Bell ringer Sheet Glue the Bell Ringer sheet

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Bell ringer Sheet Glue the Bell Ringer sheet into your IAN notebook (Page 36

Bell ringer Sheet Glue the Bell Ringer sheet into your IAN notebook (Page 36 IAN) Complete Mondays Bell Ringer

MYP Unit Question: Can you Hear or See me NOW? Area of Interaction: Health

MYP Unit Question: Can you Hear or See me NOW? Area of Interaction: Health and Social Education Learner Profile: Thinkers Standard: S 8 P 4. Students will EXPLORE the wave nature of sound and electromagnetic radiation. f. Diagram the parts of the wave and explain how the parts are affected by changes in amplitude and pitch. EQ: How does changing the frequency or height of a wave affect its sounds? Learning Target: Today I am learning about the sound waves because they help me to hear (when I want to…). Homework: Study for upcoming quiz on FRIDAY

OPENING- BBC - WAVES

OPENING- BBC - WAVES

Work Session – Foldable!!!

Work Session – Foldable!!!

Label the flaps as follows 1 - Increase wavelength • 2 - Decrease wavelength

Label the flaps as follows 1 - Increase wavelength • 2 - Decrease wavelength • 3 - Increase amplitude • 4 -Decrease wave amplitude

Inside Flap- (write questions) 1 - Describe what happens to the PITCH when we

Inside Flap- (write questions) 1 - Describe what happens to the PITCH when we increase wavelength. 2 - Describe what happens to PITCH when you decrease wavelength 3 - Describe what happens to the sound when you increase AMPLITUDE. 4 - Describe what happens to the sound when you decrease the amplitude

ANSWERS to Inside Flap 1 - The PITCH DECREASES when we increase wavelength. 2

ANSWERS to Inside Flap 1 - The PITCH DECREASES when we increase wavelength. 2 - The PITCH INCREASES when you decrease wavelength 3 - The sound gets LOUDER when you increase amplitude. 4 - The sound gets QUIETER when you decrease the amplitude

The UNKNOW PART OF THE FOLDABLE • Draw a diagram of what each wave

The UNKNOW PART OF THE FOLDABLE • Draw a diagram of what each wave should look like.

Diagrams of !-4 Size of Wavelength Amplitude –SOUND Waves A c B D

Diagrams of !-4 Size of Wavelength Amplitude –SOUND Waves A c B D

Closing- GHOST BUSTERS • The Most Haunted team left their microphones and oscilloscope in

Closing- GHOST BUSTERS • The Most Haunted team left their microphones and oscilloscope in the Haunted House overnight and the following sound waves were recorded during the night. • Can you match the sound waves to the correct ghosts and explain why you think you are correct

Sound Waves Cornell Notes IAN Recall Characteristics: • Sound waves are mechanical waves. •

Sound Waves Cornell Notes IAN Recall Characteristics: • Sound waves are mechanical waves. • Mechanical waves require a medium (something to travel through). • Similar to light waves, sound waves can be reflected (echo).

What makes Sound? 1. Vibration: back and forth motion a. There can not be

What makes Sound? 1. Vibration: back and forth motion a. There can not be sound if there is not any vibration b. Most vibrations are too fast for you to see. c. Vibrations require energy —sound is a form of energy.

How does Sound Travel? 2. When something vibrates molecules in the air crowd together,

How does Sound Travel? 2. When something vibrates molecules in the air crowd together, then spread apart, causing sound waves to travel away from the vibrating object

What Forms of Matter can Sound Travel Through? 1. Gas: sound travels easily through

What Forms of Matter can Sound Travel Through? 1. Gas: sound travels easily through gases a. It travels about 1, 129 feet per second through air. (That’s how fast it travels when you talk!) 2. Liquids: Sound travels through water about 4, 794 feet per second. (Think of what ripples look like in the water and how they spread. ) 3. Solids: Sound travels through a solid like wood at a rate of 12, 620 feet per second. Sound travels fastest through solids! 4. Sound cannot travel through a vacuum (a space that is “empty” of matter).

Pitch 1. Pitch: How high or low a sound is a. The higher the

Pitch 1. Pitch: How high or low a sound is a. The higher the pitch the more “squeezed” together the waves are b. The higher the pitch the higher the frequency c. The lower the pitch the lower the frequency

What is Frequency Again Mrs. Ellis? ? ? • Frequency describes the number of

What is Frequency Again Mrs. Ellis? ? ? • Frequency describes the number of waves that pass a fixed place in a given amount of time.

Amplitude and Loudness • Loudness: How much energy a sound wave carries. • The

Amplitude and Loudness • Loudness: How much energy a sound wave carries. • The louder the sound, the higher the amplitude.

Sound Waves IAN # 42 • How will the sound be affected by changes

Sound Waves IAN # 42 • How will the sound be affected by changes in wavelength and amplitude? • Make a data table. Predict, watch and listen. • Record observations. Change Predict Observed Decrease wavelength Increase amplitude

Closing- Summary • Begin with: Sound waves are mechanical waves and require… • Use

Closing- Summary • Begin with: Sound waves are mechanical waves and require… • Use complete sentences (minimum of 4). • Include all key terms (mechanical, medium, frequency, pitch, amplitude, loudness).

High Pitch Sounds • Mosquito Ringtones and Dog Whistles! • Different animals can hear

High Pitch Sounds • Mosquito Ringtones and Dog Whistles! • Different animals can hear high pitch sounds that humans cannot. • Young people can hear higher pitch sounds more than old folks.

Sound Reflection and Absorption A. Reflected sound is called an echo. 1. The vibrations

Sound Reflection and Absorption A. Reflected sound is called an echo. 1. The vibrations are reflecting back to you. B. Soft, air-filled objects absorb sound. 1. When sound is absorbed, you do not hear it because it is not reflected back to you.

1. Sound Waves A. Sound vibrations occur in waves that go out in every

1. Sound Waves A. Sound vibrations occur in waves that go out in every direction like a circle. 1. Sound waves are created by repeated patterns of molecules spreading apart and squeezing together.

B. Sound Waves have 3 common features: 1. They: a. Have a set wavelength

B. Sound Waves have 3 common features: 1. They: a. Have a set wavelength b. Vibrate at different speeds --Frequency: the number of complete wavelengths, or times an object vibrates per second. c. Carry Energy --amplitude is the amount of energy a wave has --high amplitude sound is made by objects with great vibrating motion

Making and Hearing Sounds 1. Hearing Sound a. Humans have two ears on opposite

Making and Hearing Sounds 1. Hearing Sound a. Humans have two ears on opposite sides of their heads. Each ear gathers sound waves on each side of your body. b. There are two ways that humans hear sounds. • With your ears. • With your brain.

1. Sound causes your eardrum to vibrate. The eardrum vibrates differently for each How

1. Sound causes your eardrum to vibrate. The eardrum vibrates differently for each How do you hear sound? sound. 2. The bones of your ear begin to vibrate, beginning with the hammer, moves to the anvil, and finally the stirrup. 3. The sound energy passes to the inner ear. This causes the fluid in the cochlea to move. 4. The nerves then carry the message to the brain. 5. Your brain then tells you what the sound is.

2. Making Sound • All sounds are made by vibrations. • Humans make sound

2. Making Sound • All sounds are made by vibrations. • Humans make sound waves by using their voice. • The human voice is also made by vibrations. • The source of sound in humans is the vocal cords. • Vocal cords — 2 thin, elastic, bands of tissue that vibrate to produce sound.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. How do the vocal cords produce sound? Air from

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. How do the vocal cords produce sound? Air from the lungs flows through the windpipe and into the voice box (where the vocal cords are). Then the air pushes the vocal cords apart making them vibrate. The vibrations create a series of sound waves that exit through your mouth. The change of shape of the vocal cords changes the sound and its pitch. If you can’t talk because of a cold or laryngitis, it is because your vocal cords are swollen and inflamed.

Communication tools that use sound • Voice – allows you to communicate with others.

Communication tools that use sound • Voice – allows you to communicate with others. • Morse Code – code for numbers and letters using sound • Sonar – a device that sends sound waves through water to measure or find something. • Animal sounds • Musical instruments