ACADEMIC LISTENING Listening 1 Using Notetaking Symbols Listening

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ACADEMIC LISTENING Listening 1. Using Note-taking Symbols Listening 10. Lecture “Drink your Green Tea”

ACADEMIC LISTENING Listening 1. Using Note-taking Symbols Listening 10. Lecture “Drink your Green Tea” and Abbreviations Listening 2. Note-taking and Representing Relationships Listening 3. Milestones in Technology Listening 4. Cues for Recognizing a Process or Sequence of Event Listening 11. Interview with an Internet Addiction Counselor Listening 12. A Debate: Is “Internet Addiction” a Real Illness? Listening 13. Interview with a Master Water Taster Listening 5. Making a Generalization and Proving Evidence Listening 6. Lecture “How to Deal with Stress” Listening 7. Lecture “Acid Rain” Listening 8. Lecture “Pheromones” Listening 9. Lecture “The Near Side of the Moon” Listening 14. Song “Poison in the Well” Linking Listenings 13 & 14 Listening 15. Boosting Brain Power through Arts Listening 16. Music, Art and the Brain References

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 1. USING NOTE TAKING SYMBOLS AND ABBREVIATIONS Introduction to the topic

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 1. USING NOTE TAKING SYMBOLS AND ABBREVIATIONS Introduction to the topic Symbols can replace words that show relationships. For example, the dash (—) can symbolize the verb "was" or any other form of "to be. “ Example: John F. Kennedy was the 35 th president of the United States. Here are some other symbols that you might use: SYMBOLS Listen and Note You will hear ten short statements. Take notes in as few words as possible. Use note taking symbols and abbreviations where appropriate. When you have finished, compare your notes in small groups. Example: Lecturer: The demand for oil has increased greatly in the past 100 years, so the price has also risen. EXAMPLE NOTES Notes: AUDIO TRANSCRIPT Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 2. NOTE TAKING AND REPRESENTING RELATIONSHIPS Listen and Note You will

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 2. NOTE TAKING AND REPRESENTING RELATIONSHIPS Listen and Note You will hear twelve short statements. Take informative notes in as few words as possible. Use symbols, abbreviations, key words, indentation, and connecting lines where appropriate. When you have finished, compare your notes in small groups. Here are some symbols that you might use: AUDIO SYMBOLS TRANSCRIPT Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 3. MILESTONES IN TECHNOLOGY Listen and Note You will hear a

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 3. MILESTONES IN TECHNOLOGY Listen and Note You will hear a lecture that spans millions of years in technology, highlighting milestone events and their dates. Complete the following CHART with the dates, technological breakthroughs, and locations (if mentioned). Vocabulary Related to Inventions: to discover to design to invent to devise to develop to patent innovation breakthrough AUDIO TRANSCRIPT Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 4. CUES FOR RECOGNIZING A PROCESS OR SEQUENCE OF EVENT Listen

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 4. CUES FOR RECOGNIZING A PROCESS OR SEQUENCE OF EVENT Listen and Note You will hear four lecture excerpts that include descriptions of processes or sequences of events. First, read the information about each excerpt. Then, while listening to the excerpts, take notes in the spaces provided. Example: Excerpt from a lecture by Carl Sagan on global community. 1. Excerpt from a lecture on human development. CHART 1 Vocabulary: EMBRYO: an organism in the earliest stages of development, before it becomes a fetus BLOOD VESSELS: veins through which blood flows 2. Excerpt from a lecture on the spread of the plague. CHART 2 Vocabulary: PLAGUE: a deadly disease that spreads quickly EPIDEMIC: many cases of a disease that spreads quickly PANDEMIC: an epidemic spread over a very wide area OUTBREAK: a sudden appearance of a disease MEDIEVAL TIMES: A. D. 1000 1500, the Middle Ages 3. Excerpt from a lecture on library research. CHART 3 4. Excerpt from a lecture on social psychology. CHART 4 Vocabulary: NORM: an accepted or expected standard of behavior or thinking among a given group of people AUDIO TRANSCRIPT Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 5. MAKING A GENERALIZATION AND PROVING EVIDENCE Listen and Note You

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 5. MAKING A GENERALIZATION AND PROVING EVIDENCE Listen and Note You will hear three lecture excerpts containing generalizations and evidence. First, read the information about each excerpt. Then, while listening to the excerpts, take notes. . Example: Excerpt from a lecture on how working outside the home affects women. 1. Excerpt from a lecture on memory improving drugs. CHART 1 Vocabulary: MAZE: an enclosed system with many confusing pathways 2. Excerpt from a lecture on language learning. CHART 2 3. Excerpt from a lecture on Asian Pacific immigration to the United States. CHART 3 Vocabulary: HETEROGENEOUS: consisting of different kinds DIALECT: a regional variety of a language AUDIO TRANSCRIPT Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 6. LECTURE “HOW TO DEAL WITH STRESS” Preparing to listen Read

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 6. LECTURE “HOW TO DEAL WITH STRESS” Preparing to listen Read the following summaries before the lecture begins. Then, listen to the lecture once without taking notes. After listening, circle the letter of the summary that most closely describes the lecture. a. The lecturer primarily compares the two types of stress: negative stress and positive stress. Then, the lecturer lists ways to deal with negative stress. b. The lecturer primarily talks about the health hazards associated with stress and lists the reasons why people should avoid stress. c. The lecturer defines stress and talks about two types of stress. Then, the lecturer focuses on the main part of the talk, which involves a list of ways that one can deal with stress appropriately. d. The lecturer states that stress is hazardous in itself and then provides evi dence for that generalization. Finally, the lecturer lists ways to eliminate stress from one's life. Organization The lecture primarily demonstrates two organizational plans: defining a term and listing subtopics. The lecturer begins by defining stress, giving a simple definition, and then expanding that definition with additional details. The lecturer then lists five ways to deal with stress appropriately, giving examples or additional details about each way as needed. Defining Vocabulary Note Taking Practice Listen to the lecture a second time. Take notes using the following CHART. The comments in the left margin serve to remind you of the organization of the lecture. AUDIO TRANSCRIPT Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 7. LECTURE “ACID RAIN” Preparing to listen Read the following questions

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 7. LECTURE “ACID RAIN” Preparing to listen Read the following questions before the lecture begins. Then, listen to the lecture once without taking notes. After listening, answer the questions. The lecturer's goal is to tell the audience about ______________________. In order to do this, which of the following does the lecturer do? (Check all correct answers. ) a. b. c. d. e. f. classifies the types of acid rain defines acid rain gives the causes of acid rain gives the effects of acid rain presents solutions to the problem of acid rain compares and contrasts acid rain to other forms of pollution AUDIO ________ ________ TRANSCRIPT Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 8. LECTURE “PHEROMONES” Preparing to listen Read the following questions before

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 8. LECTURE “PHEROMONES” Preparing to listen Read the following questions before the lecture begins. Then, listen to the lecture once without taking notes. While listening, answer the questions. 1. The lecturer's goal is to tell the audience about pheromones. In order to do this, the lecturer (check as many as are correct): a. defines the term pheromone. ___ b. shows the similarities and differences between pheromones and other forms of animal communication. ___ c. classifies the types of pheromones. ___ d. gives examples of different kinds of pheromones. ___ e. describes the chemical makeup of pheromones. ___ 2. Which of the following are characteristics of pheromones? (Check as many as are appropriate. ) a. Pheromones may be detected by the sense of smell or taste. ___ b. Pheromones may be detected by any species nearby. ___ c. Pheromones are very sensitive and only require small amounts to get a response. ___ d. Pheromones may be detected by the sense of touch. ___ e. Pheromones must be produced in great quantities in order to be effective. ___ f. Each particular species is responsive only to its own species' pheromones. ___ g. The pheromones of one species have no effect on members of other species. ___ 3. There are two types of pheromones: primer pheromones and releaser pheromones. How do they differ? 4. How many types of releaser pheromones does the speaker mention? AUDIO ANSWER KEY TRANSCRIPT Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 8. LECTURE “PHEROMONES” Organization The lecture primarily demonstrates three organizational plans:

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 8. LECTURE “PHEROMONES” Organization The lecture primarily demonstrates three organizational plans: defining a term, classifying, and exemplifying. The lecturer defines pheromone by giving a simple definition and then expanding it by adding characteristics of pheromones. The lecturer then classifies pheromones into two types, primer and releaser pheromones, and further classifies releaser pheromones into four types, giving additional definitions and examples for each one. Defining Vocabulary The following words and expressions were used in the lecture that you just heard. You may remember the contexts in which you heard them. You will hear an additional example of each word or expression in a new context. After listening, circle the letter of the definition that most closely matches what you think the word or expression means. Note Taking Practice Listen to the lecture a second time. Take notes using the following CHART. The comments in the left margin serve to remind you of the organization of the lecture. AUDIO ANSWER KEY TRANSCRIPT Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 9. LECTURE “THE NEAR SIDE OF THE MOON” Preparing to listen

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 9. LECTURE “THE NEAR SIDE OF THE MOON” Preparing to listen Read the following questions before the lecture begins. Then, listen to the lecture once without taking notes. While listening, answer the questions. 1. The primary purpose of the lecture is to defines the term pheromone. 2. What are the two major types of surfaces of the near side of the moon? a. ___________ b. ___________ Which major type of surface is characterized as follows? Write a, or b in each of the spaces. fairly smooth ___ dominated by craters ___ made of valleys and basins filled with molten lava ___ contain areas of high concentration of mass (mascon) ___ appear as the lighter and brighter parts of photographs of the moon ___ 3. In addition to discussing the geographic features of the moon (i. e. , land formations) and the issue of water on the moon, the lecturer discusses two other major characteristics of the near side of the moon. What are they? a. ___________ b. ___________ AUDIO ANSWER KEY TRANSCRIPT Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 9. LECTURE “THE NEAR SIDE OF THE MOON” Organization The lecture

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 9. LECTURE “THE NEAR SIDE OF THE MOON” Organization The lecture primarily describes an object by listing different features. While doing this, the lecturer compares and contrasts the moon's surface and the Earth's surfaces, classifies the surface types of the moon, and defines new terms. Defining Vocabulary The following words and expressions were used in the lecture that you just heard. You may remember the contexts in which you heard them. You will hear an additional example of each word or expression in a new context. After listening, circle the letter of the definition that most closely matches what you think the word or expression means. Note Taking Practice Listen to the lecture a second time. Take notes using the following CHART. The comments in the left margin serve to remind you of the organization of the lecture. AUDIO ANSWER KEY TRANSCRIPT Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 10. LECTURE “DRINK YOUR GREEN TEA” Preparing to listen Read the

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 10. LECTURE “DRINK YOUR GREEN TEA” Preparing to listen Read the following sentences before the lecture begins. Then, listen to the lecture once without taking notes. After listening, circle the letters of the sentences that describe what the lecturer does. a. provides evidence to support the idea that “drinking green tea is good for people”. b. provides evidence to support the idea that “drinking green tea is hazardous to one's health ”. c. talks about three different kinds of tea d. talks about four different kinds of tea e. describes the different processes used to manufacture each of the different kinds of tea f. describes the process of brewing a good cup of tea Organization The lecture demonstrates three different organizational plans: describing a process, classifying, and making a generalization and providing evidence for that generalization. The lecturer begins by talking about the different types of tea. Then, the lecturer describes (and occasionally contrasts) the different processes for manu facturing those different types (including discussing the role of fermentation in the process). Finally, the lecturer provides evidence for the idea that "green tea is good for you. ” to ferment: to change chemically when a substance causes complex organic compounds to split into relatively simple substances (e. g. , yeast causes sugar to change to alcohol and carbon dioxide) AUDIO ANSWER KEY TRANSCRIPT Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 10. LECTURE “DRINK YOUR GREEN TEA”” Defining Vocabulary The following words

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 10. LECTURE “DRINK YOUR GREEN TEA”” Defining Vocabulary The following words and expressions were used in the lecture that you just heard. You may remember the contexts in which you heard them. You will hear an additional example of each word or expression in a new context. After listening, circle the letter of the definition that most closely matches what you think the word or expression means. In addition to these words, the lecturer also uses a number of terms for different diseases related to various parts of the body. Check the meanings of the following medical terms: lung cancer, stomach cancer, esophageal cancer (or cancer of the esophagus), cholesterol, tumor, dental cavity. Note Taking Practice Listen to the lecture a second time. Take notes using the following CHART. The comments in the left margin serve to remind you of the organization of the lecture. Review and revise your notes. Add information that you remember. If helpful, consider rewriting your notes. Make the relationship between ideas clear and make important ideas stand out. AUDIO ANSWER KEY TRANSCRIPT Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 11. INTERVIEW WITH AN INTERNET ADDICTION COUNSELOR You will hear an

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 11. INTERVIEW WITH AN INTERNET ADDICTION COUNSELOR You will hear an unrehearsed telephone interview from the radio news broadcast Talk of the Nation: Science Friday. It aired on National Public Radio in the United States. Ira Flatow, the host of the show, interviews psychologist Dr. Jonathan Kandell of the University of Maryland. Kandell counsels students who spend too much time on line. Introducing the Topic Work with a partner. Listen to the first 35 seconds of the interview. Then, on a separate piece of paper, write down three questions that you think Ira Flatow might ask Dr. Kandell, the counselor. Listening for Main Ideas Read the questions. Then listen to Part One of the interview and write short answers to the questions. Do the same for Part Two. Compare your answers with your partner's. PART ONE PART TWO Listening for Details Read the questions. Listen to the entire news report again. Write short answers as you listen. Compare your answers with your partner's. PART ONE AUDIO PART TWO TRANSCRIPT Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 12. A DEBATE: IS “INTERNET ADDICTION” A REAL ILLNESS? Expanding the

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 12. A DEBATE: IS “INTERNET ADDICTION” A REAL ILLNESS? Expanding the Topic Is it really possible to be addicted to the Internet? This is a topic of debate among professional psychologists. At a recent meeting of the National Psychological Association, Dr. Mary Turnbull, a well known psychologist, argued that "Internet addiction" should be labeled as a true psychological disorder. Dr. Fred Banes, a psychiatrist from the University of Kansas, disagreed. He insists that the so called Internet addiction is not a real illness. This debate is important because patients are eligible for certain kinds of treatment as well as payments by insurance companies for such treatment if a condition is termed a clinical illness. Listen to the debate between Dr. Turnbull and Dr. Banes. Then listen again and list their main points in the chart below. Dr. Fred Banes 1. Internet addicts behave like any other obsessive people. Dr. Mary Turnbull 1. Internet addicts experience strong cravings 2. ______________________________________ 3. ______________________________________ 4. _______________________ Working with Words Match the underlined words in the sentences with a similar expression from the list below. Write the corresponding letter in the blank. Then compare your answers with those of a partner. AUDIO TRANSCRIPT Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 13. INTERVIEW WITH A MASTER WATER TASTER Vocabulary for Comprehension Complete

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 13. INTERVIEW WITH A MASTER WATER TASTER Vocabulary for Comprehension Complete the following sentences with an expression from the list below. Use appropriate forms of the words. Introducing the Topic You will hear an interview from the radio news broadcast Weekend Edition: Saturday, aired on National Public Radio in the United States. Susan Stamberg, the host of the show, interviews master water taster Arthur Von Wiesenberger, who runs water tasting events to judge which U. S. city's tap water is the best. A water taster primarily looks for the absence of things. Working with a partner, predict three things you do not want in your drinking water. Then listen to an excerpt from the interview to check your predictions. Listening for Main Ideas Look at the key phrases. Then listen to Part One of the interview. When you hear the key phrases, add information on the blank lines. Do the same for Part Two. Compare your answers with those of a partner. Listening for Details Read the statements. Listen to Part One of the interview again. Complete the statements with information from the tape. Do the same for Part Two. Then compare your answers with those of a partner. PART ONE PART TWO Listening between the Lines Read the questions. Then listen to each of the following excerpts from the interview. Discuss your answers to the questions with a partner. AUDIO TRANSCRIPT Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 14. SONG “POISON IN THE WELL” Expanding the Topic The song

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 14. SONG “POISON IN THE WELL” Expanding the Topic The song "Poison in the Well" is performed by the popular rock 'n' roll group 10, 000 Maniacs. The song was written by Dennis Drew and sung by Natalie Merchant, the former lead singer of 10, 000 Maniacs. PART ONE: Listen to the song. Then listen again to each part and fill in the missing words. Compare your answers with those of a partner. PART TWO: Read the lines from the song. Then circle the expression that best explains the line. PART THREE: Discuss the following questions with a partner. Then share your reactions with the class. 1. "Poison in the Well" is a song that has a political message. What is the message? 2. How do you feel about using music to convey political ideas? 3. Is it an effective form of protest? Explain. AUDIO TRANSCRIPT Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LINKING LISTENINGS 13 & 14 Linking Listenings 13 and 14 In a

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LINKING LISTENINGS 13 & 14 Linking Listenings 13 and 14 In a small group, discuss the following questions. 1. In Listening 13 about water tasting, Arthur Von Wiesenberger's tone is positive and upbeat. In Listening 14, Natalie Merchant's song "Poison in the Well" is serious and alarming. What is your reaction to the two selections and their different tones? 2. If you wanted to raise public awareness of the importance of safe drinking water, which selection would you choose? Why? Who would you select to be your spokesperson: Mr. Von Wiesenberger, or Natalie Merchant? Exploring Language: Specialized Adjectives Professional tasters like Arthur Von Wiesenberger use specialized adjectives to evaluate water, wine, beer, coffee, and other products. Look at this statement from Listening 13: Some people found it to be lively and fresh-tasting; they said it had a good balance. PART ONE: Working with a partner, look at the list of specialized adjectives. Notice the positive (+) and negative ( ) connotation of each word. On the chart that follows, categorize the words according to taste, aroma (smell), clarity, viscosity (density), and carbonation level (CO 2). Some adjectives can be listed in more than one category. PART TWO: In this role play, work with a partner. Choose role A or B for the following situations and read only your role. Working with Words Working with a partner read the opinions of the people interviewed for the news article. Match the highlighted words with the similar expressions in the list that follows the news article and write the appropriate number in the blanks. Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 15. BOOSTING BRAIN POWER THROUGH ARTS Preparing to Listen 1. Listen

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 15. BOOSTING BRAIN POWER THROUGH ARTS Preparing to Listen 1. Listen to the excerpt from a piano sonata by Mozart and discuss the following question. Scientists have discovered that listening to classical music, particularly music composed by Mozart, improves our ability to perform certain tasks. What skills or abilities (for example, drawing pictures) may be helped by listening to such music? Compare your ideas. 2. Work in a small group and discuss your answers to the following questions. a. Think back. Did you have music and art lessons in primary and secondary school? How often? How important were they in the overall school program? Did you like them? Why or why not? b. Outside of school, what other music or art training have you had? c. What role do music and art play in your life today? Introducing the Topic You will hear an interview from the radio news program All Things Considered that airs on National Public Radio in the United States. The interviewer, Michelle Trudeau, says, “Just how music enhances mathe matical skills is unknown. “ Working with a partner, brainstorm some answers to this question: Why do you think music may enhance mathematical skills? Make a brief list. Then listen to a small segment of the interview to check your answers. Listening for Main Ideas Read the questions. Then listen to Part One of the interview and circle the correct answers to the questions (PART ONE). Do the same for PART TWO. Compare your results with those of another student. AUDIO TRANSCRIPT Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 16. MUSIC, ART AND THE BRAIN Expanding the Topic In Listening

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 16. MUSIC, ART AND THE BRAIN Expanding the Topic In Listening One we learned that music enhances mathematical and spatial ability, as well as analytical skills. Michelle Trudeau reported that something neurological may happen in the brain to create this connec tion. In Listening Two, David Alpern and Warren Levinson, hosts of Newsweek on Air, a weekly radio broadcast, interview Sharon Begley, Newsweek magazine's science editor, about the relationship between music and art, and the brain. Listen to Part One of the interview. As you listen, take notes on a separate piece of paper about the ideas and examples expressed. Then rephrase the main idea in your own words. Do the same for Parts Two through Four. Share your summary statements with a partner. PART ONE PART THREE Things a Baby Is Born With Example: beating heart Restate: Basically, Sharon Begley is saying that Warren's and Sharon's Reactions to the Research Restate: In other words, Sharon and Warren feel that ____________________ PART FOUR PART TWO The Relationship between Music and Math Restate: So, in short, ___________ Things to Do with Your Child Restate: In other words, Sharon suggests that ____________________ Linking Listenings 15 and 16 AUDIO TRANSCRIPT Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 1 2. SYMBOLS equal does not equal and is more than

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 1 2. SYMBOLS equal does not equal and is more than is less than money to go up; to increase to go down; to decrease leading to; heading toward therefore; so because inches feet; minutes degree at per approximately; circa since 1929 and earlier century without man; men woman; women for example (repeated words) number that is; in other words percent plus Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 1. EXAMPLE NOTES Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 1. EXAMPLE NOTES Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 3. Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 3. Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 4. EXAMPLE Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 4. EXAMPLE Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 4. CHART 1 Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 4. CHART 1 Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 4. CHART 2 Contents

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ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 4. CHART 3 Contents

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ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 4. CHART 4 Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 4. AUDIO 1. Example 2. Excerpt 1 3. Excerpt 2 4.

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 4. AUDIO 1. Example 2. Excerpt 1 3. Excerpt 2 4. Excerpt 3 5. Excerpt 4 Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 5. EXAMPLE Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 5. EXAMPLE Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 5. CHART 1 Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 5. CHART 1 Contents

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ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 5. CHART 2 Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 5. CHART 3 Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 5. CHART 3 Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 5. AUDIO 1. Example 2. Excerpt 1 3. Excerpt 2 4.

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 5. AUDIO 1. Example 2. Excerpt 1 3. Excerpt 2 4. Excerpt 3 Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 6. DEFINING VOCABULARY The following words and expressions were used in

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 6. DEFINING VOCABULARY The following words and expressions were used in the lecture that you just heard. You may remember the contexts in which you heard them. You will hear an additional example of each word or expression in a new context. After listening, circle the letter of the definition that most closely matches what you think the word or expression means. 1. a. b. c. 2. a. b. c. 3. a. b. c. 4. a. b. c. 5. a. b. c. virtually rarely; almost never the case more or less true in practical terms ideally; as it would be in the ideal world immune unaffected; invulnerable affected; vulnerable sickly; ill to adapt to take for one's own to raise another person's child to adjust for a particular use incentive a stressful position something that motivates a person to act a person who does not have feelings for others hazardous unpleasant unusual dangerous 6. to monitor to protect to check regularly to harm or damage 7. regardless of a. in spite of; without concern about b. because of; due to c. next to; adjacent to 8. out of one's hands a. not in one's interest b. not in one's field of vision c. not in one's power 9. inevitable a. unable to be considered b. unable to be enjoyed c. unable to be avoided or prevented 10. to pace a. to adjust the speed or timing b. to run a long distance competition c. to receive a prize a. b. c. Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 6. NOTE TAKING PRACTICE CHART Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 6. NOTE TAKING PRACTICE CHART Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 8. DEFINING VOCABULARY 1. a. b. c. 2. a. b. c.

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 8. DEFINING VOCABULARY 1. a. b. c. 2. a. b. c. 3. a. b. c. 4. a. b. c. 5. a. b. c. 6. a. b. c. to emit to smell something to send out to take responsibility for to evoke a response to respond (to someone else) to bring out a response (from someone else) to refuse to respond physiological related to biological processes related to the mind related to the science of physics mutually exclusive occurring together not occurring together exchanging basic parts to disperse to separate and move into various directions to commit a crime; to perform an unlawful act to give an order; to command to flee to burn; to burst into flames to live; to reside to run away; to escape 7. a. b. c. 8. a. b. c. 9. a. b. c. 10. a. b. c. 11. a. b. c. 12. d. e. f. stimulant a substance that helps one sleep a substance that temporarily increases physiological activity a substance that one drinks to arouse to scare away to excite to point out the direction terrestrial related to land related to water related to air navigational guide something that produces light something that contains water something that leads one on a particular path to exhaust to increase the use of to use completely to continue the use of insecticide something that produces light something that contains water something that leads one on a particular path Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 8. NOTE TAKING PRACTICE CHART Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 8. NOTE TAKING PRACTICE CHART Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 8. ANSWER KEY TO THE QUESTIONS 1: a, c, d 2:

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 8. ANSWER KEY TO THE QUESTIONS 1: a, c, d 2: a, c, f, g 3: Primer pheromones cause physiological changes and affect the organism's development and later behavior; releaser pheromones produce rapid and reversible responses. 4: four Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 8. ANSWER KEY TO DEFINING VOCABULARY 1. b 2. b 3.

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 8. ANSWER KEY TO DEFINING VOCABULARY 1. b 2. b 3. a 4. b 5. a 6. c 7. b 8. b 9. a 10. c 11. b 12. b 1. 2. 3. 4. to emit: The skunk emitted a smell that was so powerful that everyone had to leave. to evoke a response: Her screams evoked an immediate response from her neighbors; they were at her door in seconds. physiological: That drug causes physiological changes such as an increased heart rate and a tightening of the muscles. mutually exclusive: The two types of pheromones — primer and releaser pheromones — have opposing characteristics. One is reversible and immediate; the other affects later behavior and development. Because of these opposing characteristics, pheromones can never be both at the same time. They are mutually exclusive categories. 5. to disperse: At the scene of the crime, people gathered to watch. The police told the crowd to disperse because they were afraid that someone would get hurt if so many people stayed around. 6. to flee: The house went up in flames and the residents had to flee with only the clothes they were wearing. There wasn't a moment to waste. 7. stimulant: Caffeine in coffee is a stimulant. I wouldn't advise drinking coffee close to bedtime. You'll have a hard time falling asleep. 8. to arouse: Snails emit a pheromone which sexually arouses immature snails. This pheromone ensures mating and thus the continuation of the species. 9. terrestrial: Humans are basically terrestrial creatures, while fish are aquatic. 10. navigational guide: Sailors often use the stars as navigational guides while they are sailing the oceans at night. The position of the stars gives them directional information. 11. to exhaust: Some geologists believe that if we continue with our present use of oil and gas, we may eventually exhaust our supply. 12. insecticide: Insecticides must be powerful enough to kill specific insects. This may be a problem, however, because they may be poisonous to other useful species of insects as well. Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 9. DEFINING VOCABULARY 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. firsthand knowledge

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 9. DEFINING VOCABULARY 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. firsthand knowledge a. something learned through direct experience b. something learned through reading or hearing about another person's experience c. something learned before other information perpetually a. lasting forever b. occurring seasonally c. occurring frequently molten lava a. a volcano b. colored streams of water c. melted rock coming from a break in a planet's surface to dominate a. to exist in large numbers or as a major feature b. to exist in small numbers or as a minor feature c. to not exist at all unanimous a. in complete agreement b. having unknown views c. in complete disagreement to be devoid (of something) a. to have relatively few b. to avoid c. to have none 7. a. b. c. 8. a. b. c. 9. a. b. c. 10. a. b. c. 11. a. b. c. to moderate to make something less extreme to make something warmer to make something colder twilight direct sunlight occurring around noon the period of time during which the sky is lit, but the sun has not yet risen over the horizon the period of time during which the sky is lit, but the sun has already set below the horizon dawn direct sunlight occurring around noon the period of time during which the sky is lit, but the sun has not yet risen over the horizon the period of time during which the sky is lit, but the sun has already below the horizon to attribute to regard as the cause to regard as similar to regard as unrelated slim chance no possibility low probability good possibility Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 9. NOTE TAKING PRACTICE CHART Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 9. NOTE TAKING PRACTICE CHART Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 9. ANSWER KEY TO THE QUESTIONS 1: 2: describe the features

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 9. ANSWER KEY TO THE QUESTIONS 1: 2: describe the features of the near side of the moon a. maria (lowlands) b. highlands; a, b, a, a, b 3: a. temperature b. lightness/darkness Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 9. ANSWER KEY TO DEFINING VOCABULARY 1. a 2. a 3.

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 9. ANSWER KEY TO DEFINING VOCABULARY 1. a 2. a 3. c 4. a 5. a 6. c 7. a 8. c 9. b 10. a 11. b 1. firsthand knowledge: It's usually not enough for a child to be told that fire is hot. The child often needs to learn this firsthand—by going near the flame and feeling heat. This firsthand knowledge stays with the child for a long time because it was experienced directly. 2. perpetually: Certain parts of the world are perpetually frozen. Because the ground water never melts, the area cannot support trees. 3. molten lava: Pictures of a volcanic eruption often show red, yellow, and orange lines coming from the crater. These are actually streams of molten lava, melted rock which is so hot that it burns in theses colors. 4. to dominate: Skyscrapers dominate the New York City skyline. A two story building is very hard to find there. 5. unanimous: The new law passed without a single vote in opposition. The decision was unanimous. 6. to be devoid (of something): Areas in which the ground is perpetually frozen are devoid of trees. Imagine what it's like to look at a landscape without trees. 7. to moderate: The atmosphere moderates the sun's influence on the earth's temperature. Without the atmosphere, there would be great temperature extremes depending on whether the sun was up or down. With the atmosphere, heat can be retained by the earth and thus warm die air even when the sun is down. 8. twilight: The best colors of the sunset are during twilight, the time when the sun is no longer on the horizon but the sky is still lit. 9. dawn: We got up at the crack of dawn. Although we couldn't see the sun yet, the sky was lit up. 10. to attribute: The well known doctor attributed her success to her family's support for her work and education. 11. slim chance: She thought her chances were good to win that scholarship when she applied. However, she found out that there were 10, 000 applicants and only two scholarships. Now, she realizes what a slim chance she has! Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 10. ANSWER KEY TO THE TASK a, c, e Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 10. ANSWER KEY TO THE TASK a, c, e Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 10. DEFINING VOCABULARY 1. to hold in high esteem to dislike

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 10. DEFINING VOCABULARY 1. to hold in high esteem to dislike and disdain to respect and admire greatly to be unavailable or exist in limited quantities steam a. wrinkled clothing b. a small body of water (e. g. , a pond) c. water in the form of a gas to roll a. to prepare something sweet (e. g. , a cake or pie) b. to move a boat through water c. to spread out flat and thin by using a tube shaped object humid a. dry (air or weather) b. hot (air or weather) c. damp (air or weather) to wither a. to become smaller, less colorful, or less fresh b. to smell good c. to grow and produce blossoms 6. a. b. c. 2. 3. 4. 5. 7. a. b. c. 8. a. b. c. 9. a. b. c. 10. a. b. c. incidence disappearance unusual nature rate of occurrence to isolate to keep apart; to separate from others to make animals (especially horses) sick to cool to almost freezing to inhibit to hold back; to prevent to live in a place; to reside to move from one place to another toxicity movement in and around growth of life level of poison stimulant a substance that is heated and drunk a substance that gives energy or encourages activity a substance that decreases energy or discourages activity ted Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 10. NOTE TAKING PRACTICE CHART Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 10. NOTE TAKING PRACTICE CHART Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 10. ANSWER KEY TO DEFINING VOCABULARY 1. b 2. c 3.

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 10. ANSWER KEY TO DEFINING VOCABULARY 1. b 2. c 3. c 4. c 5. a 6. c 7. a 8. a 9. c 10. b 1. to hold in high esteem: Everyone holds that artist's work in very high esteem. The art critics are praising her new show and people are willing to pay quite a bit for her paintings. 2. steam: After my eight hour plane ride, everything in my suitcases was wrinkled. I didn't have an iron, so I turned on the hot water in the shower and closed the bathroom door. I hung all my clothes in the bathroom. In about five minutes, the steam had removed all the wrinkles. 3. to roll: In order to make a good pie crust, take flour, water, and butter and make a dough. Then, use a rolling pin to roll the dough into a thin and even crust. 4. humid: In deserts, the climate is often hot and dry. However, in tropical areas, the climate is often hot and humid. 5. to wither: The roses were beautiful on the first day. However, by the third day, the leaves and some of the petals had withered and fallen off. 6. incidence: The incidence of serious car accidents has increased because of the greater number of cars on the road. 7. to isolate: One of the horses on the ranch seemed very sick, so the rancher isolated it until it got better. He kept it in a separate stable because he didn't want the other animals to get sick. 8. to inhibit: I don't like wearing high heels because they inhibit my ability to move about freely and easily. 9. toxicity: Those chemicals have a high level of toxicity. You should wear a mask when you use them so you don't breathe in poisonous fumes. 10. stimulant: Don't drink coffee before you go to bed. It's a stimulant and will keep you awake. Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 11. LISTENING FOR MAIN IDEAS. PART ONE 1. Often students do

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 11. LISTENING FOR MAIN IDEAS. PART ONE 1. Often students do not realize that they are becoming addicted to the Internet. The radio report mentions other problems students talk about instead. What are these problems? 2. What worries the interviewer about his own surfing on the Net? 3. What is a problem with chat rooms? 4. It is important to examine your feelings when you are not on the Net. What feelings may indicate problems? Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 11. LISTENING FOR MAIN IDEAS. PART TWO 1. Kandell's solution is

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 11. LISTENING FOR MAIN IDEAS. PART TWO 1. Kandell's solution is to offer support groups for students who may be overusing the Internet. In what ways does this therapy help them? 2. What are some of the reasons that it's so easy for certain students to slip into Internet addiction? 3. College students go through a developmental process. What are three aspects of this process? 4. Why might parents prefer Internet addiction to other addictions? 5. What aspect of Internet addiction makes it worse than other addictions? Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 11. LISTENING FOR DETAILS. PART ONE 1. What are some other

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 11. LISTENING FOR DETAILS. PART ONE 1. What are some other addictions mentioned by Ira Flatow? 2. Why is Internet addiction becoming more common? 3. Do college students usually tell a counselor if their friends are Internet addicts? 4. Is the exact amount of time someone spends on the Internet an important factor in determining Internet addiction? 5. Kandell says that Internet addiction becomes harmful when it begins to affect other areas of a person's life. What three areas does he mention? 6. What does Kandell suggest that students use to remind themselves to get off line and take a walk? Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 11. LISTENING FOR DETAILS. PART TWO 1. What do the support

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 11. LISTENING FOR DETAILS. PART TWO 1. What do the support group members examine during the sessions? 2. What are the results of the University of Minnesota study? 3. Why is communication over the Net a more comfortable way of dealing with people? 4. What are the indirect physical effects of Internet addiction? Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 11. AUDIO 1. Introduction 2. Part 1 3. Part 2 4.

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 11. AUDIO 1. Introduction 2. Part 1 3. Part 2 4. Excerpt 1 5. Excerpt 2 6. Excerpt 3 7. Excerpt 4 Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 12. WORKING WITH WORDS a. b. c. d. e. f. g.

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 12. WORKING WITH WORDS a. b. c. d. e. f. g. h. ability to control one's desires harmful reduce of total interest stopped communicating with became (something different) identified a person to the police or authority enjoyed something so much that you want to do it as much as possible i. appears j. has an extremely strong phys ical desire for k. uncomfortable physical symp toms while giving up an addiction l. get so involved that you forget what time it is m. all at once n. stop doing something (even though you don't want to) 1. She's obsessed with adventure films. She has to see every new one as soon as it comes out. 2. She noticed her colleague was sharing company secrets with a competitor, so she turned him in. His boss fired him immediately. 3. She was so thrilled at winning $2, 000 playing "pachinko, " a Japanese pinball slot machine game, that she turned into a real pachinkoholic. 4. Although he quit smoking two months ago, he still craves a cigarette after each meal. 5. He got hooked on golf when he moved to Florida. He loves the game so much that he misses work twice a week to play golf. 6. Instead of reducing the number of cigarettes gradually, the smoker simply quit cold turkey. 7. Netaholics spend hours and hours without realizing how long they've been on line. It's easy to lose track of the time when you are surfing the Net. 8. She has tried several diets but hasn't lost any weight because she has no willpower. 9. Because she had spent the last ten years backpacking around the world, the "travelholic" became cut off from her family and friends back home. 10. She couldn't give up coffee completely, so she decided to cut down on the number of cups she drank each day. 11. When she started winning hundreds of dollars at the slot machines, it became impossible for her to drag herself away. 12. After he gave up cigarettes, withdrawal was very uncomfortable. He felt hungry and irritable for weeks. 13. The movie director and producer Steven Spielberg is a well known workaholic. He readily admits that his passion for work is all consuming. 14. Most people know smoking is detrimental to one's health. It causes cancer and other illnesses. Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 13. VOCABULARY FOR COMPREHENSION Complete the following sentences with an expression

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 13. VOCABULARY FOR COMPREHENSION Complete the following sentences with an expression from the list below. Use appropriate forms of the words. absence chlorine municipalities taste buds aroma criterion swallow water treatment plant carbon detect 1. Cities, or ________, from all over the country participated in the annual water contest. 2. Taste is the ________, or standard, often used to purchase bottled water. 3. The citizens were outraged by the ________ of information about bacterial pollutants in the town's water supply. 4. A ________ filter is a special device used to remove impurities from water. 5. Providing pure, delicious water is a complex process. Great tasting, safe water must be purified in a _____. 6. The chemical ________ is often used to keep swimming pools clean and colors it blue. 7. The ________ of freshly baked bread is appealing. Water, on the other hand, should not have any smell. 8. The dangerous bacteria in the water were ________ after thousands of people got sick. 9. Professional water tasters shouldn‘t ________ the water. They should just swish it around in their mouths, and then spit it out. 10. The ________ for sweets are located on the tip of the tongue. Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 13. LISTENING FOR MAIN IDEAS PART ONE 1. One criterion: ____________________________

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 13. LISTENING FOR MAIN IDEAS PART ONE 1. One criterion: ____________________________ 2. Amazing because: ____________________________ 3. Water treatment plant: ____________________________ 4. Atlantic City water: ____________________________ PART TWO 1. Absence of things: ____________________________ 2. Big impact: ____________________________ 3. Santa Barbara water: ____________________________ 4. Wine tastings: ____________________________ Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 13. LISTENING FOR DETAILS. PART ONE 1. Words such as flinty,

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 13. LISTENING FOR DETAILS. PART ONE 1. Words such as flinty, insouciant, aggressive, saucy, piquant are usually used in contests judging the taste of ___________. 2. The contest was held in ___________. 3. ___________ municipalities competed in the contest. 4. The engineer in Atlantic City runs the water through ___________. 5. The filters remove ___________. 6. Water that is high in chlorine tastes like ___________. Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 13. LISTENING FOR DETAILS. PART TWO 1. To do the aroma

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 13. LISTENING FOR DETAILS. PART TWO 1. To do the aroma check, the tasters take ___________. 2. Chlorine is a chemical used in ___________. 3. 9. Other chemicals that the tasters might smell are ___________. 4. Julia Child, a world renowned chef and cookbook author, said that Santa Barbara tap water turns ___________. 5. Mr. Von Wiesenberger says that Californians drink a lot of bottled water because the tap water is so ___________. 6. The water tasters drank over ___________ waters, both ___________ and ___________. Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 13. LISTENING BETWEEN THE LINES Excerpt One Would winning first prize

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 13. LISTENING BETWEEN THE LINES Excerpt One Would winning first prize in this contest be enough to convince you to trust the safety of the water? Why or why not? Excerpt Two If having no taste is a criterion for excellent water, how can they possibly be judging the water for taste? Excerpt Three What does your water smell like? If you were a judge, which would be easier for you — smelling the water, or tasting the water? In your opinion, which criterion is more important? Why? Excerpt Four Have you ever tasted water like the one Mr. Von Wiesenberger described? He uses unusual nouns, like mustiness, or swampiness, to describe the water. What other adjectives can you think of to describe water? Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 13. AUDIO 1. Introduction 2. Part 1 3. Part 2 4.

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 13. AUDIO 1. Introduction 2. Part 1 3. Part 2 4. Excerpt 1 5. Excerpt 2 6. Excerpt 3 7. Excerpt 4 Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 14. EXPANDING THE TOPIC. PART ONE: POISON IN THE WELL 1.

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 14. EXPANDING THE TOPIC. PART ONE: POISON IN THE WELL 1. Tell me, what's gone wrong. I tilt my head there, under the (1) _____, but when I turn it on dry as paper. Call the (2) _____. Who's to blame, for what's going on? In the (3) _______without a clue I'm just the same as you. 2. O, they tell us there's (4) ________ in the well, that someone's been a bit untidy and there's been a small (5) _____. Not a lot, no, just a drop. But there you are mistaken, you know you are. I (6) ______ just how long they knew our well was poisoned but they let us just (7) ______ on. 4. So tell me, where to (17) ______, if your fight for a bearable life can be fought and lost in your (18) _____ ? O, don't tell us there's poison in the well, that (19) ____ been a bit untidy, that there's been a small spill. And all that it (20) _____ to is a tear in a salted sea, that someone's been a bit untidy, they'll have it cleaned up in a week. 3. O, they tell us there's poison in the (8) _____, that someone's been a bit (9) _____and there's been a small spill. All that it amounts to is a (10) _____ in a salted (11) _______, that someone's been a bit untidy, they'll have it (12) _____ up in a week. But the (13) _______ is over, now it's growing into (14) ______ since I was told that I should be calm, there's (15) ______ to fear here. But I drank that water for years, my (16) ______ and my children. Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 14. EXPANDING THE TOPIC. PART TWO 1. ". . . but

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 14. EXPANDING THE TOPIC. PART TWO 1. ". . . but when I turn it on dry as paper. “ This means that ______ water is coming out of the faucet. a. no b. a little c. poisoned a. 2. "Call the neighbors. Who's to blame for what's going on? 5. In the dark without a clue I'm just the same as you. " This line implies that the neighbors ____ the problem. a. know what caused b. caused c. don't know what caused ". . . where to now, if your fight for a bearable life can be fought and lost in your backyard? “ The singer probably feels that the problem _____ be solved. a. may b. will definitely c. will not 3. "O, they tell us there's poison in the well. . . “ In this line, "they" refers to the _____. a. owner of the house b. municipal water company c. neighbors knew the well was poisoned but tried to hide the information b. just found out the well was poisoned but didn't think it was important c. didn't know the well was poisoned 6. "All that it amounts to is a tear in a salted sea. “ This suggests that the water company believes the problem _________. a. is insignificant b. cannot be tasted 4. "I wonder just how long they knew our well was poisoned c. doesn't exist but they let us just drink on. “ The singer suspects that the water company ______. Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LINKING LISTENINGS 13&14 EXPLORING LANGUAGE. PART ONE Working with a partner, look

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LINKING LISTENINGS 13&14 EXPLORING LANGUAGE. PART ONE Working with a partner, look at the list of specialized adjectives. Notice the positive (+) and negative ( ) connotation of each word. On the chart that follows, categorize the words according to taste, aroma (smell), clarity, viscosity (density), and carbonation level (CO 2). Some adjectives can be listed in more than one category. - acidic bland + bright + brilliant + bubbly + clear cloudy foamy + fresh gritty hazy heavy + mild muddy musty oaky sour +spicy + spritzy sulfuric + sweet swampy thin - watery Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LINKING LISTENINGS 13&14 EXPLORING LANGUAGE. PART TWO In this role play, work

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LINKING LISTENINGS 13&14 EXPLORING LANGUAGE. PART TWO In this role play, work with a partner. Choose role A or B for the following situations and read only your role. 1. Role A You are grocery shopping with your roommate. You need to buy coffee. You have very traditional taste and do not want to buy expensive, gourmet coffee. You love the taste of the store brand, and it's very inex pensive. Convince your roommate to buy it. Role B You are grocery shopping with your room mate. You adore expensive, gourmet coffee and can't bear to drink the cheap, store brand kind. Your friend insists on buying the store brand coffee. Convince your roommate to buy a new brand of exotic coffee instead. Use some of these words in your conversation: aroma bitter light miserable acidic light strong aroma muddy watery fresh sweet 2. Role A You are a customer at the World of Wine store. You are selecting a wine for a dinner party for fifty people. The main dish will be chicken. You are working on a very tight budget. Explain to the salesclerk what you are looking for. Use some of these words in your conversation: bland musty sulfuric hazy bright oaky spicy sweet watery sweet gritty heavy Role B You are an experienced salesclerk at World of Wine. You are trying to help a customer who is selecting wine for a party. The customer is only interested in buying popularly priced wine. Convince the customer to purchase a better tasting, more expensive, and elegant wine. Use some of these words in your conversation: bitter musty heavy bland bright oaky brilliant sweet Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LINKING LISTENINGS 13&14 WORKING WITH WORDS Working with a partner read the

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LINKING LISTENINGS 13&14 WORKING WITH WORDS Working with a partner read the opinions of the people interviewed for the news article. Match the highlighted words with the similar expressions in the list that follows the news article and write the appropriate number in the blanks Are You Concerned about the Quality of Your Drinking Water? Even though the United States is supposed to have one of the safest drinking water supplies in the world, I am concerned. At times when I (1) run the tap water, a strong musty aroma (2) comes through. I take a (3) sip and it indeed tastes strange. I'm worried. Ann Davis, 29 Engineer Toledo, Ohio Nothing is safe anymore, including our water. My water filter (4) turns my chlorine tasting water into slightly better water, but not much. I'm (5) dying to buy one of those expensive water coolers, but we can't afford it now. Stephen Dingell, 59 Bank Teller New Brunswick, NJ I am furious about our water. The polluted Mississippi River is right (6) in my back yard. The municipal government always (7) keeps us in the dark. They tell us nothing. They say it can't be. You are (8) mistaken. My family's health is my top priority. My children, and grandchildren are (9) dear to my heart. They must be protected. George Kuntz, 71 Retired Columbus, Missouri I am lucky to live in Atlantic City, the home of the water that came in first at the Toast to the Tap Contest. Our water treatment plant manufactures an end product that is simply superior. If you take even a small sip you'll see there is no (10) aftertaste. The Atlantic City airport also invites travelers to visit a tasting bar to (11) sample the water and compare it with that of other cities. Cyndi Weaver, 39 Homemaker Atlantic City, NJ a. wrong b. remaining taste c. in my neighborhood d. turn on e. small taste f. changes g. try; taste h. appears i. special and precious j. really wanting to k. hides information Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 15. LISTENING FOR MAIN IDEAS. PART ONE 1. According to a

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 15. LISTENING FOR MAIN IDEAS. PART ONE 1. According to a recent study, music and art education can a. b. c. increase students' appreciation of nature. improve reading and math skills. improve math, but not reading skills. 2. The purpose of the special arts program in Rhode Island was to a. b. c. help students appreciate the arts. make students' education more well rounded. investigate the impact of arts training. 3. The special arts program in Rhode Island took advantage of children's natural inclination to master skills in a. b. c. sequencing. testing. building. 4. At the end of the test period, the researchers checked the children's a. b. c. attitude. test scores. attitude and test scores. Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 15. LISTENING FOR MAIN IDEAS. PART TWO 1. Children who benefit

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 15. LISTENING FOR MAIN IDEAS. PART TWO 1. Children who benefit from arts training are those with a. b. c. involved parents. artistic talent. no special talent. 2. Scientists have made some guesses as to how music may enhance mathematical skills. One factor not mentioned is that arts training a. b. c. increases self esteem. relaxes nervous students. teaches students how to learn new things. 4. Scientists and educators are now more aware that a rich learning environment can help children a. b. c. learn more. become more artistic. become more musical. Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 15. AUDIO 1. Preparing to Listen 2. Introduction 3. Part 1

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 15. AUDIO 1. Preparing to Listen 2. Introduction 3. Part 1 4. Part 2 5. Excerpt 1 6. Excerpt 2 Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 16. AUDIO 1. Part 1 2. Part 2 3. Part 3

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LISTENING 16. AUDIO 1. Part 1 2. Part 2 3. Part 3 4. Part 4 Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LINKING LISTENINGS 15&16 In a small group, discuss the answers to the

ACADEMIC LISTENING: LINKING LISTENINGS 15&16 In a small group, discuss the answers to the following questions: 1. What new or surprising information did you find out from the Newsweek on Air interview with Sharon Begley? 2. How has the information you have learned in both interviews changed your way of thinking about school curricula? About parenting? 3. Besides art and music, what else might boost intelligence? Games? Food? Explain. 4. In your opinion, besides increasing intelligence, what other purposes do art and musical experiences serve? 5. The research results indicate the importance of arts education in schools. Why is it, then, that so many U. S. schools ignore music and art and emphasize reading and math instead? Is arts education only a "frill, " a supplementary activity to be added only if there's time and money? Contents

ACADEMIC LISTENING: REFERENCES 1. Lebauer, Roni S. Learn to listen; Listen to learn :

ACADEMIC LISTENING: REFERENCES 1. Lebauer, Roni S. Learn to listen; Listen to learn : academic listening and note taking. White Plains Longman. 2000. 225 р. 2. Preiss, Sherry. Northstar: Focus on Listening and Speaking. Advanced. S. I. Longman. 1998. 280 p. Contents