526 Po Po POetry Vocabulary 20 Quiz Poetry

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5/26 Po. Po POetry Vocabulary 20 Quiz Poetry Terms 5 Steps to a Poison

5/26 Po. Po POetry Vocabulary 20 Quiz Poetry Terms 5 Steps to a Poison Tree HW: Finish finding examples for poetry terms

Terms to know… read definition AND find an example 1. Speaker 2. Alliteration 3.

Terms to know… read definition AND find an example 1. Speaker 2. Alliteration 3. Anaphora 4. Assonance 5. Apostrophe 6. Blank verse 7. Free verse 8. End Rhyme 9. Rhyme Scheme 10. Implied Metaphor Terms to use (already know) • • • Stanza Tone Simile Metaphor Personification Imagery/ 5 sense description

5 Steps to Decoding a Poem 5 Step Process to Understanding Poetry 1 Brainstorm

5 Steps to Decoding a Poem 5 Step Process to Understanding Poetry 1 Brainstorm Title- what does it mean? 2 Read poem all the way through. 3 Underline any unfamiliar words- define them and replace in poem. 4 Re-read poem with new words in place. 5 Summarize stanza by stanza-write analysis in paragraph form.

i. Z U q K c s e i f Qu. I i t

i. Z U q K c s e i f Qu. I i t n e d i m a e t – e l p m a x e n a e r a device Sh

Terms to know… 1. Speaker - different than the author, the “character” that seems

Terms to know… 1. Speaker - different than the author, the “character” that seems to be saying the poem *William Blake did not kill his friend with a poison apple – the 2. 3. 3. • SPEAKER did Alliteration - The repetition of beginning letter of a word Peter Piper Picked a Patch of Pickled Peppers Anaphora - repetition of a word or phrase at the beginning of the line “My life is my purpose. My life is my goal. My life is my inspiration. ” Assonance - matched vowels are the same, but the consonants are not the same Fire at the private eye hired to pry in my business. She seems to beam rays of sunshine with her eyes of green. Apostrophe – when the speaker addresses a person or abstract idea/being/thing that is not present. Oh God why have you forsaken me! Mom! You forgot to pack my cookies urrr!

Blank Verse VS Free Verse Blank verse has no rhyme BUT the meter must

Blank Verse VS Free Verse Blank verse has no rhyme BUT the meter must be regular (pattern of syllables – sometimes 10 per line). Free verse, on the other hand, has no rhyme scheme and no pattern of meter. Free verse generally mimics natural speech, while blank verse still carries a musical quality due to its meter.

Blank Verse FREE Verse HAMLET: To be, or not to be- that is the

Blank Verse FREE Verse HAMLET: To be, or not to be- that is the question: Whether ’tis nobler in the mind to suffer The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune Or to take arms against a sea of troubles, And by opposing end them. To die- to sleep. No more; and by a sleep to say we end The heartache, and the thousand natural shocks That flesh is heir to. ‘Tis a consummation Devoutly to be wish’d. To die- to sleep. To sleep- perchance to dream: ay, there’s the rub! Churchill We shall go on to the end. We shall fight in France, we shall fight on the seas and oceans, we shall fight with growing confidence and growing strength in the air, we shall defend our island, whatever the cost may be. We shall fight on the beaches, we shall fight on the landing grounds, we shall fight in the fields and in the streets, we shall fight in the hills; we shall never surrender… **Does not rhyme **has 10 -11 syllables per line – creates a **no rhyme (although free verse can have some just no preset pattern) ** no structure/pattern

Terms to know… 8. End Rhyme - rhymed sound at the end of the

Terms to know… 8. End Rhyme - rhymed sound at the end of the line. 9. Rhyme Scheme - a repeated pattern of end rhymes; usually marked with letters of the alphabet Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day? A Thou art more lovely and more temperate: B Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, A And summer’s lease hath all too short a date: B 10. Implied metaphor –a comparison is not as direct – compares two unlike things, but it does so without mentioning one of them. Implies the comparison by using a word or phrase that describes the unmentioned term “…whose eyes were always covered with the bruised petals of her

Terms we ALREADY know… • Stanza – a verse (paragraph) in a poem •

Terms we ALREADY know… • Stanza – a verse (paragraph) in a poem • Tone – The author’s attitude towards the subject jubilant aggravating somber • Personification - giving human characteristics/emotions to objects/animals. The sky was reaching towards me. • Imagery - Use descriptive words and/or figurative language to create a picture in reader’s mind. “Papery petals drifted, darkening the windows. • Simile – comparison using LIKE, AS, or THAN • My smile was as bright AS the sun. • Metaphor – direct comparison (extended metaphor – longer/more detailed metaphor – more developed) • My heart was my lantern in the darkness of being alone

A Poison Tree • Use 5 steps on William Blake poem 5 Step Process

A Poison Tree • Use 5 steps on William Blake poem 5 Step Process to Understanding Poetry 1 Brainstorm Title- what does it mean? 2 Read poem all the way through. 3 Underline any unfamiliar words- define them and replace in poem. 4 Re-read poem with new words in place. 5 Summarize stanza by stanza-write analysis in paragraph form.

A Poison Tree 1. Identify the central idea (theme) of the poem (focus on

A Poison Tree 1. Identify the central idea (theme) of the poem (focus on implied meaning – not literal) : “The Poison Tree” by William Blake is implying… 2. Find the following poetic devices: - Anaphora - End rhyme - Alliteration - Assonance - Extended metaphor – what two things are being compared through the second half of the poem?

VERSUS!!! Analyzing the poem: 1 What parts of a cat’s body are mentioned in

VERSUS!!! Analyzing the poem: 1 What parts of a cat’s body are mentioned in Sandburg’s poem? 2 What parts of a cat’s body are mentioned in Eliot’s poem? What catlike actions does Eliot describe? 3 Where does the fog end up in Sandburg’s poem? In Eliot’s? 4 Why do you think these two poets chose to describe fog in terms of a cat’s action? Could the fog just as well be compared to an elephant or a canary or a snake? Explain.

Analyzing the poem: “We Real Cool” 1 Who is the speaker of the poem?

Analyzing the poem: “We Real Cool” 1 Who is the speaker of the poem? (remember the speaker and the poet are NOT the same person) 2 Read the poem aloud several times stressing different words with each reading. How does the meaning of the poem change as the emphasis changes? 3 The first line of the poem is “We real cool. ” What is the TONE of this poem – what is the POET’S attitude towards the speaker and his friends? 4 Why did Brooks choose to have “we” as the last word in each line except for the last line? 5 What will be the fate of the speaker? 6 What is the THEME (message) Brooks is trying to send? (use a complete sentence)

Brain Break! t e e No T ! ! e m a G h

Brain Break! t e e No T ! ! e m a G h

Label the Rhyme Scheme Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day? A Thou

Label the Rhyme Scheme Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day? A Thou art more lovely and more temperate. B Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, A And summer’s lease hath all too short a date. B Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines, C D And often is his gold complexion dimmed; C And every fair from fair sometime declines, D By chance, or nature’s changing course, untrimmed; E But thy eternal summer shall not fade, F Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow’st, E Nor shall death brag thou wand’rest in his shade, F When in eternal lines to Time thou grow’st. G So long as men can breathe, or eyes can see, G