Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy Presentation

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Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy Presentation to Subaru Users Committee

Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy Presentation to Subaru Users Committee

What is AURA? • AURA is a consortium of universities founded in 1957 •

What is AURA? • AURA is a consortium of universities founded in 1957 • The mission of AURA is to establish and operate public observatories • AURA membership now includes 33 U. S. institutions and 7 international institutions. • AURA now manages four major observatories – – National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO) National Solar Observatory (NSO) Space Telescope Science Institute (STSc. I) Gemini

AURA Growth Beginnings, “have not” universities Increased International Linkages Gemini era AURA takes on

AURA Growth Beginnings, “have not” universities Increased International Linkages Gemini era AURA takes on Hubble Space Telescope AURA becomes Policy voice

AURA Members: International • Universidad de Chile— 1992 • Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile—

AURA Members: International • Universidad de Chile— 1992 • Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile— 1997 • Australian National University— 1999 • Leiden University— 2000 • University of Toronto--2004 • Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias— 2005 • Kiepenheuer-Institut fur Sonnenphysik— 2005

Why Be An AURA Member Role=Voice • Part of a very active network for

Why Be An AURA Member Role=Voice • Part of a very active network for communication and interaction and discussion of major policy issues. • Role in guiding AURA and hence whatever AURA does to affect future directions in astronomy. • Direct role in management of AURA centers through the AURA Board and Management Councils.

Why Does AURA Want International Affiliates? • AURA has always included international participants on

Why Does AURA Want International Affiliates? • AURA has always included international participants on its Board and other governance – At least two of our twelve Board Members must be international • We view international collaborations as one way to meet US community needs. • We believe that international collaborations need to be based on strong ties at the university community level.

Membership Guidelines • We emphasize links at the university level, rather than governmental entities

Membership Guidelines • We emphasize links at the university level, rather than governmental entities per se • Faculty of 5, generate at least a Ph. D per year • Involvement in AURA programs and mission, e. g. – Service on councils, Board – Publications based on use of AURA facilities

Some Current AURA Interests • Large Synoptic Survey Telescope: AURA is a partner, LSST

Some Current AURA Interests • Large Synoptic Survey Telescope: AURA is a partner, LSST site in Chile • Giant Segmented Mirror Telescope: AURA is the overall “Program Manager” to advise NSF on implementation: TMT, GMT, International • Advanced Technology Solar Telescope: AURA is manager and operator • National Virtual Observatory: AURA and AUI will form a joint management corporation • James Webb Space Telescope: AURA will manage science operations

A Brief Look at Japanese Institutions and AURA: NOAO • Over the past 5

A Brief Look at Japanese Institutions and AURA: NOAO • Over the past 5 years (semesters 2003 B 2008 A) we have received 139 proposals with P-Is or Co-Is from Japanese institutions. 50 of these have been successful and gotten time. • Within these 139 proposals, there are 118 different astronomers, from 24 different Japanese institutions.

A Brief Look at Japanese Institutions and AURA: NSO • Traditionally have long term

A Brief Look at Japanese Institutions and AURA: NSO • Traditionally have long term Japanese visiting scientists at NSO • Dunn Solar Telescopes and SOLIS are providing collaborative data for the Hinode mission. • AURA is interested in collaboration on the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope, now in planning.

A Brief Look at Japanese Institutions and AURA: STSc. I • No Japanese PIs

A Brief Look at Japanese Institutions and AURA: STSc. I • No Japanese PIs for HST time. • We would like to include Japanese members on our upcoming Time Allocation Committee

A Brief Look at Japanese Institutions and AURA: Gemini • Collaboration among MK Observatories

A Brief Look at Japanese Institutions and AURA: Gemini • Collaboration among MK Observatories is inherently productive. • 5 nights per semester time exchange • WFMOS is an ideal (but challenging) collaborative project.

Conclusion • We would like to consider a Japanese member institution for AURA •

Conclusion • We would like to consider a Japanese member institution for AURA • For further information go to http: //www. aura-astronomy. org/

Backup

Backup

AURA Governance AURA Board _______ Elected by Member Representatives AURA President Ex Officio Member

AURA Governance AURA Board _______ Elected by Member Representatives AURA President Ex Officio Member Of Board and Councils Observatory Council (Oversees NOAO) Solar Observatory Council (Oversees NSO) Space Telescope Institute Council (Oversees STSc. I) NOAO Visiting Committee NSO Visiting Committee Institute Visiting Committee AURA Oversight Committee for Gemini (Oversees Gemini) ACCORD AURA Coordinating Council of Observatory Research Directors

Member Representatives • Elect Board, elect Management Council slates. • Maintain strong linkage to

Member Representatives • Elect Board, elect Management Council slates. • Maintain strong linkage to academia Broaden AURA’s role and viewpoint • Forum for raising major concerns and policy issues

Membership Guidelines The applicant institution should demonstrate that it has been successful in promoting

Membership Guidelines The applicant institution should demonstrate that it has been successful in promoting astronomy in its own institution as evidenced by the quality, scope, and effectiveness of its astronomy program with these guidelines: a. All Applicants i. A staff of five or more faculty or equivalent; and ii. A research program that, on assessment of its quality and effectiveness, would place the applicant among the ranking of current AURA members. b. Universities i. A graduate program leading to a doctorate in astronomy, astrophysics, or related studies; and ii. An average of one or more doctorates awarded per year over a fiveyear period. c. Other Nonprofit Institutions (e. g. Carnegie Observatory) i. Significant contributions to astronomical research through the operation of facilities or sites or through other means; and ii. Programs to promote astronomy, for example, through public or private education.

Member Guidelines, Cont. The applicant institution should have demonstrated an involvement in AURA's role

Member Guidelines, Cont. The applicant institution should have demonstrated an involvement in AURA's role and mission in astronomy through: a. Publications by faculty or staff, and, if applicable, by students based upon data gathered at AURA facilities; and b. Service by faculty or staff on AURA's Board of Directors or on AURA Centers' advisory or review committees, such as visiting, users, telescope time allocation, etc.

International Members • Up to 20% of AURA membership can be international • International

International Members • Up to 20% of AURA membership can be international • International members serve three year terms up to a total of nine years. • AURA wants to make sure we sample different segments of the community

AURA Members: US • • • • • Boston University— 1993 Caltech— 1972 Carnegie

AURA Members: US • • • • • Boston University— 1993 Caltech— 1972 Carnegie Institution— 1997 Harvard— 1957 Indiana University— 1957 Iowa State— 1992 Johns Hopkins— 1982 MIT— 1981 Michigan State— 1997 Montana State— 2005 New Mexico State U. — 1999 Ohio State U— 1957 Penn State U— 1990 Princeton— 1959 Rutgers U--1999 SUNY-Stonybrook--1986 University of Arizona--1972 • • • • U. Cal Berkeley— 2007 U. Cal Santa Cruz— 1957 University of Chicago— 1957 University of Colorado— 1977 University of Florida— 2002 University of Hawaii— 1978 University of Illinois— 1980 University of Maryland— 1986 University of Michigan— 1957 University of Minnesota— 1995 University of North Carolina— 1995 University of Texas— 1972 University of Virginia— 2003 University of Washington— 1986 University of Wisconsin— 1957 Yale University--1958

AURA Management AURA Board AURA President NOAO NSO STSc. I Gemini (Also reports to

AURA Management AURA Board AURA President NOAO NSO STSc. I Gemini (Also reports to Gemini Board)

AURA Board • All authority flows from the AURA Board • Restructured in 1996

AURA Board • All authority flows from the AURA Board • Restructured in 1996 to ensure a more efficient, conflict-free body. • 12 elected members – At least 4 Member Representatives – 4 not Member Representatives – 2 from non-US institutions • Management Council Chairs • President

Board Responsibilities • Maintains financial authority – Approve budget – Approve proposals – Approve

Board Responsibilities • Maintains financial authority – Approve budget – Approve proposals – Approve contracts • Elects members of Management Councils • Appoints President, Center Directors, and other top managers. • Establishes policy

Management Councils • Dual role of advocating the mission of the AURA Center and

Management Councils • Dual role of advocating the mission of the AURA Center and conducting oversight • Subsidiary body of AURA Board with delegated responsibilities for selecting staff, approving tenure, reviewing program plans, reviewing proposals, etc. • Acquires in depth knowledge of the program • Mix of AURA and non-AURA related members • Acts as a conduit for bringing new ideas to the program

AURA Impact • Major operator of US public observatories and proponent of public astronomy

AURA Impact • Major operator of US public observatories and proponent of public astronomy • Active forum for addressing major policy issues for the community • Strong international linkages and proponent of international collaboration • Enabler of major community activities (e. g. workshops, science working groups, etc. ) • Direct influence on policy process and funding issues with the agencies, OMB, Congress, etc.

Giant Segmented Mirror Telescope • As a result of the SR, AURA (and hence

Giant Segmented Mirror Telescope • As a result of the SR, AURA (and hence Gemini) will not be directly involved in any GSMT project. AURA to act as “National Program Manager” • AURA defines role as: – Providing access to extremely large telescopes during the JWST era, at a sufficient number of nights to meet community needs – Providing direct support for operations that will ensure the efficient and effective use by community observers – Ensuring that supporting facilities (the ensemble of telescopes comprising the US system) make it possible for investigators at all institutions to plan and execute programs on extremely large telescopes.

Nominating Committee • Elected by the Member Representatives at the Annual Meeting. • Consists

Nominating Committee • Elected by the Member Representatives at the Annual Meeting. • Consists of five individuals from Member Institutions. • Prepares slate of candidates for: – Board of Directors – Chair of the Board – Chairs and Members of the Management Councils

Membership Committee • Identifies and recommends new member institutions for corporate membership • Advise

Membership Committee • Identifies and recommends new member institutions for corporate membership • Advise on issues of current membership

Policy and Personnel Committee • Review major policy issues and make recommendations at the

Policy and Personnel Committee • Review major policy issues and make recommendations at the request of the Chair (e. g. tenure policy, diversity, compensation and pay, etc. ) • Approve policy manual changes as needed

Comparable Organizations Organization AURA UCAR AUI URA USRA Business Diversity Four major business units

Comparable Organizations Organization AURA UCAR AUI URA USRA Business Diversity Four major business units Two major business units One major business unit Two major business units 20 business units (varying sizes) Member Institutions 39 (some international) 69 (25 overlapping, some international) 0 (9 Founding Institutions, 6 overlapping) 90 (30 overlapping) 97 (26 overlapping, some international) Governing Board 16 Board Members 20 Trustees 22 Trustees 17 Trustees 14 Trustees ~1000 ~1400 ~450 ~2000 420 ~$160 M $190 M ~$100 M $316 M ? Staff Revenues