blast Theory asks questions about the ideologies present in the information that envelops us. Collaborates with the Mixed Reality Lab, University of Nottingham Mixing audiences across the internet, live performance and digital broadcasting, Blast Theory aims to create groundbreaking new forms of performance and interactive art. “Their practice speaks to a media-wise generation in its content and message. Whatever the tools applied, they always create a compelling environment of danger and thrill. ” BE Magazine, Germany Blast Theory

Chronology These are only some of Blast Theory’s work: l l l l 1991

Chronology These are only some of Blast Theory’s work: l l l l 1991 Gunmen Kill Three 1992 Chemical Wedding 1994 Stampede 1998 Kidnap 1999 Route 12: 36 2000 Desert Rain 2000 Choreographic Cops in a Complicated World 2001 An Explicit Volume 2001 Can You See Me Now? 2001 Viewfinder 2002 TRUCOLD 2003 Uncle Roy All Around You 2004 I Like Frank 2004 Light Square Blast Theory

Kidnap Have you ever wanted to be on your own for a while? Have

Kidnap Have you ever wanted to be on your own for a while? Have you ever wanted to leave everything behind for a few days? Ever wanted to get away from it all? l l l On 15 th of July 1998 Blast Theory kidnapped two members of the public chosen from a hitlist of entrants who had registered their willingness to be kidnapped. One month before the Kidnap, 10 entrants were selected at random and put under surveillance. The people did not know they were on the list and they did not know when they would be taken. The final two people were selected at random and kidnapped. The two ‘winners’ were held for 48 hours at a secret location Kidnapping of one of the winners and were not harmed in any way. Winners were not allowed to bring anything and were returned to the place where they were snatched. Winners could walk away at any time by saying the safe word. By entering, the entrants (who were not selected) had access to the kidnap centers, limited edition video of the kidnappings, and 48 hours at the safehouse. They could also email the kidnappers and control the mobile camera at the safehouse to observe the two ‘winners. ’ Winners in the safehouse Blast Theory http: //www. blasttheory. co. uk/bt/mov_kn. swf http: //www. blasttheory. co. uk/kidnap/index. html

Desert Rain l l l Desert Rain used a combination of virtual reality, installation

Desert Rain l l l Desert Rain used a combination of virtual reality, installation and performance to problematise the boundary between the real and the virtual. It was a performance placing participants in a collaborative virtual environment and sending them on a mission into a virtual world. Desert Rain was a collaboration between Blast Theory and the Computer Research Group at Nottingham University. It was a game, an installation, and a performance. Conceptual Background: influenced by Jean Baudrillard's assertion that the Gulf War did not take place because it was in fact a virtual event. The role of the cinema, particularly Hollywood, in this process is also important. Blast Theory http: //www. blasttheory. co. uk/bt/mov_dr. swf http: //www. blasttheory. co. uk/bt/work_desertrain. html

Can You See Me Now? l l l Can You See Me Now is

Can You See Me Now? l l l Can You See Me Now is a game that happens simultaneously online and on the streets. Tracked by satellites, Blast Theory's runners appear online next to the online player on a map of the city. Blast Theory runners use handheld computers showing the positions of online players whom they have to track down. Some of the places where this game has been played: Sheffield (UK), Rotterdam (UK), Oldenburg (UK), Köln (Germany), Tokyo (Japan). The last one was in Cambridge (UK) in April 2005. Conceptual Background: The piece uses the overlay of a real city and a virtual city to explore ideas of absence and presence. It is an attempt to establish a cultural space on these devices http: //www. blasttheory. co. uk/bt/mov_cy. swf Blast Theory

Can You See Me Now? Sightings Blast Theory http: //www. blasttheory. co. uk/bt/mov_cy. swf

Can You See Me Now? Sightings Blast Theory http: //www. blasttheory. co. uk/bt/mov_cy. swf

Uncle Roy All Around You l l l This is an online game that

Uncle Roy All Around You l l l This is an online game that builds on Can You See Me Now? The game played online in a virtual city and on the streets of an actual city. Online Players and Street Players collaborated to find Uncle Roy's office before being invited to make a year-long commitment to a total stranger. Both online and actual players looked for Uncle Roy at the same time. All players have a time of 60 minutes to find the meeting place. Online players weren’t able to see the street players until one has declared they have found the first meeting place. Once a street player has been seen, online players help the street players find the next spot. Other locations include: an office, a limousine, random places in the city. Blast Theory

Work Cited l l l l l “Blast Theory. ” Adelaide Thinkers in Residence

Work Cited l l l l l “Blast Theory. ” Adelaide Thinkers in Residence – Blast Theory. 6 Oct. 2005 http: //www. thinkers. sa. gov. au/future_media. html “Blast Theory – Can You See Me Now? ” BBC – Arts – Blast Theory. 1 Oct. 2005 http: //www. bbc. co. uk/arts/shootinglive/2002/blasttheory/ “Blast Theory with Desert Rain in Australia. ” British Council Arts. 7 Oct. 2005 http: //www. britishcouncil. org/arts-drama-broadcast-blast-theory-desert-rainaustralia. htm“Can You See Me Now. ” Blast Theory. 6 Oct. 2005 http: //www. blasttheory. co. uk/bt/work_cysmn. html “empac plus i. EAR: Blast Theory. ” Empac Rensselaer. 2004. 9 Oct. 2005. http: //www. empac. rpi. edu/events/2004/blasttheory. html “Desert Rain. ” Blast Theory. 1 Oct. 2005 http: //www. blasttheory. co. uk/bt/work_desertrain. html “Kidnap. ” Blast Theory. 1 Oct. 2005 http: //www. blasttheory. co. uk/bt/work_kidnap. html “Theatre in the Air. ” Digitall Magazine. Winter 2004. 7 Oct. 2005 http: //www. samsung. com/Features/Brand. Campaign/magazinedigitall/2004_winter /heroes_02. htm Wontrop, Laura. “Blast Theory muddles minds. ” Polytechnic Online. 5 Oct. 2005. 9 Oct. 2005. http: //www. poly. rpi. edu/article_view. php 3? view=3549&part=1 “Uncle Roy All Around You. ” Blast Theory. 6 Oct. 2005 http: //www. blasttheory. co. uk/bt/work_uncleroy. html Blast Theory