A WELLNESS APPROACH OF COMBATING COMPASSION FATIGUE ALEX

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A WELLNESS APPROACH OF COMBATING COMPASSION FATIGUE ALEX ROWELL, PSY. D WELLNESS COORDINATOR AND

A WELLNESS APPROACH OF COMBATING COMPASSION FATIGUE ALEX ROWELL, PSY. D WELLNESS COORDINATOR AND PSYCHOLOGY RESIDENT AT CVM

WHY IS THIS IMPORTANT? • “Student veterinarians face the same ultimatum, both during and

WHY IS THIS IMPORTANT? • “Student veterinarians face the same ultimatum, both during and after veterinary school. While in school, student veterinarians must tend to self-care in order to continue to be able to learn, grow, and maintain healthy relationships with peers and teachers. ” – Marie K. Holowaychuk, DVM, DACVECC, CYT • How often do you engage in self care? A day? A week? A month? • How has this changed since starting here at OSU school? • Self-care is usually the first thing we put to the side, especially when we become stressed out, overwhelmed, or are faced with too many personal and professional challenges.

WHAT THE DATA SAYS • 233 veterinary students’ report over last year during veterinary

WHAT THE DATA SAYS • 233 veterinary students’ report over last year during veterinary school (Kogan et al. , 2005) • 49% - dating/marital relationship difficulties • 73% - Family/friend relationship difficulties • 87% - Felt stress • 93% - Felt overwhelmed • 47% - Felt hopeless • 59% of veterinary students indicate there is an increased need for veterinary students to have access to counseling and mental health services (Pickles et al. , 2012). • 60% of students have family members with a mental health history of anxiety, depression, and substance abuse.

DEFINING THE TERMS • Stress: The emotional, mental, and/or physical strain that results from

DEFINING THE TERMS • Stress: The emotional, mental, and/or physical strain that results from too many pressures and demands in one’s life, typically from external sources. Stress can cause burnout and compassion fatigue. • Burnout: Is a condition that occurs when, in responding to excessive stresses and demands, an individual demands too much of him or herself, eventually becoming overwhelmed, exhausted, apathetic, and negative. • Compassion Fatigue: Physical and spiritual exhaustion, accompanied by acute emotional pain, that stems from a caregiving person. The caregiver is working continuously with the suffering of others, but in the process stops taking care of his or her own needs. It can be thought of as a combination of burnout and secondary trauma. • Compassion satisfaction: Receiving a feeling of enjoyment and fulfillment out of one‘s work; stems from a internal drive that often motivates one to strive to continue to excel in one’s clinical practice.

WHAT STRESS DOES TO THE BRAIN • https: //www. youtube. com/watch? v=Wuy. Pu. H

WHAT STRESS DOES TO THE BRAIN • https: //www. youtube. com/watch? v=Wuy. Pu. H 9 oj. CE

ADDING IT ALL UP • Stress can cause burnout. • If one is not

ADDING IT ALL UP • Stress can cause burnout. • If one is not able to use healthy coping skills, then there is a build up. • For example, like shaking a 2 liter bottle of soda. • The next phase can be thought of as a combination of burnout and secondary trauma/compassion fatigue. • Secondary trauma is often the result of a medical caregiver’s unique and empathic relationship with a patient, through which the over-identification allows the caregiver to “take on the burden” of the sick or terminally ill patients. • It may look like being too emotionally invested in the case or being totally disengaged/blunted. • In order to combat this cannot find balance between our professional and personal lives.

WHAT TO LOOK FOR? • Here are some signs to look for when you

WHAT TO LOOK FOR? • Here are some signs to look for when you are worried about a classmate or colleague: 1. Bottled-up emotions 2. Sadness and apathy 3. Inability to get pleasure from activities that previously were enjoyable 4. Isolation 5. Difficulty concentrating 6. Chronic physical ailments 7. Voicing excessive complaints about your job, your manager(s) and/or co-workers 8. Lack of self-care, including poor hygiene and a drop-off in your appearance 9. Recurring nightmares or flashbacks 10. Substance abuse or other compulsive behaviors such as over-eating or gambling AVMA, 2017

GETTING RECOGNITION AMONG THE FIELD OF VETERINARY MEDICINE ? • https: //www. youtube. com/watch?

GETTING RECOGNITION AMONG THE FIELD OF VETERINARY MEDICINE ? • https: //www. youtube. com/watch? v=Sh. ZO 1 UXDHu 4 • https: //www. youtube. com/watch? v=Hrt. UXu. GP 6 Hk • “It’s a critical need and one we can’t afford to ignore, ” Dr. Davis said. “With mental health, I hope we can benefit the profession as much as veterinarians benefit science. That’s the goal: to actually make a difference in people’s lives. ”

THE WELLNESS WHEEL

THE WELLNESS WHEEL

THE INDIVIDUAL DIMENSIONS OF THE WHEEL • Physical Wellness- individuals who achieve or strive

THE INDIVIDUAL DIMENSIONS OF THE WHEEL • Physical Wellness- individuals who achieve or strive towards physical wellness are able to integrate knowledge about nutrition, healthy eating habits, exercise, fitness, and personal hygiene into their everyday life. This can be as simple as drinking enough water a day; that is about 2 liters a day or eight 8 ounce glasses. • Intellectual Wellness- focuses on one’s life-long learning ability to be open and challenge our minds with new concepts, issues, and experiences. It involves being engaged in a creative process and expanding our knowledge and skills…… As a professional students, I am sure you all do this every day! • Occupational Wellness- the career dimension that recognizes the personal satisfaction and enrichment that one can gain through work and school. It focuses on finding a satisfying and rewarding job or career where you can contribute your knowledge, skills, and experience. It also involves the ability to achieve a balance between our work and personal lives.

THE INDIVIDUAL DIMENSIONS OF THE WHEEL • Emotional wellness- focuses on the ability to

THE INDIVIDUAL DIMENSIONS OF THE WHEEL • Emotional wellness- focuses on the ability to understand, share, and manage our feelings and thoughts. It is also affected by the degree to which we are positive and enthusiastic about life and are able cope with life's challenges. If you feel you like you struggle in this area, you can refer to the CBT information I sent out last week for some helpful advice. • Social Wellness- the social component focuses on our ability to interact and relate to others. It is influenced by the degree to which we can establish and maintain positive relationships and contribute to campus, hospital, community, and environment. • Spiritual Wellness- the spiritual dimension recognizes the importance of searching for meaning and purpose in life. It involves gaining a better understanding of your beliefs and goals then reflecting on whether or not you are living a life that is congruent with your personal values. This does not necessarily mean you have to identify with a certain organized religion.

WELLNESS EXERCISE • Hand out to evaluation your current health and overall well-being based

WELLNESS EXERCISE • Hand out to evaluation your current health and overall well-being based on the dimensions we just talked about: • Thoughts? Reactions?

THINGS YOU CAN DO RIGHT NOW • Bond with your co-workers, friends, and colleagues

THINGS YOU CAN DO RIGHT NOW • Bond with your co-workers, friends, and colleagues over a healthy lunch or walk. • Create a comfortable workspace or study space by requesting an ergonomic evaluation or meeting with a physical therapist at Dixon. • Take MANDOTRY stretch and water breaks to stay energized throughout the day. • Bring a healthy lunch from home or choose a healthy option when eating out. If you are confused in regards what is healthy… ask yourself “Would you find this in nature? ” • Hold walking meetings to provide opportunities for exercise and creative thinking. • Prepare healthy meal options for office meetings and potlucks. Carve time out on a Sundays to do this.

WAYS TO REDUCE BURNOUT AND HOW TO HIT THE RESET BUTTON 1. Schedule regular

WAYS TO REDUCE BURNOUT AND HOW TO HIT THE RESET BUTTON 1. Schedule regular social activities- Not matter what…. . You have to do it. 2. Follow a fitness plan- Something you enjoy and can be reasonable accomplished within your work schedule, i. e. going on a walk around the building or riding your bike to school. 3. Ask for help from someone you feel comfortable around or trust. 4. Do not look for excuses not to do something, instead look for reasons to do something. 5. Schedule free time like you would schedule studying time or like you are going to class.

WHAT CAN SOMEONE DO TO STOP IT? • Self-compassion- is extending compassion to one's

WHAT CAN SOMEONE DO TO STOP IT? • Self-compassion- is extending compassion to one's self in instances of perceived inadequacy, failure, or general suffering. Kristin Neff has defined self-compassion as being composed of three main components – self-kindness, common humanity, and mindfulness. • Three important elements 1. Self-Kindness- entails being warm and understanding towards ourselves when we suffer, fail, or feel inadequate. One does not ignore their pain or become self-critical. 2. Common humanity- Involves recognizing that suffering and personal inadequacy is part of the shared human experience – something that we all go through rather than being something that happens to “me” alone. 3. Mindfulness- Mindfulness is a non-judgmental, receptive mind state in which one observes thoughts and feelings as they are, without trying to suppress or deny them.

AN EXERCISE • Loving-kindness is an important aspect of self-care. Wishing health and well-being

AN EXERCISE • Loving-kindness is an important aspect of self-care. Wishing health and well-being for others can help us feel more connected to people around us and more in touch with our motivation to support and care for the people we love. Developing these wishes for ourselves can be a source of motivation and support to care for ourselves. • Importantly, bringing an attitude of warmth, kindness, and concern to painful experiences (our own or others) creates compassion. Loving-kindness can help us have the courage we need to face difficult experiences, and to offer support to ourselves or others who are suffering. • Most people find it easy and familiar to send well-wishes of this kind to other people. However, the idea of sending these wishes to ourselves can feel uncomfortable, strange, and awkward. This is why we first start practicing loving-kindness for a loved one, and then gradually “slip ourselves in” to receive our own kindness.

MORE TIPS • Silence your inner self-talk. Our inner dialogue isn’t always kind or

MORE TIPS • Silence your inner self-talk. Our inner dialogue isn’t always kind or accepting. When you catch myself engaging in negative self-talk or self-doubt, i. e. “I am not good enough” or “Why is everyone doing better than me? ” remind myself that you are enough, that you are doing excellent work. Think about how far you have come…. • Recognize You are not the only one going through this. As vet med students this experience is very true. Part of self-compassion is recognizing that you are human and will make mistakes, this is part of the human experience. It helps to remember that you’re not alone. " • The mask of perfectionism is very costly to both our mental and physical health; it is like trying to outrun a massive tidal wave. Perfectionistic thinking is a close companion of self perceived inadequacy, self-doubt and shame.

TYING IT ALL TOGETHER • Stress, burnout, and compassion fatigue can rob you of

TYING IT ALL TOGETHER • Stress, burnout, and compassion fatigue can rob you of the reason why you joined this profession. This can also cause mental health alignments, i. e. depression, anxiety, and substance abuse. • 24. 5 percent of males and 36. 7 percent of females in veterinary medicine have experienced depressive episodes since veterinary school. This is about 1 1/2 times higher than the prevalence in U. S. adults- (JAVMA, 2015). • You are not alone. Whether you have personally struggled with stress and burnout or know someone who has. If you see it (look for the signs) talk to someone or send them to the appropriate resources.

TYING IT ALL TOGETHER • Stress, burnout, and compassion fatigue are not some made

TYING IT ALL TOGETHER • Stress, burnout, and compassion fatigue are not some made up terms or pseudoscience. The have acute and prolonged consequences on your mental and physical health. • Increased blood pressure and blood sugar • Migraine and tension headaches • Impaired or decrease cognitive functioning, i. e. difficulties in memory acquisition and recall • Being more mindful and self-compassionate. • It takes practice and intentionality, but that is the point. • Remember how amazing all of you are, Serisouly. That however you come to class, clinics, roations realize something you are enough!

FINALLY • https: //www. youtube. com/watch? v=tt. F 9 y. CCtg. BU&index=1&list=PL 4 Qoyn

FINALLY • https: //www. youtube. com/watch? v=tt. F 9 y. CCtg. BU&index=1&list=PL 4 Qoyn 0 na 9 zvr XVwh. Fr. XUr. E 3 Jk-Gybs. HT • “Overall, we propose greater cross talk between human health care professionals and veterinary health care workers to share ideas about occupational health and wellness, since there are many overlapping issues, and the two groups have much to learn from each other, ” Dr. Rabinowitz (CDC’s National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health)

MY INFORMATION • Monday: 2 -6 pm § Individual Counseling/Therapy • Tuesday: 8 -6

MY INFORMATION • Monday: 2 -6 pm § Individual Counseling/Therapy • Tuesday: 8 -6 pm § Wellness coaching • Wednesday: 2 -6 pm § Consultation services • Thursday: Not at CVM § Outreach/seminars focused on specific topics • Friday: 11 -3 pm § Referrals around OSU and the greater community • Please feel free to schedule an appointment by calling CAPS: 541 -737 -2131 or e-mail me directly @ alex. [email protected] edu • Or if my office door is open please swing by and say hello § Guest lectures from other health care providers § Speaking to certain classes or student groups at CVM