Ambiguity Two meanings in Literature and Art Definition

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Ambiguity Two meanings in Literature and Art

Ambiguity Two meanings in Literature and Art

Definition of Ambiguity • The presence of two or more possible meanings in any

Definition of Ambiguity • The presence of two or more possible meanings in any passage. • Deliberately creates confusion by using a word or phrase with two or more meanings in one of the premises of an argument. • Doubtfulness or uncertainty as regards interpretation. • Something of doubtful meaning.

Examples of Ambiguity • "Prostitutes Appeal to Pope" (newspaper headline) • “Union Demands Increased

Examples of Ambiguity • "Prostitutes Appeal to Pope" (newspaper headline) • “Union Demands Increased Unemployment" (newspaper headline) • 'The chicken is ready to eat‘ • 'Tibetan history teacher'

Saxophone Player or Woman’s Face?

Saxophone Player or Woman’s Face?

Woman in the mirror OR skull?

Woman in the mirror OR skull?

Vase or 2 Profiles

Vase or 2 Profiles

Henry James places meaning just out of reach

Henry James places meaning just out of reach

Chapter 1: the governess You should be annotating for: • Characterisation • Setting •

Chapter 1: the governess You should be annotating for: • Characterisation • Setting • A Key Incidents • Literary Technique • Symbolism • Atmosphere • Dialogue • Sentence structure • Punctuation • Imagery etc.

I remember the whole beginning as a succession of flights and drops, a little

I remember the whole beginning as a succession of flights and drops, a little seesaw of the right throbs and the wrong.

Trusting the narrative voice “I had at all events a couple of very bad

Trusting the narrative voice “I had at all events a couple of very bad days – found all my doubts bristle again”. • An unreliable narrator is a first-person narrator that for some reason has a compromised point-of-view. • In all stories with a first-person narrator, the narrator serves as a filter for the events. • What the narrator does not know or observe cannot be explained to the reader. • Usually, however, the reader trusts that the narrator is knowledgeable and truthful enough to give them an accurate representation of the story. • In the case of an unreliable narrator (sometimes called a fallible narrator), the reader has reason not to trust what the narrator is saying.

Why can’t we trust the narrator? An unreliable-narrator has limited capacities because of: 1)

Why can’t we trust the narrator? An unreliable-narrator has limited capacities because of: 1) Tunnel vision -narrator sees only one type of thing. 2) Confused emotions -narrator’s involvement keeps him or her from being an accurate reporter. 3) Naiveté-narrator is incapable of understanding what he or she reports.

Excessive positivity vs foreboding doom

Excessive positivity vs foreboding doom

When studying a text, look for: Word f o s of w s t

When studying a text, look for: Word f o s of w s t n e isdom When m o n your o M r i t e t a c p s i r a l otago g r a i v – a e e h n g R c nist seriou n i a h t – n ask yo s adv Whe es some how ice urself t s h “ i e life “wha real ourself nge lesson t’s repetition a y h here? k & c s t s s a s r t a i n o C h ” t t If a word, phrase, h s onigtragsd? ic”tion Cm nt e v e object or place is n n a i r o r e h t c t a r a A ch as h t a mentioned again and h w s t c i d a r t n co k s a – again– ask yourself e r o f e b t e Tgooungh q n e m o u m e y ” s ? r t y h i o o w “why? ” “ n f l m e s s e Ch o yoaruarcte t M s p o t s rs often n o i t c a k ask themse s e a h – T y r lves que o m e m a stions – ask you e r t a h h g s i m rself “w y h w “ f h l a e this link t does ” s r ? r u e o t y t a to? ” ory m

How gothic is our setting?

How gothic is our setting?

Notes on: • The presentation of the governess – how much about herself does

Notes on: • The presentation of the governess – how much about herself does she reveal? • The setting at Bly – how does James keep to the gothic tradition? How does he break it? • Flora – how does the governess shape the readers’ first impressions? • Mrs Grose – again, how does the governess shape the readers’ first impressions? What hints are there of class snobbery? • Miles – descriptions of him in absentia.