Bibliographic Record Interpretation and Searching Techniques January 21

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Bibliographic Record Interpretation and Searching Techniques January 21, 2005 Presented by: Paul Cabelli, Bob

Bibliographic Record Interpretation and Searching Techniques January 21, 2005 Presented by: Paul Cabelli, Bob Hosh and Andrew Ruggiero New Brunswick Libraries Collection Services Department revised 2/3/06

Introduction Welcome to our presentation! Today we will be reviewing the basic IRIS bibliographic

Introduction Welcome to our presentation! Today we will be reviewing the basic IRIS bibliographic record, concentrating on tags and fields, identifying certain record formats, and exploring some basic searching techniques. Let’s begin by defining what a bibliographic record represents. Put simply, a bibliographic record is a description of an item. This description can range from exceedingly simple to extremely complex.

We can describe anything, from a tree. . . Name: Oak Tree Height: 30

We can describe anything, from a tree. . . Name: Oak Tree Height: 30 feet Weight: 5 tons

…to a national landmark. . . Name: Eiffel Tower Date of completion: March 31,

…to a national landmark. . . Name: Eiffel Tower Date of completion: March 31, 1889 Age: 115 years Contractor: Gustave Eiffel & Cie Engineers: Maurice Koechlin & Emile Nouguier Architect: Stephen Sauvestre Construction: 1887 to 1889 (2 years, 2 months and 5 days) Composition: 18, 038 pieces, 2, 500, 000 rivets Total weight: 10, 100 tons Height: 324 m (height with flagpole) Coordinates : Latitude : 48º 51' 32" North Longitude : 002º 17' 45" East Numbers of visitors up to December 31, 2004: 216, 476, 171 Number of steps: 1665 Owner: City of Paris

To something we use everyday in our work, such as a book! Title: The

To something we use everyday in our work, such as a book! Title: The Daily Show with Jon Stewart Presents America the Book: A Citizen's Guide to Democracy Inaction Author: Jon Stewart, et al ISBN: 0446532681 Format: Hardcover, 227 pp Pub. Date: September 2004 Publisher: Warner Books, Incorporated

All of the descriptions of the items we’ve just seen can be represented in

All of the descriptions of the items we’ve just seen can be represented in a library’s catalog as distinct bibliographic records.

All bibliographic records on IRIS are described using a standardized format, called a MARC

All bibliographic records on IRIS are described using a standardized format, called a MARC record. MARC stands for a MA chine. Readable Cataloging record. The advantage of using a standardized record is that these records can be shared among many libraries and databases worldwide. It makes cataloging more concise and consistent. The basic components of the MARC record are: Tags Indicators Fields Tag – A three digit number that identifies the field-- the kind of data -- that follows. All tags are displayed in ascending numerical order. Indicator - Supplies information about the field for indexing, card production or other system functions (Indicators are not discussed any further in this presentation. ) Field – Where the bibliographic information is stored.

Some of the more commonly encountered IRIS tags and fields that you will find

Some of the more commonly encountered IRIS tags and fields that you will find most useful in your work are described in the following pages. As we begin, lets first take a look at a couple of different view options available to us in Workflows: • The “RED BOOK” View - This limited display is what you see when you perform serials receiving. The bibliographic information is identical to what the public views in webcat. • The “ALL” View: This is the default view for Workflows and offers the most complete depiction of the bibliographic record.

Here’s an example of a fully cataloged bibliographic record in the RED BOOK display.

Here’s an example of a fully cataloged bibliographic record in the RED BOOK display. This view displays limited bibliographic information and no MARC tags. It does show the MARC holdings, and also shows all barcoded items (not pictured in this example).

Here’s an example of a fully cataloged bibliographic record in the “ALL” display. This

Here’s an example of a fully cataloged bibliographic record in the “ALL” display. This view shows the entire bibliographic record, including the 3 -digit MARC tags. All of the tags circled below, and many others not shown, are described in the following slides.

020 – INTERNATIONAL STANDARD BOOK NUMBER (ISBN) - for monographs, booksets, annuals The ISBN

020 – INTERNATIONAL STANDARD BOOK NUMBER (ISBN) - for monographs, booksets, annuals The ISBN (International Standard Book Number) is a unique machinereadable identification number, which is specific to the title. The ISBN contains coded information representing place of publication and publisher. ISBN

022 – INTERNATIONAL STANDARD SERIAL NUMBER (ISSN) – for serials, periodicals, annuals. A single

022 – INTERNATIONAL STANDARD SERIAL NUMBER (ISSN) – for serials, periodicals, annuals. A single ISSN uniquely identifies a title regardless of language or country in which published, without the burden of a complex bibliographic description. Unlike the ISBN, which contains country and publisher prefixes, the ISSN contains no inherent meaning. ISSN

Some items contain both an ISBN and an ISSN. This situation occurs most commonly

Some items contain both an ISBN and an ISSN. This situation occurs most commonly with books in a series and with annuals or biennials. The ISBN identifies the individual book in a series or a specific year for an annual or biennial. The ISSN identifies the ongoing series, or the ongoing annual or biennial serial. In the example below, each volume of Methods in Enzymology is cataloged separately, so each has its own bibliographic record. • ISBN for volume • Title of volume • ISSN of overall series

Another example: Below left is our IRIS serial record for the Statesman’s Year-Book. It

Another example: Below left is our IRIS serial record for the Statesman’s Year-Book. It contains the ISSN. Below right is the copyright (verso) page of the 2004 edition, containing both the ISSN for the general series, and the ISBN for the particular edition (2004) of this series.

050 – LIBRARY OF CONGRESS CALL NUMBER Most academic and research libraries use a

050 – LIBRARY OF CONGRESS CALL NUMBER Most academic and research libraries use a classification system that utilizes Library of Congress (LC) call numbers. This is the classification system used in RUL for most material. The call number consists of a combination of letters and numbers based on subject headings and author information. LC Call Number

086 – GOVERNMENT DOCUMENTS CLASSIFICATION NUMBER(SUDOC or GPO call number) Collections of U. S.

086 – GOVERNMENT DOCUMENTS CLASSIFICATION NUMBER(SUDOC or GPO call number) Collections of U. S. government publications are generally shelved according to a classification system developed by the U. S. Superintendent of Documents. Like LC call numbers, a Su. Doc number is composed of a combination of letters and numbers. However the punctuation and spacing are somewhat different. The beginning letters of a Su. Doc call number stand for the name of the issuing government agency. Su. Doc Number

100 – PERSONAL AUTHOR The 100 tag contains a work’s personal author, editor, or

100 – PERSONAL AUTHOR The 100 tag contains a work’s personal author, editor, or compiler. It may include the dates of this person’s birth and death. This tag is usually seen in monographic records. Personal Author

110 –CORPORATE AUTHOR Field 110 contains a work’s corporate, committee, commission or agency name.

110 –CORPORATE AUTHOR Field 110 contains a work’s corporate, committee, commission or agency name. According to various cataloging rules, a corporate author name is assigned to works that represent the collective thought of an issuing body. This tag may appear in either monograph or serial records. Note: If the item in hand shows a different agency name than the agency listed in the 110 tag it may indicate a possible title change. Corporate Author

245 – TITLE The title field contains the bibliographic name associated with the item.

245 – TITLE The title field contains the bibliographic name associated with the item. monograph Title serial

246 – VARYING FORM OF TITLE (variant title) Field 246 contains varying forms of

246 – VARYING FORM OF TITLE (variant title) Field 246 contains varying forms of the title associated with the item. These variant titles are recorded in field 246 only if they differ substantially from the title statement in field 245, or if they contribute to the further identification of the item. Variant Title

260 – PUBLICATION INFORMATION The 260 tag includes important information regarding the details surrounding

260 – PUBLICATION INFORMATION The 260 tag includes important information regarding the details surrounding an item’s publication, including place of publication, publisher and date published. Publication Information

300 – PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION The 300 tag contains an item’s physical description, including details

300 – PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION The 300 tag contains an item’s physical description, including details on pagination, height, and other descriptive information. monograph Physical Description map serial

310 – CURRENT FREQUENCY The 310 tag is used with serial records to display

310 – CURRENT FREQUENCY The 310 tag is used with serial records to display the current frequency in which the serial is published 3 x a year (starting in ’ 83) irregular Current Frequency annual

362 – VOLUME/DATE RANGE Field 362 contains the beginning/ending date(s) of a serial and/or

362 – VOLUME/DATE RANGE Field 362 contains the beginning/ending date(s) of a serial and/or the sequential designations used on each part. Dates to be used in this field are chronological designations that identify individual issues of the serial. Volume/ Date Range

440 – SERIES STATEMENT The series statement links the current record with other titles

440 – SERIES STATEMENT The series statement links the current record with other titles in the same series. Monograph Series Statement Serial

500 –GENERAL NOTE Field 500 is used for general information such as cumulative indexes,

500 –GENERAL NOTE Field 500 is used for general information such as cumulative indexes, name variations of issuing bodies, numbering peculiarities, etc. Some commonly used examples entered and used by the RUL Libraries include: • NBINV – Note added to monographic records by Collection Services staff for retrospective conversion (RECON), circ-on-the-fly, and record enhancement. DBM will remotely harvest and upgrade these records. • SERMARPEN – Note entered by Collection Services staff in brief serial records that we predict will eventually be overlaid by fully cataloged MARCIVE depository records. • NO LONGER DISTRIBUTED TO DEPOSITORY LIBRARIES IN A PHYSICAL FORM – Serials cataloging adds this note to a fully cataloged record when the depository item no longer is distributed to any depository library. This does not mean that the item is no longer published, or that it ceased.

Examples of 500 Notes

Examples of 500 Notes

530 – OTHER FORMS Current practice in the RUL system is for all forms

530 – OTHER FORMS Current practice in the RUL system is for all forms of an item to be represented together on a single bibliographic record. This is an ongoing record merge process, and many titles still have to be converted into a single record. Once merged, the basic, or root record in most cases will be the print format, with 530 notes referring to other published formats. Other Forms

596 – HELD BY Fields 590 -599 are reserved for local use and definitions.

596 – HELD BY Fields 590 -599 are reserved for local use and definitions. For example, the 596 field is used to display any RUL library that has at least one item attached to the bibliographic record.

780 – PRECEEDING ENTRY (Continues) Information concerning the immediate preceding title of a serial

780 – PRECEEDING ENTRY (Continues) Information concerning the immediate preceding title of a serial (chronological relationship). Preceding Entry

785 – SUCCEEDING ENTRY (Continued by) Information concerning the immediate succeeding title of a

785 – SUCCEEDING ENTRY (Continued by) Information concerning the immediate succeeding title of a serial (chronological relationship). Succeeding Entry

Some titles have both a 780 and a 785; i. e. . they succeed

Some titles have both a 780 and a 785; i. e. . they succeed one title and precede another… v. 1 (Jan. /Feb. 1960) - v. 32 (Dec. 1991) Vol. 33, no. 1 (Jan. 1992) - v. 36, no. 10 (Dec. 1995) Vol. 37, no. 1 (1996) - v. 43, no. 1 (Jan. -Feb. 2002) Vol. 43, no. 2 (Mar. 2002) -

856 – ELECTRONIC ACCESS This tag contains information needed to locate and access an

856 – ELECTRONIC ACCESS This tag contains information needed to locate and access an electronic resource on the internet. Since there may be alternate paths for accessing the same electronic data, you may find multiple 856 links on a single bib record. Note: Some 856 links will provide only partial information (such as Table of Contents or Article Abstracts) or an embargo for certain issues. Electronic Access

928 – LOCAL SHELVING NOTE There are three types of 928 notes that Collection

928 – LOCAL SHELVING NOTE There are three types of 928 notes that Collection Services routinely uses: • Transfer note • Cancellation note • Send superseded volume to another unit library note

TRANSFER NOTE This note is added to the bib record when we transfer one

TRANSFER NOTE This note is added to the bib record when we transfer one or more items from one unit library to another. Generally used in weeding and rationalization projects. This note is used with monographs or serials. Transfer Note

CANCELLATION NOTE Cancellation notes are entered whenever a title is cancelled at a unit

CANCELLATION NOTE Cancellation notes are entered whenever a title is cancelled at a unit library. This note is used with serials or booksets. (If a serial is cancelled, an additional cancellation note is normally added to the 852 MARC holdings tag. ) Cancellation Note

SUPERSEDED NOTE Superseded notes are added whenever a situation exists where the previous volume

SUPERSEDED NOTE Superseded notes are added whenever a situation exists where the previous volume of a currently received item is routinely sent to a different library. This note is used with serials. Superseded Note

Now that we have finished discussing the individual tags, we’d like to explore some

Now that we have finished discussing the individual tags, we’d like to explore some issues of general bibliographic interest that may impact your workflow. • Location of Title Change Notes on the IRIS record • How to Find Package and Membership Information • How to Identify a Title Control Number • How to Differentiate Ceased Serial Titles from Current Serial Titles • How to Differentiate a Serial Record from a Monographic Record • How to Differentiate Brief Records from Fully Cataloged Records

Title changes: “Sent to Cat” Notes Bib-Cat staff are responsible for sending title changes

Title changes: “Sent to Cat” Notes Bib-Cat staff are responsible for sending title changes to be cataloged. The staff enters notes in the MARC holdings of both the old and new title indicating which issues have been sent to cataloging. Sent to Cat Note

Package and Membership For packages and memberships, a shadowed brief record is created. The

Package and Membership For packages and memberships, a shadowed brief record is created. The 245 tag contains the title of the package or membership and the 246 tags contain the titles included in the package. The order record for the package is attached to this record; however, controls should not be attached to the record. The individual titles in the 246 tags have their own bibliographic records and each would have controls attached for receiving.

By attaching the 246 tags to the package title it enables you to pull

By attaching the 246 tags to the package title it enables you to pull up the serial title and the package title in the same search. Title Keyword Search for serial Brief Package Title Record Fully Cataloged Serial Title Record Search Results

TITLE CONTROL NUMBERS • A title control number is a unique identifier for each

TITLE CONTROL NUMBERS • A title control number is a unique identifier for each bibliographic record. The number usually begins with the letter “o” (ex. o 54395462), except for brief records which begin with the letter “a” (ex. a 2237109). When a brief record becomes fully cataloged (normally this happens by overlaying an OCLC record onto the brief record), the “a” number is replaced by the “o” number (which is identical to and derived from the OCLC accession number. This “o” number also normally appears in the 035 field of a fully cataloged bib record. • Staff use the title control number to positively identify a title when communicating with each other to resolve record problems.

Title Control Number Example: BRIEF RECORD Title Control Number

Title Control Number Example: BRIEF RECORD Title Control Number

Title Control Number Example: TMP MARCIVE Record Title Control Number

Title Control Number Example: TMP MARCIVE Record Title Control Number

 Title Control Number Example: FULLY CATALOGED RECORD Title Control Number

Title Control Number Example: FULLY CATALOGED RECORD Title Control Number

HOW TO DIFFERENTIATE CEASED SERIAL TITLES FROM CURRENT SERIAL TITLES • Ceased titles (commonly

HOW TO DIFFERENTIATE CEASED SERIAL TITLES FROM CURRENT SERIAL TITLES • Ceased titles (commonly called ‘dead’ titles) can be distinguished from current titles by checking the date type tag in the fixed fields of the bibliographic record. Ceased titles are designated by “d”, and current titles by “c”. The date 2 tag will also have the year that the title ceased. • Ceased titles can also be identified by checking the 260 Publication Information tag or the 362 Volume/Date Range tag. One or both of these tags would have the date (year) the title was last published. Sometimes a 500 Note tag is also used to give the date publication ceased. There may also be a 785 which indicates a succeeding title.

CEASED TITLE EXAMPLE • Date type shows “d” • Date 2 is closed (i.

CEASED TITLE EXAMPLE • Date type shows “d” • Date 2 is closed (i. e. not ‘ 9999’) • Publication Info date is closed • Volume/date range is closed • Continued by another title

Current Title Example • Date Type shows “c” • Date 2 is open •

Current Title Example • Date Type shows “c” • Date 2 is open • Publication Info date is open • Volume/date range is open

How to Differentiate a Serial Record from a Monographic Record • Serials are items

How to Differentiate a Serial Record from a Monographic Record • Serials are items issued in successive parts bearing numerical or chronological designations and intended to be continued indefinitely (e. g. , magazines, journals, series, newspapers). • Monographs are items either complete in one part (monograph) or intended to be completed in a finite number of separate parts (multivolume monographs, or booksets). • Serial records can be distinguished from monograph records by checking the bibliographic level tag in the fixed fields of the bibliographic record. Serials are designated by “s” and monographs by “m”. • Monographic records would contain no 780 Earlier Title or 785 Continued By tags. Serial records also contain a 310 Current Frequency tag and a 362 Volume / Date Range tag and an 022 tag for the ISSN number. • The record format field in the Control tab of the bibliographic record indicates “SERIAL” for a serial record and “MARC” for a monographic record.

Serial Record Example • Control Tab Record Format Shows “Serial” • Fixed Field Bibliographic

Serial Record Example • Control Tab Record Format Shows “Serial” • Fixed Field Bibliographic Level Shows “s” • Record Usually Contains an ISSN • Record Shows a Current Frequency • Record Contains a volume/date range • Record May Contain a Preceding/Succeeding Title

Monographic Record Example single volume publication • Control Tab Record Format Shows “MARC” •

Monographic Record Example single volume publication • Control Tab Record Format Shows “MARC” • Fixed Field Bibliographic Level Shows “m” • Fixed Field Date 2 is Empty • Record Usually Contains an ISBN • Record Usually Contains a Personal Author • Phys Desc Includes Pagination • Publication Date is a Single Year

Monographic Record Example multi-volume set (bookset) Bookset records differ from single-volume monographic records in

Monographic Record Example multi-volume set (bookset) Bookset records differ from single-volume monographic records in a number of ways…

 • Date 2 is either a 9999 (bookset still being published) or an

• Date 2 is either a 9999 (bookset still being published) or an actual date (bookset is complete) • There usually are multiple ISBNs, one for each volume • Publication date has a hyphen (bookset still being published) or has a hyphen with an end date (bookset is complete) • Phys Desc Shows No Pagination • Record usually has a 505 tag, listing the titles of some or all the volumes published to date

 • Each volume will have its own item entry on the holdings record

• Each volume will have its own item entry on the holdings record

How to Differentiate a Brief Record from a Fully Cataloged Record • Brief records

How to Differentiate a Brief Record from a Fully Cataloged Record • Brief records in IRIS have only a limited number of tag entries. Usually only the 245 Title Statement, 260 Publication Information and possibly a 780 Earlier Title or 785 Continued By tags. • Fully cataloged records always contain subject heading 600 tags. • The Date Cataloged field in the Control field of the bibliographic record would be NEVER.

Brief Record Example • date cataloged is NEVER • Bib record is limited to

Brief Record Example • date cataloged is NEVER • Bib record is limited to title and publication information (no subject headings)

Fully Cataloged Record Example • Shows date cataloged • Bib record gives a full

Fully Cataloged Record Example • Shows date cataloged • Bib record gives a full description of the title using numerous MARC tags, including subject headings

Searching The last part of our program will consist of demonstrating how you can

Searching The last part of our program will consist of demonstrating how you can search for some commonly used tags and fields in IRIS. • ISSN • Title Control Number • Multi-Tag Search • Call Number Search (Su. Doc / LC )

ISSN Search: Using the Item Search and Display Icon General Keyword Search Note: When

ISSN Search: Using the Item Search and Display Icon General Keyword Search Note: When Searching for ISSN, it’s necessary to leave in the hyphen. Search Results

ISSN Search: using the search icon Word or Phrase Keyword Search Note: When Searching

ISSN Search: using the search icon Word or Phrase Keyword Search Note: When Searching for ISSN, it’s necessary to leave in the hyphen. Search Results

Title Control Number Search: Using the Item Search and Display Icon Title Control Number

Title Control Number Search: Using the Item Search and Display Icon Title Control Number Exact Search Results

Title Control Number Search: using the search icon Word or Phrase Keyword Search Results

Title Control Number Search: using the search icon Word or Phrase Keyword Search Results

Multi-Tag Search: using the item search & display icon General Multi-Tag Search: use braces

Multi-Tag Search: using the item search & display icon General Multi-Tag Search: use braces { } Preliminary Results: 2 Records Final Search Results

Multi-Tag Search: using the search icon Word/Phrase & Title Multi-Tag Search Preliminary Results: 2

Multi-Tag Search: using the search icon Word/Phrase & Title Multi-Tag Search Preliminary Results: 2 Records Final Search Results

Call Number Search: using the item search & display icon Call Number Browse Search

Call Number Search: using the item search & display icon Call Number Browse Search Preliminary Results Final Search Results: Bib Record Final Search Results: Items

Search Questions 1. Searching by title control number o 01643268, what title do you

Search Questions 1. Searching by title control number o 01643268, what title do you come up with, and what other material formats are indicated on the bib record? 2. What results do you get when you do a binocular search for the title Molecular Pharmaceutics? 3. Under what name was the New York Times published in 1852? And who was the publisher? 4. Using a multi-tag corporate author and title search, how many copies of the report by the Warren Commission on the Kennedy assassination exist is IRIS?

Useful Bibliographic Sources • Understanding MARC Bibliographic http: //www. loc. gov/marc/umb/ • MARC 21

Useful Bibliographic Sources • Understanding MARC Bibliographic http: //www. loc. gov/marc/umb/ • MARC 21 Format for Bibliographic Data http: //www. loc. gov/marc/bibliographic/ecbd home. html