Basics of Knowledge Translation John R Walker Ph

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Basics of Knowledge Translation John R. Walker, Ph. D. Department of Clinical Health Psychology

Basics of Knowledge Translation John R. Walker, Ph. D. Department of Clinical Health Psychology

Funding Organizations • Canadian Institute of Health Research • Mental Health Commission of Canada

Funding Organizations • Canadian Institute of Health Research • Mental Health Commission of Canada

About you?

About you?

About me?

About me?

What have you heard about knowledge translation?

What have you heard about knowledge translation?

Why is knowledge translation important?

Why is knowledge translation important?

Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) definition Knowledge translation • "a dynamic and iterative

Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) definition Knowledge translation • "a dynamic and iterative process that includes synthesis, dissemination, exchange and ethically sound application of knowledge to improve the health of Canadians, provide more effective health services and products and strengthen the health care system. "

Two approaches to knowledge translation (CIHR) • Post grant knowledge translation • Integrated knowledge

Two approaches to knowledge translation (CIHR) • Post grant knowledge translation • Integrated knowledge translation – potential knowledge users are engaged throughout the research process. – produces findings that are more likely to be directly relevant to and used by knowledge users. – incorporate a dissemination plan to share the results of the project with other interested knowledge users

Knowledge translation Research Findings Service Provider Knowledge Translation Consumer (Young Adults)

Knowledge translation Research Findings Service Provider Knowledge Translation Consumer (Young Adults)

Knowledge Translation Definition • • • Getting the right information To the right people

Knowledge Translation Definition • • • Getting the right information To the right people At the right time In the right format To inform decision making

Key Tasks In Knowledge Translation 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. What information do people

Key Tasks In Knowledge Translation 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. What information do people want and need? Identify what is available currently? Find the information (knowledge synthesis) Put the information into plain language Format the information for different media and different audiences 6. Decide how to effectively disseminate the information

1. What information do people want and need? Qualitative research • Individual interviews –

1. What information do people want and need? Qualitative research • Individual interviews – helps you understand what is important but also concerns, misconceptions, priorities • Focus groups Quantitative research – allows you to reach larger numbers and compare characteristics

2. What is available currently? • Studies of web-based information. – Most resources answer

2. What is available currently? • Studies of web-based information. – Most resources answer the simple questions – describe the problem, describe the treatment – Many questions that are important to consumers are not answered – Do not provide quantitative information that would be helpful in making decisions involving comparisons – Do not deal with difficult areas – risks of treatment, frequency of side effects

Step 3: Find the information to answer consumer questions – knowledge synthesis Challenges •

Step 3: Find the information to answer consumer questions – knowledge synthesis Challenges • The information is technical in nature • Putting the information in quantitative terms – for example, 6 of 10 people are much improved after treatment • There is limited information available to answer many of the questions. There is little support for research to answer the hard questions • We provide references so the reader can check the sources of information

Step 4: Put the information in plain language • Check the reading level of

Step 4: Put the information in plain language • Check the reading level of the information • Reviewed the information with young adults who had experienced problems with depression – they provided feedback and advice • Reviewed the information with professionals providing treatment for depression

Step 5: Format the information for different media and audiences • Some people prefer

Step 5: Format the information for different media and audiences • Some people prefer information on the web – advantage – can provide a great deal of detail and the reader can look at what interests them and skip what does not interest them • Others prefer information in traditional brochure format • Too much information for one brochure – break into brochures that answer questions

Step 6: Disseminate the information widely • Working to link the website with organizations

Step 6: Disseminate the information widely • Working to link the website with organizations serving the public: consumer organizations, professional associations, universities • Brochures: Making them freely available to the organizations about and any person who wants to use them – Creative Commons Copyright allows the user to reproduce them • Evaluating results of dissemination • PLEASE TAKE A LOOK AND SHARE THE RESOURCES

Treatment choices about depression as an example

Treatment choices about depression as an example

Web and brochure formats • www. depression. informedchoices. ca • Brochures are available in

Web and brochure formats • www. depression. informedchoices. ca • Brochures are available in the resources section of the website

A similar approach can be applied to many health problems 1. 2. 3. 4.

A similar approach can be applied to many health problems 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. What information do people want and need? What is available currently? Find the information (knowledge synthesis) Put the information into plain language Format the information for different media and different audiences 6. Decide how to effectively disseminate the information

Thank you!

Thank you!

Knowledge to action cycle (Ian Graham)

Knowledge to action cycle (Ian Graham)