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4 th step: services FOLLOW‐UP 3 rd step: OUTLINING ACTIONS 2 nd step: RISK

4 th step: services FOLLOW‐UP 3 rd step: OUTLINING ACTIONS 2 nd step: RISK ASSESSMENT 1 st step: RISK IDENTIFICATION About the Integration Module Wrap‐up Materials INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE RISK ASSESSMENT AND CASE DOCUMENTATION Start with clicking the page 'About the Integration Module'

INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE RISK ASSESSMENT AND CASE DOCUMENTATION The purpose of this

INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE RISK ASSESSMENT AND CASE DOCUMENTATION The purpose of this modular tool is to link various risk assessment procedures and enhance the identification of domestic violence among key agencies (e. g. police officers, social work and healthcare professionals, NGO workers, educators) who come into contact with victim‐survivors and perpetrators. This tool demonstrates different risk factors and different approaches to identifying and responding to risk. You can use this tool e. g. as a training material or a database. On the left we present the four steps of the domestic violence risk assessment process from risk identification all the way to follow-up. In the 'Wrap-up' section, you can find a shorter description of the risk assessment process. 'Materials' will provide you with recommended reading and some free printable items. Do not forget to print your own pocket version of the risk assessment check list – with it, you may save somebody's life. Start with the 1 st step: RISK IDENTIFICATION About the Integration Module 4 th step: services FOLLOW‐UP 3 rd step: OUTLINING ACTIONS 2 nd step: RISK ASSESSMENT 1 st step: RISK IDENTIFICATION Wrap‐up Materials Dear frontline responder, welcome to learn about the domestic violence risk assessment process in a multiprofessional context!

1 st step: RISK IDENTIFICATION About the Integration Module 4 th step: services FOLLOW‐UP

1 st step: RISK IDENTIFICATION About the Integration Module 4 th step: services FOLLOW‐UP 3 rd step: OUTLINING ACTIONS 2 nd step: RISK ASSESSMENT Wrap‐up Materials INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE RISK ASSESSMENT AND This is Nora. She will be our guide in demonstrating the steps CASE DOCUMENTATION of risk assessment. Photo by Andrea Piacquadio from Pexels

INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE Risk identification – RISK ASSESSMENT AND whose business is

INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE Risk identification – RISK ASSESSMENT AND whose business is it anyway? Case 'Nora' CASE DOCUMENTATION Click here to learn why it is your business. Risk factors to identify Guidelines for DV case documentation After reading about risk identification, click the page of 2 nd step: RISK ASSESSMENT to learn what to do with all the collected information. 1 st step: RISK IDENTIFICATION About the Integration Module 4 th step: services FOLLOW‐UP 3 rd step: OUTLINING ACTIONS 2 nd step: RISK ASSESSMENT Wrap‐up Materials Risk assessment is a process, that begins with identifying the presence of risk factors and determining the likelihood of an adverse event occurring, its consequences and its timing. Read first about Nora's case and then click the boxes below to learn more about risk identification.

Risk factors Close x INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE RISK ASSESSMENT AND CASE DOCUMENTATION

Risk factors Close x INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE RISK ASSESSMENT AND CASE DOCUMENTATION Critical domestic violence risk factors Risk related information to check by each professional There are several factors that may indicate escalation of domestic violence. They should be identified by every frontline responder –a police officer, social worker, nurse, doctor, educator or NGO worker. Key agencies should work to a shared understanding of risk, but the nature of their work may mean that they will be able to identify different risk factors. The perspective of a police officer differs from the perspective of a social worker. Victim's vulnerability factors relate to the victim's person and life circumstances. They may relate, e. g. to the capacity to trust public authorities, leave the abuser, or the dependency on the abuser. 1 st step: RISK IDENTIFICATION About the Integration Module 4 th step: services FOLLOW‐UP 3 rd step: OUTLINING ACTIONS 2 nd step: RISK ASSESSMENT Wrap‐up Materials Effective identification of domestic violence risk factors consists of three levels. We call these 'critical domestic violence risk factors', 'risk related information to check by each professional' and 'victim's vulnerability factors'. Click on each box to read more.

Risk factors Close x INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE RISK ASSESSMENT AND CASE DOCUMENTATION

Risk factors Close x INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE RISK ASSESSMENT AND CASE DOCUMENTATION Critical domestic violence risk factors Risk related information to check by each professional Victim's vulnerability factors Hint: put the cursor over the text to see The perpetrator is more detailed description Close x q using violence more frequently q using more intensive (harmful, The perpetrator has injurious) violence q strangled the victim q controlling but also dependent on the q stalked the victim; online abuse and victim digital stalking are increasingly used q using physical violence to abuse and exert control q using economic violence q experienced negative life changes q using digital violence q mental health issues q using sexual violence q substance abuse issues q using coercive control q threatened to kill the victim The victim is q planning a divorce or separation q pregnant or has a baby 1 st step: RISK IDENTIFICATION About the Integration Module 4 th step: services FOLLOW‐UP 3 rd step: OUTLINING ACTIONS 2 nd step: RISK ASSESSMENT Wrap‐up Materials Effective identification of domestic violence risk factors consists of three levels. We call these 'critical domestic violence risk factors', 'risk related information to check by each professional' and 'victim's vulnerability factors'. Click on each box to read more.

Risk factors Close x INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE RISK ASSESSMENT AND CASE DOCUMENTATION

Risk factors Close x INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE RISK ASSESSMENT AND CASE DOCUMENTATION Critical domestic violence risk factors Risk related information to check by each professional Victim's vulnerability factors Close x POLICE SOCIAL WORK HEALTH CARE The perpetrator has q The victim is not allowed The victim q access to firearms to meet a social worker q has symptoms of q used a weapon in the strangulation alone most recent event q Signs of substance or non‐ q has prior injuries caused by trauma q previous criminal record substance addictive q is not allowed to see the entries behavior including co‐ q previously violated a addiction (by partners or nurse/doctor alone restraining order family members) q Signs of conflict behavior that may lead to potential escalation of conflict 1 st step: RISK IDENTIFICATION Aboutthe Integration Module 4 th step: services FOLLOW‐UP 3 rd step: OUTLINING ACTIONS 2 nd step: RISK ASSESSMENT Wrap‐up Materials Effective identification of domestic violence risk factors consists of three levels. We call these 'critical domestic violence risk factors', 'risk related information to check by each professional' and 'victim's vulnerability factors'. Click on each box to read more.

Risk factors Close x INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE RISK ASSESSMENT AND CASE DOCUMENTATION

Risk factors Close x INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE RISK ASSESSMENT AND CASE DOCUMENTATION Critical domestic violence risk factors Risk related information to check by each professional Victim's vulnerability factors Close x Note: These are not reasons why the abuse happens. Perpetrators may Close x choose to exploit vulnerabilities of victims; some victims' life experiences and circumstances may make it more difficult to survive or escape abuse. The victim q is an elderly person The victim experiences q is a disabled person q strong fear q is dependent on the perpetrator q social isolation q is an immigrant or a refugee q mental health issues q is a minor q substance abuse issues q is a homeless person q is an illiterate person The family or community of a victim or a q belongs to sexual or gender minority perpetrator is justifying violence based on q belongs to an ethnic minority q honour/culture/religion 1 st step: RISK IDENTIFICATION About the Integration Module 4 th step: services FOLLOW‐UP 3 rd step: OUTLINING ACTIONS 2 nd step: RISK ASSESSMENT Wrap‐up Materials Effective identification of domestic violence risk factors consists of three levels. We call these 'critical domestic violence risk factors', 'risk related information to check by each professional' and 'victim's vulnerability factors'. Click on each box to read more.

INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE RISK ASSESSMENT AND Case 'Nora' CASE DOCUMENTATION Risk assessment

INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE RISK ASSESSMENT AND Case 'Nora' CASE DOCUMENTATION Risk assessment tools Recognize the high risk moments and triggers for increasing risk After reading about risk assessment, click the page of the 3 rd step: OUTLINING ACTIONS to learn how risk assessment leads to taking measures. Module General guidelines 2 nd step: 1 st step: RISK ASSESSMENT RISK IDENTIFICATION About the Integration 4 th step: services FOLLOW‐UP 3 rd step: OUTLINING ACTIONS Wrap‐up Materials Risk assessment is a phase, during which the level of the risk and its nature assessed. Start with reading how risks are assessed in Nora's case. Then take a look at the general guidelines, risk assessment tools and high‐risk moments.

Why we need a strong co‐operation network To do –list for the frontline responders

Why we need a strong co‐operation network To do –list for the frontline responders After reading about outlining the actions, click on the page of the 4 th step: FOLLOW‐UP. Module Case 'Nora' INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE RISK ASSESSMENT AND CASE DOCUMENTATION 3 rd step: 2 nd step: OUTLINING ACTIONS 1 st step: RISK ASSESSMENT RISK IDENTIFICATION About the Integration 4 th step: services FOLLOW‐UP Wrap‐up Materials Outlining necessary actions is a phase where the frontline responders in close co‐operation plan safety measures and take action to ensure the victim's safety. Again, read first about Nora's case. Then, look at the to do –list and read why a strong co‐ operation network is crucial.

INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE Why do we need follow‐up? RISK ASSESSMENT AND CASE

INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE Why do we need follow‐up? RISK ASSESSMENT AND CASE DOCUMENTATION Module 4 th step: services 3 rd step: FOLLOW‐UP OUTLINING ACTIONS 2 nd step: RISK ASSESSMENT 1 st step: RISK IDENTIFICATION About the Integration Wrap‐up Materials Follow‐up is a phase, during which the frontline responder is in regular contact with the victim. Read first why we need the follow ‐up phase and then see what the follow‐up looks like in Nora's case. Case 'Nora' If you want to see a short description of the risk assessment process, click on the page Wrap‐up.

Let's wrap this up. Click on each box to see what happens in each

Let's wrap this up. Click on each box to see what happens in each step of risk assessment process: 3 rd step: Outlining the actions 4 th step: Follow‐up Last but not at least: Take a look in the Materials page. Print a pocket version checklist for risk assessment and find more information about risk assessment. Module 2 nd step: Risk Assessment INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE RISK ASSESSMENT AND CASE DOCUMENTATION Wrap‐up 4 th step: services 3 rd step: FOLLOW‐UP OUTLINING ACTIONS 2 nd step: RISK ASSESSMENT 1 st step: RISK IDENTIFICATION About the Integration Materials 1 st step: Risk identification

Materials and recommendable reading Information about risk assessment processes within the EU Module IMPRODOVA

Materials and recommendable reading Information about risk assessment processes within the EU Module IMPRODOVA training platform www. training. improdova. eu Wrap‐up 4 th step: services 3 rd step: FOLLOW‐UP OUTLINING ACTIONS 2 nd step: RISK ASSESSMENT 1 st step: RISK IDENTIFICATION About the Integration • Istanbul Convention • Risk assessment by police of intimate partner violence against women (presentation) • The Influence of Victim Vulnerability and Gender on Police Officers’ Assessment of Intimate Partner Violence Risk (article) • EIGE: Risk assessment and management • A guide to risk assessment and risk management of intimate partner violence against women for police INTEGRATION MODULE A printable pocket‐version of risk assessment check FORlist for frontline DOMESTIC VIOLENCE responders RISK ASSESSMENT AND Safe. Lives DASH risk CASEchecklist DOCUMENTATION Materials Recommendable reading:

Materials and recommendable reading INTEGRATION MODULE A printable pocket‐version Recommendable reading: Information about risk

Materials and recommendable reading INTEGRATION MODULE A printable pocket‐version Recommendable reading: Information about risk assessment processes within theof risk assessment check EU: list for frontline FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE • Istanbul Convention responders • Risk assessment by police of intimate France Germany Hungary RISK Slovenia Finland Portugal Scotland Austria ASSESSMENT AND partner violence against women (presentation) Safe. Lives DASH risk • The Influence of Victim Vulnerability and checklist CASE DOCUMENTATION Gender on Police Officers’ Assessment of IMPRODOVA training platform [link] Module Wrap‐up 4 th step: services 3 rd step: FOLLOW‐UP OUTLINING ACTIONS 2 nd step: RISK ASSESSMENT 1 st step: RISK IDENTIFICATION About the Integration Intimate Partner Violence Risk (article) • EIGE: Risk assessment and management • A guide to risk assessment and risk management of intimate partner violence against women for police • Sources Close x Materials (Click on the country)

Materials and recommendable reading INTEGRATION MODULE A printable pocket‐version Recommendable reading: of risk assessment

Materials and recommendable reading INTEGRATION MODULE A printable pocket‐version Recommendable reading: of risk assessment check list for frontline FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE • Istanbul Convention responders • Risk assessment by police of intimate France Germany Hungary RISK Slovenia Finland Portugal Scotland ASSESSMENT AND partner violence against women (presentation) Safe. Lives DASH risk Austria • The Influence of Victim Vulnerability and checklist CASE DOCUMENTATION Gender on Police Officers’ Assessment of Close x In Austria a risk assessment tool, ‘SALFAG 2’ has been developed within the framework of a pilot project by the Ministry of Interior. Its mandatory use was restricted on a trial basis mainly to the state Vorarlberg between 2013 Intimate Partner Violence Risk (article) and 2014. Since then it has continued to see discretionary use in this location. It was designed primarily for the use by prosecutors, and is therefore not specifically adapted to the needs of the police. In practice, it is EIGE: Risk assessment and management predominantly employed only after the police officer has left the location at which a case of DV occurred. IMPRODOVA training • • A guide to risk assessment and risk platform [link] In Austria, Child‐ and Victims Protection Groups are discretionally used as part of risk assessment in hospitals, management of intimate partner violence developed by national authorities and professionals (based on Campbell’s Danger Assessment 9) and adapted against women for police during the initiative “Living FREE of violence”. • Sources In Social Services, the Danger Assessment Dynamic Risk Analysis System (DYRIAS) Domestic Abuse Intervention Programs (DAIP) Module Close x Wrap‐up 4 th step: services 3 rd step: FOLLOW‐UP OUTLINING ACTIONS 2 nd step: RISK ASSESSMENT 1 st step: RISK IDENTIFICATION About the Integration (Click on the country) Materials Information about risk assessment processes within the EU:

Materials and recommendable reading INTEGRATION MODULE A printable pocket‐version Recommendable reading: of risk assessment

Materials and recommendable reading INTEGRATION MODULE A printable pocket‐version Recommendable reading: of risk assessment check list for frontline FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE • Istanbul Convention responders • Risk assessment by police of intimate France Germany Hungary RISK Slovenia Portugal Scotland Austria ASSESSMENT AND partner violence against women (presentation) Safe. Lives DASH risk Finland • The Influence of Victim Vulnerability and checklist CASE DOCUMENTATION Gender on Police Officers’ Assessment of Information about risk assessment processes within the EU: http: //julkaisut. valtioneuvosto. fi/bitstream/handle/10024/162012/STM_2019_55_Rap. pdf Module MARAK: (suomeksi) Intimate Partner Violence Risk (article) https: //thl. fi/fi/web/lapset‐nuoret‐ja‐perheet/tyon_tueksi/vakivallan‐ • EIGE: Risk assessment and management ehkaisy/lahisuhdevakivalta/marak IMPRODOVA training • A guide to risk assessment and risk platform [link] MARAC (in English) management of intimate partner violence https: //rikoksentorjunta. fi/en/marac against women for police • Sources Lähisuhdeväkivaltaan puuttumisen ja ehkäisyn prosessit (suomeksi) Wrap‐up 4 th step: services 3 rd step: FOLLOW‐UP OUTLINING ACTIONS 2 nd step: RISK ASSESSMENT 1 st step: RISK IDENTIFICATION About the Integration Close x Materials Close x (Click on the country)

Materials and recommendable reading INTEGRATION MODULE A printable pocket‐version Recommendable reading: of risk assessment

Materials and recommendable reading INTEGRATION MODULE A printable pocket‐version Recommendable reading: of risk assessment check list for frontline FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE • Istanbul Convention responders • Risk assessment by police of intimate Germany Hungary RISK Slovenia Finland Portugal Scotland Austria ASSESSMENT AND partner violence against women (presentation) Safe. Lives DASH risk France • The Influence of Victim Vulnerability and checklist CASE DOCUMENTATION Gender on Police Officers’ Assessment of Close x Module Intimate Partner Violence Risk (article) Close x • EIGE: Risk assessment and management IMPRODOVA training • A guide to risk assessment and risk platform [link] management of intimate partner violence In France, there is no formal, standardized risk assessment procedures designed for cases of DV in use by the police, the health sector or NGOs. against women for police • Sources Wrap‐up 4 th step: services 3 rd step: FOLLOW‐UP OUTLINING ACTIONS 2 nd step: RISK ASSESSMENT 1 st step: RISK IDENTIFICATION About the Integration (Click on the country) Materials Information about risk assessment processes within the EU:

Materials and recommendable reading INTEGRATION MODULE A printable pocket‐version Recommendable reading: of risk assessment

Materials and recommendable reading INTEGRATION MODULE A printable pocket‐version Recommendable reading: of risk assessment check list for frontline FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE • Istanbul Convention responders • Risk assessment by police of intimate France Slovenia Finland Hungary RISK Portugal Scotland Austria ASSESSMENT AND partner violence against women (presentation) Safe. Lives DASH risk Germany • The Influence of Victim Vulnerability and checklist CASE DOCUMENTATION Gender on Police Officers’ Assessment of Intimate Partner Violence Risk (article) • EIGE: Risk assessment and management In Germany, there is no formal, standardized risk assessment procedures designed for cases of IMPRODOVA training • A guide to risk assessment and risk DV in use by the police, the health sector or NGOs. platform [link] management of intimate partner violence against women for police • Sources Module Close x Materials (Click on the country) Wrap‐up 4 th step: services 3 rd step: FOLLOW‐UP OUTLINING ACTIONS 2 nd step: RISK ASSESSMENT 1 st step: RISK IDENTIFICATION About the Integration Close x Information about risk assessment processes within the EU:

Materials and recommendable reading Close x • Istanbul Convention • Risk assessment by police

Materials and recommendable reading Close x • Istanbul Convention • Risk assessment by police of intimate France Germany Finland Austria partner violence against women (presentation) Close x • The Influence of Victim Vulnerability and Hungary Gender on Police Officers’ Assessment of Intimate Partner Violence Risk (article) In Hungary, there is no formal, standardized risk assessment procedures designed for cases of • EIGE: Risk assessment and management DV in use by the police, the health sector. IMPRODOVA training • A guide to risk assessment and risk platform [link] A national assessment developed by professionals, psychologists, workers and experts of social management of intimate partner violence policy is in use for some social services. It is mandatorily used by the National Crisis Telephone against women for police Information Service. • Sources Module (Click on the country) Wrap‐up 4 th step: services 3 rd step: FOLLOW‐UP OUTLINING ACTIONS 2 nd step: RISK ASSESSMENT 1 st step: RISK IDENTIFICATION About the Integration Information about risk assessment processes within the EU: Materials Recommendable reading: INTEGRATION MODULE A printable pocket‐version of risk assessment check FORlist for frontline DOMESTIC VIOLENCE responders Slovenia Portugal Scotland RISK ASSESSMENT AND Safe. Lives DASH risk CASEchecklist DOCUMENTATION

Materials and recommendable reading INTEGRATION MODULE A printable pocket‐version Recommendable reading: of risk assessment

Materials and recommendable reading INTEGRATION MODULE A printable pocket‐version Recommendable reading: of risk assessment check list for frontline FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE • Istanbul Convention responders • Risk assessment by police of intimate France Germany Hungary RISKScotland Slovenia Finland Austria ASSESSMENT AND partner violence against women (presentation) Safe. Lives DASH risk • The Influence of Victim Vulnerability and Portugal checklist CASE DOCUMENTATION Gender on Police Officers’ Assessment of Close x • • In Portugal there is a DV risk assessment checklist, created as part of a project led by the Intimate Partner Violence Risk (article) Ministry of Interior and based on the review and implementation of the most frequent items of several risk assessment instruments, including DASH . The implementation process involved EIGE: Risk assessment and management reliability tests, pilot applications and an experimental test IMPRODOVA training phase. Since the tool’s A guide to risk assessment and risk implementation in 2013, its use has been mandatory for the police. platform [link] management of intimate partner violence against women for police In the health sector, they mandatorily use standardized, locally invented risk assessment tools, owned by the Ministry of Health. • Sources In the social sector, formalized tools are only in use at some places. The risk assessment tools are individually developed. Module Close x Wrap‐up 4 th step: services 3 rd step: FOLLOW‐UP OUTLINING ACTIONS 2 nd step: RISK ASSESSMENT 1 st step: RISK IDENTIFICATION About the Integration (Click on the country) Materials Information about risk assessment processes within the EU:

Materials and recommendable reading INTEGRATION MODULE A printable pocket‐version Recommendable reading: of risk assessment

Materials and recommendable reading INTEGRATION MODULE A printable pocket‐version Recommendable reading: of risk assessment check list for frontline FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE • Istanbul Convention responders • Risk assessment by police of intimate France Germany Hungary RISK Slovenia Finland Portugal Austria ASSESSMENT AND partner violence against women (presentation) Safe. Lives DASH risk • The Influence of Victim Vulnerability and Scotland checklist CASE DOCUMENTATION Gender on Police Officers’ Assessment of Close x Safe Lives: Resources for identifying the risk victims face https: //safelives. org. uk/practice‐ Intimate Partner Violence Risk (article) support/resources‐identifying‐risk‐victims‐face • EIGE: Risk assessment and management IMPRODOVA training • A guide to risk assessment and risk Risk assessment and interventions for victims of domestic abuse: consultation response platform [link] analysis, Scottish Government Safer Communities Directorate, 2019 management of intimate partner violence Analysis of responses to public consultation which sought views on how multi-agency risk against women for police assessment and working for victims of domestic abuse could best be improved. • Sources https: //www. gov. scot/publications/improving‐multi‐agency‐risk‐assessment‐interventions‐ victims‐domestic‐abuse‐analysis‐consultation‐responses/ Module Close x Wrap‐up 4 th step: services 3 rd step: FOLLOW‐UP OUTLINING ACTIONS 2 nd step: RISK ASSESSMENT 1 st step: RISK IDENTIFICATION About the Integration (Click on the country) Materials Information about risk assessment processes within the EU:

Materials and recommendable reading INTEGRATION MODULE A printable pocket‐version Recommendable reading: of risk assessment

Materials and recommendable reading INTEGRATION MODULE A printable pocket‐version Recommendable reading: of risk assessment check list for frontline FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE • Istanbul Convention responders • Risk assessment by police of intimate France Germany Hungary RISK Finland Portugal Scotland Austria ASSESSMENT AND partner violence against women (presentation) Safe. Lives DASH risk Slovenia • The Influence of Victim Vulnerability and checklist CASE DOCUMENTATION Gender on Police Officers’ Assessment of Close x Intimate Partner Violence Risk (article) https: //www. gov. si/teme/pravice‐zrtev‐kaznivih‐dejanj/ • EIGE: Risk assessment and management IMPRODOVA training https: //www. policija. si/svetujemo‐ozavescamo/oosebna‐varnost/418‐projekt‐policije‐za‐rtve‐ • A guide to risk assessment and risk platform [link] kaznivih‐dejanj management of intimate partner violence against women for police https: //www. dnevnik. si/1042911627 • Sources Module Close x Wrap‐up 4 th step: services 3 rd step: FOLLOW‐UP OUTLINING ACTIONS 2 nd step: RISK ASSESSMENT 1 st step: RISK IDENTIFICATION About the Integration (Click on the country) Materials Information about risk assessment processes within the EU:

Close x Case documentation of DV is an important procedure. Standardized risk assessment tools

Close x Case documentation of DV is an important procedure. Standardized risk assessment tools support frontline responders' work in documenting the case. INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE POLICE SOCIAL WORK HEALTH CARE RISK ASSESSMENT AND CASE DOCUMENTATION Document to the crime report Document to the citizen/client Document to the patient q A verbal description of all database injuries and other signs of q all identified risk factors violence q your overall assessment of the q your overall assessment of q all identified risk factors risk situation the risk situation q your overall assessment of q victim's own assessment of the risk situation his/her level of risk and fear of his/her level of risk and fear q victim's own assessment of being killed his/her level of risk and fear q case specific cooperation and q right diagnostic codes and of being killed communication with other FLR follow all defined registration q whenever possible e. g. procedures for DV situations After you have finished reading about the risk factors and photos of the injuries, other q photos of injuries and use of about the different approaches professionals have on risk photos, videos, message body scheme transcriptions identification, click the page of 2 nd step: RISK ASSESSMENT to see how all the risk factors are brought together for shared understanding. 1 st step: RISK IDENTIFICATION About the Integration Module 4 th step: services FOLLOW‐UP 3 rd step: OUTLINING ACTIONS 2 nd step: RISK ASSESSMENT Wrap‐up Materials Hint: Put the cursor over text to see more information about case documentation.

Close x INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE RISK ASSESSMENT AND CASE DOCUMENTATION SARA and

Close x INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE RISK ASSESSMENT AND CASE DOCUMENTATION SARA and B‐SAFER DA (Danger Module There are different kinds of risk assessment tools used by the frontline responders. Some organisations have developed their own tools. However, here you can see some of the most widely used risk assessment tools. Click on each tool to read a short description of it. Note: Appropriate use of these tools requires training. Assessment) DASH/MARAC 2 nd step: 1 st step: RISK ASSESSMENT RISK IDENTIFICATION About the Integration 4 th step: services FOLLOW‐UP 3 rd step: OUTLINING ACTIONS Wrap‐up Materials Risk assessment tools VRAG ODARA PATRIARCH

Close x Risk assessment tools INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE RISK ASSESSMENT AND CASE

Close x Risk assessment tools INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE RISK ASSESSMENT AND CASE DOCUMENTATION DASH risk assessment form includes questions about financial, psychological and physical violence and as well as threats. If a certain number of the risk indicators is met, the professional will refer the case to his/her local MARAC (Multi‐Agency Risk Assessment Conference). Scoring a certain number of points on the checklist is not an absolute requirement for referral to a MARAC since the professional may refer the case to a MARAC if s/he has concern for a victim. A third criterion for referral to a MARAC is the escalation of recent violence, which is measured in terms of the number of domestic disturbance calls made to the police over the last twelve months. A common practice is to submit a case to a MARAC if at least three domestic disturbance calls have been made within a single year. See also VS‐DASH 2009 – The Stalking Risk Identification Checklist https: //rikoksentorjunta. fi/en/marac Module DASH/MARAC The DASH risk assessment checklist is based on research of e. g. indicators of homicides. The form can be filled in by any public official (e. g. a police officer, a social worker, a nurse, a doctor, an NGO worker) who works with a victim of violence, however, training on this risk assessment tool should be undertaken before it is used. 2 nd step: 1 st step: RISK ASSESSMENT RISK IDENTIFICATION About the Integration 4 th step: services FOLLOW‐UP 3 rd step: OUTLINING ACTIONS Wrap‐up Materials Close x

Close x Risk assessment tools INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE RISK ASSESSMENT AND CASE

Close x Risk assessment tools INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE RISK ASSESSMENT AND CASE DOCUMENTATION Close x The VRAG is a 12‐item actuarial instrument that assesses the risk of violent recidivism among men apprehended for criminal violence. The recommended basis for scoring the VRAG for research and individual assessment is a comprehensive psychosocial history addressing childhood conduct, family background, antisocial and criminal behavior, psychological problems, and details of offenses. Adequate psychosocial histories include more than past and present psychiatric symptoms and rely on collateral information (i. e. , material gathered from friends, family, schools, correctional facilities, the police, and the courts). Scoring the VRAG is not a clinical task in its typical sense because it does not require contact between the assessor and the person being assessed. Nevertheless, compiling the required psychosocial history clearly is a clinical task, and expertise is required to score VRAG items from psychosocial histories. http: //criminal‐justice. iresearchnet. com/forensic‐psychology/violence‐risk‐ appraisal‐guide‐vrag/ Module The violence risk appraisal guide (VRAG) is an actuarial instrument. It assesses the risk of further violence among men or women who have already committed criminal violence. It is empirically supported actuarial method for the assessment of violence risk in forensic populations. 2 nd step: 1 st step: RISK ASSESSMENT RISK IDENTIFICATION About the Integration 4 th step: services FOLLOW‐UP 3 rd step: OUTLINING ACTIONS Wrap‐up Materials VRAG

Close x Risk assessment tools INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE RISK ASSESSMENT AND CASE

Close x Risk assessment tools INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE RISK ASSESSMENT AND CASE DOCUMENTATION Module 2 nd step: 1 st step: RISK ASSESSMENT RISK IDENTIFICATION About the Integration 4 th step: services FOLLOW‐UP 3 rd step: OUTLINING ACTIONS Wrap‐up Materials Close x VRAG The 12 VRAG items: (Note: The tool provides detailed coding instructions for each of these. ) The violence risk appraisal guide (VRAG) is an actuarial instrument. It assesses the risk of further violence among men or women who have already 1. Lived with both biological parents to age 16 (except for death of parent committed criminal violence. It is empirically supported actuarial method for 2. Elementary School Maladjustment the assessment of violence risk in forensic populations. 3. History of alcohol problem 4. Marital status (at the time of or prior to index offense) The VRAG is a 12‐item actuarial instrument that assesses the risk of violent 5. Criminal history score for nonviolent offenses prior to the index offense recidivism among men apprehended for criminal violence. The recommended 6. Failure on prior conditional release (includes parole or probation basis for scoring the VRAG for research and individual assessment is a violation or revocation, failure to comply, bail violation, and any new comprehensive psychosocial history addressing childhood conduct, family arrest while on conditional release) background, antisocial and criminal behavior, psychological problems, and 7. Age at index offense details of offenses. Adequate psychosocial histories include more than past 8. Victim Injury (for index offense; the most serious is scored) and present psychiatric symptoms and rely on collateral information (i. e. , 9. Any female victim (for index offense) material gathered from friends, family, schools, correctional facilities, the 10. Meets DSM criteria for any personality disorder (must be made by police, and the courts). Scoring the VRAG is not a clinical task in its typical appropriately licensed or certified professional) sense because it does not require contact between the assessor and the 11. Meets DSM criteria for schizophrenia (must be made by appropriately person being assessed. Nevertheless, compiling the required psychosocial licensed or certified professional) history clearly is a clinical task, and expertise is required to score VRAG items 12. a. Psychopathy Checklist score (if available, otherwise use item 12. b. from psychosocial histories. CATS score) http: //criminal‐justice. iresearchnet. com/forensic‐psychology/violence‐risk‐ 13. (Technically 12 b) b. CATS score (from the CATS worksheet) appraisal‐guide‐vrag/ http: //dustinkmacdonald. com/using‐violence‐risk‐appraisal‐guide‐vrag/

Close x Risk assessment tools INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE RISK ASSESSMENT AND CASE

Close x Risk assessment tools INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE RISK ASSESSMENT AND CASE DOCUMENTATION Close x DA (Danger Assessment) by Jacquelyn C. Campbell The Danger Assessment can be printed from http: //www. son. jhmi. edu/research/CNR/homicide/DANGER. htm, which also gives directions regarding permission for use. Module The tool can with some reliability identify women who may be at risk of being killed by their intimate partners. According to studies, almost half of the murdered women studied did not recognise the high level of their risk. Thus, risk assessment tools like the Danger Assessment may assist women and the professionals who help them to better understand the potential for danger and the level of their risk. Completing the Danger Assessment can help a woman evaluate the degree of danger she faces and consider what she should do next. Practitioners are reminded that the Danger Assessment is meant to be used with a calendar to enhance the accuracy of the assaulted woman’s recall of events. Read more: https: //www. ncjrs. gov/pdffiles 1/jr 000250 e. pdf 2 nd step: 1 st step: RISK ASSESSMENT RISK IDENTIFICATION About the Integration 4 th step: services FOLLOW‐UP 3 rd step: OUTLINING ACTIONS Wrap‐up Materials The series of 15 questions on the Danger Assessment is designed to measure a woman’s risk in an abusive relationship.

Close x Risk assessment tools INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE RISK ASSESSMENT AND CASE

Close x Risk assessment tools INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE RISK ASSESSMENT AND CASE DOCUMENTATION Slapping, pushing; no injuries and/or lasting pain Punching, kicking; bruises, cuts, and/or continuing pain 'Beating up'; severe contusions, burns, broken bones Threat to use a weapon; head injury, internal injury, permanent injury Use of a weapon; wounds from a weapon A. Has the physical violence increased in frequency over the past year? B. Has the physical violence increased in severity over the past year and/or has a weapon or threat from a weapon ever been used? C. Does he ever try to choke you? D. Is there a gun in the house? E. Has he ever forced you to have sex when you did not wish to do so? F. Does he use drugs? By drugs, I mean 'uppers' or amphetamines, speed, angel dust, cocaine, 'crack', street drugs, or mixtures. G. Does he threaten to kill you and/or do you believe he is capable of killing you? H. Is he drunk every day or almost every day? I. Does he control most or all of your daily activities? For instance: does he tell you who you can be friends with, how much money you can take when shopping, or when you can take the car? J. Have you ever been beaten by him while you were pregnant? K. Is he violently and constantly jealous of you? (For instance, does he say 'If I can’t have you, no one can. '? ) L. Have you ever threatened or tried to commit suicide? M. Has he ever threatened or tried to commit suicide? N. Is he violent toward your children? O. Is he violent outside of the home? Module 4 th step: services FOLLOW‐UP 3 rd step: OUTLINING ACTIONS Wrap‐up Materials 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Close x 2 nd step: 1 st step: RISK ASSESSMENT RISK IDENTIFICATION About the Integration DANGER ASSESSMENT QUESTIONS

Close x Risk assessment tools INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE RISK ASSESSMENT AND CASE

Close x Risk assessment tools INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE RISK ASSESSMENT AND CASE DOCUMENTATION The PATRIARCH assessment tool is a victim‐focused checklist. It is based on the structured professional judgement approach to assess the risk of honour -based violence and forced marriage. The tool is comprised of 10 risk factors and five victim vulnerability factors. Its goal is safety planning. Proper use of the PATRIARCH risk assessment tool requires specialised education and training. http: //www. rpksundsvall. se/wp‐content/uploads/2009/05/PATRIARCH‐ 4. pdf Module PATRIARCH 2 nd step: 1 st step: RISK ASSESSMENT RISK IDENTIFICATION Aboutthe Integration 4 th step: services FOLLOW‐UP 3 rd step: OUTLINING ACTIONS Wrap‐up Materials Close x

Close x Risk assessment tools INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE RISK ASSESSMENT AND CASE

Close x Risk assessment tools INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE RISK ASSESSMENT AND CASE DOCUMENTATION The victim's vulnerability factors: 11. Inconsistent behaviour and/or attitude toward the family/perpetrator 12. Extreme fear of the family/perpetrator 13. Inadequate access to resources 14. An unsafe living situation 15. Personal problems that may influence management strategies Module Risk factors that are related to the person(s) who threaten(s): 1. Serious violent threats or thoughts 2. Violent acts 3. Honour‐related violence 4. Arranged marriages or engagements 5. Escalation 6. Attitudes that support honour‐related violence 7. High degree of insult 8. Origin from an area with known sub‐cultural values supporting honour‐ related violence, forced marriages or genital mutilation 9. Lack of cultural integration 10. Psychosocial problems 2 nd step: 1 st step: RISK ASSESSMENT RISK IDENTIFICATION About the Integration 4 th step: services FOLLOW‐UP 3 rd step: OUTLINING ACTIONS Wrap‐up Materials Close x

Close x Risk assessment tools INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE RISK ASSESSMENT AND CASE

Close x Risk assessment tools INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE RISK ASSESSMENT AND CASE DOCUMENTATION The ODARA is considered simple to use and can be used by a wide range of service providers e. g. police officers, shelter workers, victim services workers, health care professionals and social workers. It can be used in safety planning with the victims. The use of such a tool allows service providers from a wide variety of backgrounds to share a common language when talking about risk. ODARA training has improved scoring accuracy. http: //grcounseling. com/wp‐content/uploads/2016/08/domestic‐violence‐ risk‐assessment. pdf https: //pathssk. org/wp‐content/uploads/2017/02/06‐b‐ODARA‐ Waypoint. pdf Module ODARA The ODARA is an actuarial risk assessment tool that calculates whether a man who assaulted his female partner, will repeat it in the future. The 13 ODARA items include domestic and non‐domestic criminal history, threats and confinement during the index incident, children in the relationship, substance abuse, and barriers to victim support. Each is scored 0 or 1 and the total score is simply the sum of the items. 2 nd step: 1 st step: RISK ASSESSMENT RISK IDENTIFICATION About the Integration 4 th step: services FOLLOW‐UP 3 rd step: OUTLINING ACTIONS Wrap‐up Materials Close x

Close x Risk assessment tools INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE RISK ASSESSMENT AND CASE

Close x Risk assessment tools INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE RISK ASSESSMENT AND CASE DOCUMENTATION 4 th step: services FOLLOW‐UP 3 rd step: OUTLINING ACTIONS Wrap‐up Materials 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. Prior domestic assault (against a partner or the children) in police records Prior non‐domestic assault (against any person other than a partner or the children) in police records Prior sentence for a term of 30 days or more Failure on prior conditional release; bail, parole, probation, no‐contact order Threat to harm or kill anyone during the index incident Confinement of the victim during the index incident Victim fears (is concerned about) future assault More than one child altogether Victim has a biological child from a previous partner Violence against others (toward any person other than a partner or the children) More than one indicator of a substance abuse problem: alcohol at index, drugs at index, prior drugs or alcohol, increased drugs or alcohol, more angry or violent, prior offence, alcohol problem, drug problem Assault on the victim when she was pregnant Victim faces at least one barrier to support: children, no phone, no access to transportation, geographical isolation, alcohol/drug consumption or problem Module 1. Close x 2 nd step: 1 st step: RISK ASSESSMENT RISK IDENTIFICATION About the Integration The ODARA items:

Close x Risk assessment tools INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE RISK ASSESSMENT AND CASE

Close x Risk assessment tools INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE RISK ASSESSMENT AND CASE DOCUMENTATION Close x https: //www. unb. ca/saintjohn/ccjs/_resources/pdf/ipvrisktoolsynopsis 2013. pdf Module The B‐SAFER is a condensed version of SARA. It is a structured risk assessment instrument designed to identify persons who are at risk from intimate partner violence. B‐SAFER is constructed specifically for police officer use because of their role as frontline responders in domestic abuse incidents. SARA has been considered time‐consuming for police officers to complete. Therefore SARA's 20 items were reduced to 10 items in the B‐ SAFER. The B‐SAFER 10 items are divided into two subsections: Perpetrator Risk Factors (items 1‐ 5) and Psychosocial Adjustment (items 6‐ 10). Each subsection has an option to note an additional risk consideration that the assessor believes may be important to a particular case. The purpose of B‐SAFER is to "guide and structure an assessor’s decision‐ making regarding a perpetrator’s future intimate partner violence risk through evaluation of risk factors that are empirically associated with spousal violence". 2 nd step: 1 st step: RISK ASSESSMENT RISK IDENTIFICATION About the Integration 4 th step: services FOLLOW‐UP 3 rd step: OUTLINING ACTIONS Wrap‐up Materials SARA (Spousal Assault Risk Assessment) and B‐SAFER (Brief Spousal Assault Form for the Evaluation of Risk)

Close x Risk assessment tools INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE RISK ASSESSMENT AND CASE

Close x Risk assessment tools INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE RISK ASSESSMENT AND CASE DOCUMENTATION Close x Violent acts Violent threats or thoughts Escalation Violation of court orders Violent attitudes General criminality Intimate relationship problems Employments problems Substance use problems Mental health problems For a more detailed description, please see: https: //www. unb. ca/saintjohn/ccjs/_resources/pdf/ipvrisktoolsynopsis 2013. pdf Module 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 2 nd step: 1 st step: RISK ASSESSMENT RISK IDENTIFICATION About the Integration 4 th step: services FOLLOW‐UP 3 rd step: OUTLINING ACTIONS Wrap‐up Materials 10 items of B‐SAFER:

Recognise high risk moments and triggers for increasing risk INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE

Recognise high risk moments and triggers for increasing risk INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE RISK ASSESSMENT AND CASE DOCUMENTATION q The perpetrator realizes q A previously violent perpetrator wants to meet that the situation was "one last time" reported to police q a restraining order q The perpetrator is released q The perpetrator discovers the new address of the q a divorce/obligation to from custody victim share assets q The perpetrator is being q a negative residence charged permit q Trial is scheduled/occurred q The victim declares q different than desired child q Lead‐up to a trial intention of custody decision/child q Sentence reading is leaving/separation contact arrangements scheduled/occurred q The victim attempts to q Release from a prison leave for separation sentence q The victim starts a new q Expiry of a court order relationship Perpetrator is given a (court) decision of Module 4 th step: services FOLLOW‐UP 3 rd step: OUTLINING ACTIONS Wrap‐up Materials Be aware of high risk moments and triggers for increasing risk. Agencies should be aware of the need for additional safety planning and support for victims around events that may contribute to risk. 2 nd step: 1 st step: RISK ASSESSMENT RISK IDENTIFICATION Aboutthe Integration Close x

Close x General Guidelines INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE RISK ASSESSMENT AND CASE DOCUMENTATION

Close x General Guidelines INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE RISK ASSESSMENT AND CASE DOCUMENTATION PROSECUTOR AND COURT SOCIAL WORK, HOUSING HEALTH CARE NGO: s, EDUCATION, OTHER ACTORS q. Collect as much information as possible about the identified risk factors q. Risk assessment needs to address both adult and child victims q. Risk assessment should be done with the victim, not to her/him q. Ideally, with the consent of the victim, information is shared e. g. with the police, prosecutor, social work, health care sector and relevant NGOs q. Assess the immediate risks to the safety of the client/patient or any children q. Use your national/local risk assessment tool to assess the risks and ask for training q. In case you can not access national/local risk assessment tools, use internationally accepted risk assessment tools and ask for training. You find tools under "Risk assessment tools" q. If possible, also assess the risk based on the information you have about the perpetrator (for example as a probation officer, prosecutor or prison employees) Module 4 th step: services FOLLOW‐UP 3 rd step: OUTLINING ACTIONS Wrap‐up Materials POLICE 2 nd step: 1 st step: RISK ASSESSMENT RISK IDENTIFICATION About the Integration Below you can see general guidelines for risk assessment. These guidelines are for all frontline responders.

INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE RISK ASSESSMENT AND They may have access to people's

INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE RISK ASSESSMENT AND They may have access to people's homes where they can observe people's life situations, relationships, resources and health problems. CASE They are likely be the gatekeepers who identify the DOCUMENTATION problem and assist the victim and the perpetrator in receiving help. The frontline responders (FLR) are the key players in the risk assessment process. The police officers, social workers, doctors, nurses, paramedics, NGO workers and educators are to the professionals who most often encounter a victim of domestic violence for the first time. Identification of risk factors already during the first contact with the victim is important in order to have a holistic approach to risk assessment and risk management. Reacting in time may save a life. 1 st step: RISK IDENTIFICATION About the Integration Module 4 th step: services FOLLOW‐UP 3 rd step: OUTLINING ACTIONS 2 nd step: RISK ASSESSMENT Wrap‐up Materials Close x

Let's wrap this up. Click on each box to see what happens in each

Let's wrap this up. Click on each box to see what happens in each step of the risk assessment process: INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE Risk related Victim's RISK ASSESSMENT AND information to Critical DV risk vulnerability check by each factors professional DOCUMENTATION CASE 2 nd step: Risk Assessment 3 rd step: Outlining the actions 4 th step: Follow‐up Click on each box to see more • The identified risk factors must also be documented carefully in order to support the work of the next frontline responder or a colleague who is in charge of risk assessment • Risk assessment checklists support the work of the FRL. You can print your own checklist from the 'Materials' page. Module Materials 1 st step: Risk identification Wrap‐up 4 th step: services 3 rd step: FOLLOW‐UP OUTLINING ACTIONS 2 nd step: RISK ASSESSMENT 1 st step: RISK IDENTIFICATION About the Integration Close x 1 st step: Risk identification • When a frontline responder (FLR) meets a potential victim of domestic violence, s/he collects as much information as possible about the risk factors, which are:

Let's wrap this up. Click on each box to see what happens in each

Let's wrap this up. Click on each box to see what happens in each step of the risk assessment process: 3 rd step: Outline the actions 4 th step: Follow‐up • • • Close x • There are many risk assessment tools to support FLRs' work. However, appropriate use of the tools requires training. We recommend FLRs combine the use of a risk assessment tool, their own professional judgment, and the victim's own risk prediction Module 2 nd step: Risk Assessment INTEGRATION MODULE After identification of risk factors, the level of risk must be FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE assessed With multi‐agency cooperation the result of risk assessment is comprehensive. RISK ASSESSMENT AND Knowing the level of risk (low, medium, high) does not help the victim but it helps frontline responders (FLR) to CASE DOCUMENTATION determine what measures need to be taken. 2 nd step: Risk Assessment Wrap‐up 4 th step: services 3 rd step: FOLLOW‐UP OUTLINING ACTIONS 2 nd step: RISK ASSESSMENT 1 st step: RISK IDENTIFICATION About the Integration Materials 1 st step: Risk identification

Let's wrap this up. Click on each box to see what happens in each

Let's wrap this up. Click on each box to see what happens in each step of the risk assessment process: 4 th step: Follow‐up • • The safety plan should be carried out in consultation with other agencies: for example, social services, housing services, NGOs and children’s services. • Holistic risk management requires multi‐agency collaboration. Module 2 nd step: Risk Assessment Wrap‐up 4 th step: services 3 rd step: FOLLOW‐UP OUTLINING ACTIONS 2 nd step: RISK ASSESSMENT 1 st step: RISK IDENTIFICATION About the Integration Materials • 3 rd step: Outline the actions INTEGRATION MODULE 3 rd step: Outlining necessary actions FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE After risk assessment, the frontline responders need to outline necessary actions to support the victim and to RISK ASSESSMENT AND implement safety measures. The best result is achieved by multi‐agency cooperation. The police help in developing and supporting safety plans CASE DOCUMENTATION as part of the risk management process. Close x 1 st step: Risk identification

Let's wrap this up. Click on each box to see what happens in each

Let's wrap this up. Click on each box to see what happens in each step of the risk assessment process: • If the situation gets worse or if the threat of violence continues, the risk assessment needs to be revised and new measures need to be considered. 4 th step: Follow‐up Last but not at least: Take a look in the Materials page. Print a pocket version checklist for risk assessment and find more information about risk assessment. Module 3 rd step: Outline the actions • Wrap‐up 4 th step: services 3 rd step: FOLLOW‐UP OUTLINING ACTIONS 2 nd step: RISK ASSESSMENT 1 st step: RISK IDENTIFICATION About the Integration Materials 2 nd step: Risk Assessment INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE 4 th step: Follow-up RISK ASSESSMENT AND There should be a clear understanding among the frontline responders in relation to the party responsible for staying in contact with the victim or monitoring the situation CASE DOCUMENTATION Close x 1 st step: Risk identification

Let's wrap this up. Click on each box to see what happens in each

Let's wrap this up. Click on each box to see what happens in each step of the risk assessment process: INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE Victim's Risk related RISK ASSESSMENT AND information to check vulnerability factors by each professional CASE DOCUMENTATION Close x 3 rd step: Outline the actions 4 th step: Follow‐up When a frontline responder (FLR) meets a potential victim of domestic violence, s/he collects as much information as possible about the risk factors, which are: Critical DV risk factors Close x The perpetrator is q substance abuse issues q using violence more frequently q threatened to kill a victim q using more intensive (harmful, injurious) Click on each box to see more violence q used physical violence q controlling but also dependent on victim q used psychological, economic, sexual or • Risk assessment check lists support the work of the FRL digital violence The perpetrator has q used coercive control q strangled the victim • Identified risk factors must be documented q stalked the victim; online abuse and digital stalking are increasingly used to abuse and The victim is exert control q planning a divorce or separation q experienced negative life changes q pregnant or has a baby q mental health issues (e. g. suicidal ideation) Module 2 nd step: Risk Assessment • 1 st step: Risk identification Wrap‐up 4 th step: services 3 rd step: FOLLOW‐UP OUTLINING ACTIONS 2 nd step: RISK ASSESSMENT 1 st step: RISK IDENTIFICATION About the Integration Materials 1 st step: Risk identification

Let's wrap this up. Click on each box to see what happens in each

Let's wrap this up. Click on each box to see what happens in each step of risk assessment process: INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE Victim's RISK ASSESSMENT AND Risk related vulnerability information to check factors by each professional CASE DOCUMENTATION Close x 3 rd step: Outline the actions 4 th step: Follow‐up When a frontline responder (FLR) meets a potential victim of domestic violence, s/he collects as much information as possible about the risk factors, which are: Critical DV risk factors Close x POLICE SOCIAL WORK/NGO/EDUCATION HEALTH CARE The perpetrator has The victim q Signs of substance or non‐ Click on each box to see more q access to firearms substance addictive behaviour q has symptoms of q used a weapon in the strangulation including co‐addiction of a most recent event • Risk assessment check lists support the work of the FRL q has prior injuries caused family member q previous criminal record q Signs of conflict behaviour that by trauma • Identified risk factors must be documented entries q is not allowed to see the may lead to potential q previously violated nurse/doctor alone escalation of conflict restraining order q Victim is not allowed to meet the social worker alone q Signs of child mistreatment in family Module 2 nd step: Risk Assessment • 1 st step: Risk identification Wrap‐up 4 th step: services 3 rd step: FOLLOW‐UP OUTLINING ACTIONS 2 nd step: RISK ASSESSMENT 1 st step: RISK IDENTIFICATION About the Integration Materials 1 st step: Risk identification

Let's wrap this up. Click on each box to see what happens in each

Let's wrap this up. Click on each box to see what happens in each step of risk assessment process: 3 rd step: Outline the actions 4 th step: Follow‐up When a frontline responder (FLR) meets a potential victim of domestic violence, s/he collects as much information as possible about the risk factors, which are: Critical DV risk factors Close x The victim experiences q strong fear q social isolation q is an elderly person q mental health issues q is a disabled person Click on each box to see more q substance abuse issues q is dependent on the perpetrator q is an immigrant or a refugee Risk assessment check lists support the work of the FRL The family or community of a victim or a q • is a minor perpetrator is justifying violence based on q is a homeless person • Identified risk factors must be documented q honour/culture/religion q is an illiterate person q belongs to a sexual or gender minority q belongs to an ethnic minority The victim Module 2 nd step: Risk Assessment • INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE Risk related Victim's RISK ASSESSMENT AND information to check vulnerability by each professional factors CASE DOCUMENTATION 1 st step: Risk identification Wrap‐up 4 th step: services 3 rd step: FOLLOW‐UP OUTLINING ACTIONS 2 nd step: RISK ASSESSMENT 1 st step: RISK IDENTIFICATION About the Integration Materials 1 st step: Risk identification Close x

Let's wrap this up. Click on each box to see what happens in each

Let's wrap this up. Click on each box to see what happens in each step of risk assessment process: 3 rd step: Outline the actions 4 th step: Follow‐up Document to the citizen/client database q all identified risk factors q your overall assessment of the risk situation q victim's own assessment of his/her level of risk and fear of being killed Click on each box to see more q case specific cooperation and communication with other FLR Education • Identified risk factors must also be documented carefully Document to the patient database Healthin order to support the work of the next frontline q all identified risk factors care responder or the colleague who is in charge of risk q your overall assessment of the risk situation assessment q victim's own assessment of his/her level of risk and fear of being • killed q right diagnostic codes and follow all defined registration Risk assessment checklists support the work of the FRL. procedures for DV situations q photos of injuries and use of body scheme You can print your own checklist from 'Materials' page. Module 2 nd step: Risk Assessment INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE Profession ASSESSMENT Victim's RISK AND Common DV Social specific risk vulnerability risk factors work/ factors CASE DOCUMENTATION NGO/ Wrap‐up 4 th step: services 3 rd step: FOLLOW‐UP OUTLINING ACTIONS 2 nd step: RISK ASSESSMENT 1 st step: RISK IDENTIFICATION Aboutthe Integration Materials 1 st step: Risk identification Close x 1 st step: Risk identification Document to the crime report Police Close x q all identified risk factors • When a frontline responder (FLR) meets a potential victim q description of all injuries and other signs of violence (whenever of domestic violence, s/he collects as much information as possible, use e. g. photos, videos, message transcriptions) q evidence of coercive control possible about the risk factors, which are: q your overall assessment of the risk situation q victim's own assessment of his/her level of risk and fear of being killed

Close x q Inform the victim about shelters and guide the victim to a

Close x q Inform the victim about shelters and guide the victim to a shelter if needed q Initiate child protection procedures if not done yet. q File a crime report if not done yet q Include the risk assessment information in the report q Inform the victim about a restraining order or issue a temporary restraining order q Inform the victim when the perpetrator will be released from custody* q Create a safety plan for the victim q Make sure the relevant NGOs are invited to participate in the risk assessment process q Assist the victim in protecting her/his personal data q Assist the perpetrator in joining a perpetrator programme* * = if this duty does not belong to an another agency INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE RISK ASSESSMENT AND CASE DOCUMENTATION Social work, q If there is an immediate risk to the safety of the client or any children, consider contacting the police. NGOs q Initiate child protection procedures if not done yet. q Inform the victim about shelters and guide the victim to a shelter if needed q Help the victim to solve financial problems q Secure safe housing for the victim q Assist the victim in protecting her/his personal data q Assist the victim in getting immediate crisis help and psychosocial support Health care, q Assist the victim in receiving immediate crisis help and psychosocial support q If there is an immediate risk to safety of the patient or any children, consider education contacting the police. q Initiate child protection procedures if not done yet. 3 rd step: 2 nd step: OUTLINING ACTIONS 1 st step: RISK ASSESSMENT RISK IDENTIFICATION About the Integration Module 4 th step: services FOLLOW‐UP Wrap‐up Materials Police

Close x INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE RISK ASSESSMENT AND CASE DOCUMENTATION Effective multi-sectoral

Close x INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE RISK ASSESSMENT AND CASE DOCUMENTATION Effective multi-sectoral and multi-agency interventions require that all policy sectors and actors are engaged and accountable, namely law enforcement, the judiciary, health, social welfare and child services, employment, education, and general and specialised services for victims. Extensive research and evaluation of existing co-ordinated interventions also demonstrate the importance of involving – in addition to sectoral stakeholders - autonomous victims’ rights advocates and other relevant NGOs working in the field of violence against women. Developing a shared understanding of violence against women, as well as improving information-sharing and risk assessment through the development of common standards, guidelines and protocols can greatly contribute toward the pooling of valuable resources and establishing systematic co-operation. Such tools are also instrumental in securing the active commitment of all stakeholders. From: Andrea Krizsan, Eniko Pap, Implementing a Comprehensive and Co‐ ordinated Approach: An assessment of Poland’s response to prevent and combat gender‐based violence (Council of Europe, 2016), page 12 https: //rm. coe. int/168064 ecd 8 3 rd step: 2 nd step: OUTLINING ACTIONS 1 st step: RISK ASSESSMENT RISK IDENTIFICATION About the Integration Module 4 th step: services FOLLOW‐UP Wrap‐up Materials WHY WE NEED A STRONG CO‐OPERATION NETWORK

Nora is a 34‐year‐old woman with an immigrant background. She has lived here in

Nora is a 34‐year‐old woman with an immigrant background. She has lived here in your country for three years with her parents and sisters. Nora married Peter two years ago. Peter is the son of a family friend of Nora's parents. Nora's family comes from a patriarchal culture where the community comes before the individual. INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE RISK ASSESSMENT AND CASE DOCUMENTATION Click to continue… 1 st step: RISK IDENTIFICATION About the Integration Module 4 th step: services FOLLOW‐UP 3 rd step: OUTLINING ACTIONS 2 nd step: RISK ASSESSMENT Wrap‐up Materials Close x

Nora's marriage with Peter was a relief for Nora's family since in their culture

Nora's marriage with Peter was a relief for Nora's family since in their culture a woman at Nora's age should not be single. However, quite soon after Nora and Peter got married, Peter started to control her everyday behaviour. Peter does not let Nora see her friends or go anywhere without him. A mandatory language course is the only place where Nora can go alone. INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE RISK ASSESSMENT AND Peter takes away Nora's debit card and takes loans under her name. When Nora tries to resist, Peter turns violent and CASE DOCUMENTATION abuses her. Peter threatens to send Nora back to her home country. Click to continue… 1 st step: RISK IDENTIFICATION About the Integration Module 4 th step: services FOLLOW‐UP 3 rd step: OUTLINING ACTIONS 2 nd step: RISK ASSESSMENT Wrap‐up Materials Close x

Close x INTEGRATION MODULE At the same time Peter spreads rumours about Nora's FOR

Close x INTEGRATION MODULE At the same time Peter spreads rumours about Nora's FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE immorality in order to justify the claims of his violent actions to their community. The rumours humiliate Nora's family. RISK ASSESSMENT The community pressures Nora's mother and her sisters' AND families to clear their name. CASE DOCUMENTATION Nora's mother begs Nora to stay with Peter to calm the situation and her sisters ask her not to bother their mother with the issue any more. Nora feels that she is responsible for the violence and her family's reputation, and accepts that divorcing Peter is out of the question. Click to continue… 1 st step: RISK IDENTIFICATION About the Integration Module 4 th step: services FOLLOW‐UP 3 rd step: OUTLINING ACTIONS 2 nd step: RISK ASSESSMENT Wrap‐up Materials Nora discloses the situation to her parents, asking for help. First, the parents take Peter's violent behaviour seriously, but suddenly Nora's father passes away. Nora's grieving mother is not capable of standing against Peter's will on her own.

INTEGRATION MODULE Over time, the violence gets more serious and more frequent. On one

INTEGRATION MODULE Over time, the violence gets more serious and more frequent. On one occasion, Peter strangles Nora for so long DOMESTIC VIOLENCE that FOR she loses consciousness. After the strangulation she starts to have speech impairment issues especially in stressful situations. Nora feels isolated, helpless and AND RISK ASSESSMENT depressed. Peter CASE has threatened DOCUMENTATION to share some private pictures of Nora in public if Nora 'ruins his reputations as a husband', as he puts it. Nora feels anxious since she can not talk to anyone ‐ even her family ‐ about her feelings. . Click to continue… 1 st step: RISK IDENTIFICATION About the Integration Module 4 th step: services FOLLOW‐UP 3 rd step: OUTLINING ACTIONS 2 nd step: RISK ASSESSMENT Wrap‐up Materials Close x

INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE RISK ASSESSMENT AND CASE DOCUMENTATION The NGO worker meets

INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE RISK ASSESSMENT AND CASE DOCUMENTATION The NGO worker meets Nora at the school after the One day Nora finds a phone number of an NGO that helps immigrant women. The phone service is also in Nora's native language. Nora calls the service phone anonymously to ask for legal advice about what happens to her residence permit in the case of a divorce. The NGO worker asks Nora about her life situation. Nora discloses her difficult situation and anxiety. language course since it is the only place where Nora can go alone. With Nora's consent the NGO worker contacts the police and a responsible social service worker. . Click to continue… 1 st step: RISK IDENTIFICATION About the Integration Module 4 th step: services FOLLOW‐UP 3 rd step: OUTLINING ACTIONS 2 nd step: RISK ASSESSMENT Wrap‐up Materials Close x

Close x This was the story of Nora. Take one minute to think of

Close x This was the story of Nora. Take one minute to think of the following questions: INTEGRATION MODULE Ø Which situations described in the story you consider FOR but DOMESTIC VIOLENCE unfortunate not your business as a frontline responder? RISK ASSESSMENT AND There may be some risk factors that do not concern your profession. However, identifying and documenting also CASE DOCUMENTATION these risk factors is important in order to have a comprehensive understanding of the sources of risks. This is needed in the phase of risk management. st Ø Now, go back to the main . page of the 1 step: RISK IDENTIFICATION and read more about the identification and documentation of risk factors. Click to go back to main page of the 1 st step: RISK IDENTIFICATION… 1 st step: RISK IDENTIFICATION About the Integration Module 4 th step: services FOLLOW‐UP 3 rd step: OUTLINING ACTIONS 2 nd step: RISK ASSESSMENT Wrap‐up Materials Ø Which acts, situations or conditions endanger Nora?

Close x INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE In order to enable constructive and smooth

Close x INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE In order to enable constructive and smooth co‐operation between different agencies, the legislation should be clear and every partner RISK ASSESSMENT AND should understand their roles and responsibilities. CASE DOCUMENTATION Click to continue… Module Ø Do you know, in which situation you can share and exchange information with other agencies? 2 nd step: 1 st step: RISK ASSESSMENT RISK IDENTIFICATION About the Integration 4 th step: services FOLLOW‐UP 3 rd step: OUTLINING ACTIONS Wrap‐up Materials After Nora has disclosed her situation to the NGO worker, the NGO worker contacts the police and a responsible social service worker with the consent of Nora.

INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE RISK ASSESSMENT AND CASE DOCUMENTATION Click to continue… Module

INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE RISK ASSESSMENT AND CASE DOCUMENTATION Click to continue… Module In some EU‐countries the legislation allows the professionals to share and exchange information for more comprehensive risk assessment, if it is necessary to protect a child, to prevent a violent act or if the victim has given her consent. In some EU‐countries however there is no legislative support in relation to information exchange between the police, social work or health care sectors. Hence, multi‐agency mechanisms within the EU range from the adoption of formal or informal referral mechanisms to the presence of multidisciplinary teams or conferences, that are mandated by legislation or by policy documentation on risk assessment. 2 nd step: 1 st step: RISK ASSESSMENT RISK IDENTIFICATION About the Integration 4 th step: services FOLLOW‐UP 3 rd step: OUTLINING ACTIONS Wrap‐up Materials Close x

INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE RISK ASSESSMENT AND The next example of how Nora's

INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE RISK ASSESSMENT AND The next example of how Nora's case is brought into the multi‐ agency risk assessment process is based on the requirements of the CASE DOCUMENTATION Istanbul Convention. This may differ from your national legislation. Module The Istanbul Convention requires the State parties to take the necessary legislative or other measures to ensure that an assessment of the lethality risk, the seriousness of the situation and the risk of repeated violence is carried out by all relevant authorities in order to manage the risk and if necessary to provide co‐ordinated safety and support. 2 nd step: 1 st step: RISK ASSESSMENT RISK IDENTIFICATION About the Integration 4 th step: services FOLLOW‐UP 3 rd step: OUTLINING ACTIONS Wrap‐up Materials Close x Click to continue…

Close x With the consent of Nora, the police, the social service worker, the

Close x With the consent of Nora, the police, the social service worker, the NGO worker and a representative of the health care sector participate in a risk assessment conference. INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE RISK ASSESSMENT AND CASE DOCUMENTATION NGO worker q Nora has divulged in the meetings with the NGO worker that it is unlikely that her family will approve her divorce from Peter q Nora's mother and sisters think that Nora should stay with Peter to control the rumours in the community. They seem to blame Nora for the badmouthing within their community. Nora's case What is missing? Let's listen to Nora as well! Click to continue… Social service worker: q Nora is isolated q There are signs of coercive control q It seems that Peter has taken several loans under Nora's name Representative of health care sector: q According to the patient's database, Nora has been in ER three times earlier this year due to external traumas and twice last year q Lately Peter has accompanied Nora when visiting the doctor since Nora's speech impairment prevents her from making herself understood correctly q The cause for Nora's adulthood speech impairment is not recorded in the patient's database Module Police: q Peter has previously been violent q Peter has previously violated a restraining order q Peter has previously used a gun in a robbery 2 nd step: 1 st step: RISK ASSESSMENT RISK IDENTIFICATION Aboutthe Integration 4 th step: services FOLLOW‐UP 3 rd step: OUTLINING ACTIONS Wrap‐up Materials Look at the boxes to see what kind of information can be collected by multi‐agency co‐operation:

Close x With the consent of Nora, the police, the social service worker, the

Close x With the consent of Nora, the police, the social service worker, the NGO worker and a representative of health care sector participate in the risk assessment conference. INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE RISK ASSESSMENT AND CASE DOCUMENTATION Click to continue… Module Police: Social. Close x worker: q Peter has previously been violent q Nora is isolated q Peter has violated a restraining q There are signs of coercive control order If Nora is asked about her situation, she may tell us this: q It seems that Peter has taken q Peter has previously used a gun q Her speech issues developed four months ago after Peter had strangled her several loans with Nora's name in a robbery q She fears that Peter will kill her if she separate from him Nora's q She is worried that her residence permit will be cancelled if she separates; this is case what Peter has told her q She is worried that the police won't believe her since she is an immigrant but Representative of health care sector: NGO worker Peter has the nationality of this country q According to patient's database Nora q Nora has told in the meetings q Peter has told that he will publish private sexual pictures of her if she tells anyone has been in ER three times earlier this with NGO worker that it is not about the violence or tries to leave him year due external traumas and two likely that her family will q Peter has said that he will make sure that no decent man will ever even look at times last year approve her divorce from Peter Nora if she separates from Peter. q Lately Peter has accompanied Nora q Nora's mother and sisters think Who's missing? when visiting the doctor since Nora's that Nora should stay with Peter Click on this box speech impairment prevents her to to control the rumours in the to see the make herself understood right community. They seem to blame answer. q The cause for Nora's adulthood speech Nora for the badmouthing in impairment is not recorded in patient's their community. database 2 nd step: 1 st step: RISK ASSESSMENT RISK IDENTIFICATION About the Integration 4 th step: services FOLLOW‐UP 3 rd step: OUTLINING ACTIONS Wrap‐up Materials Look at the boxes to see what kind of information can be collected by multi‐agency cooperation:

The identified risk factors Close x INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE RISK ASSESSMENT AND

The identified risk factors Close x INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE RISK ASSESSMENT AND CASE DOCUMENTATION Peter is Nora ü using violence more frequently ü is planning a divorce ü using more intensive (harmful, injurious) ü has an immigrant background violence ü has prior injuries caused by trauma ü is not allowed to see the doctor alone Peter has ü strangled Nora experiences ü used coercive control ü strong fear ü used physical violence ü social isolation ü used economic and psychological ü mental health issues violence ü access to firearms The community of Nora and Peter is ü previous criminal record entries justifying violence by ü previously violated a restraining order ü honour Click here to go back to the main page of 2 nd step: RISK ASSESSMENT Module A calculation of the probability of becoming a victim of serious violence does not help the victim, but the calculation and the frontline responders' own judgment of the situation support the frontline responders in taking necessary action to protect the victim, and to prevent future violence. In this scenario, the frontline responders have identified the following risk factors and victim's vulnerability factors: 2 nd step: 1 st step: RISK ASSESSMENT RISK IDENTIFICATION About the Integration 4 th step: services FOLLOW‐UP 3 rd step: OUTLINING ACTIONS Wrap‐up Materials The purpose of risk assessment tools is to help frontline responders identify all the risk factors and to create a complete overview of the victim's situation in order to ascertain whether she remains at risk of serious harm and can assist in the development of a safety plan.

Comprehensive risk assessment should lead to effective risk management. Look at the boxes below:

Comprehensive risk assessment should lead to effective risk management. Look at the boxes below: supporting a domestic violence victim sometimes requires help from several different agencies. All the agencies have their own role in supporting the victim. It is important to take legal actions and to support Nora's well‐being, in addition to her relationship with her mother and sisters. Nora needs support from her family members to be able to leave an abusive relationship. INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE RISK ASSESSMENT AND CASE DOCUMENTATION Police: q filing of a crime report q arrest of Peter q restraining order q making of a safety plan NGO (specialised in honour‐ related violence) q therapy meetings q peer‐to‐peer meetings q bridge building with Nora's sisters and mother Social service worker: q safe housing q economic support q psychosocial counselling Victim Support: q a support person for Nora q a legal advisor for Nora Health care representative q guidance concerning mental health services Shelter q time limited safe housing q support in safety strategies 3 rd step: 2 nd step: OUTLINING ACTIONS 1 st step: RISK ASSESSMENT RISK IDENTIFICATION About the Integration Module 4 th step: services FOLLOW‐UP Wrap‐up Materials Close x

Close x INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE Police has filed a report of assaults,

Close x INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE Police has filed a report of assaults, defamation, threatening and frauds committed by Peter. Nora has ASSESSMENT got a restraining order RISK AND against Peter. Nora has learnt from her lawyer that divorce does not affect her immigration status. CASE DOCUMENTATION Nora has a new bank account and a new secret phone number. She Case 'Nora' attends the language course in another school. Nora meets the NGO worker every week. The NGO worker has mediated the conflict between Nora and her mother and sisters successfully. After you have finished reading how professionals follow, Everything seems to be fine now, right? click the page of 4 th step: FOLLOW‐UP to learn what happens after. Click to continue… 4 th step: services 3 rd step: FOLLOW‐UP OUTLINING ACTIONS 2 nd step: RISK ASSESSMENT 1 st step: RISK IDENTIFICATION About the Integration Module Wrap‐up Materials A lot has happened since Nora's first meeting with an NGO worker. Here is told about follow‐up, obviously Under construction Nora currently stays in a shelter. She has a support person from the Victim Support Service as well as from an NGO that provides assistance for immigrant women who have faced violence. She also has regular meetings with a psychiatric nurse.

Close x INTEGRATION MODULE why a victim of DV may not be able to

Close x INTEGRATION MODULE why a victim of DV may not be able to leave the abuser: e. g. (mutual) dependency, fear or financial issues. Usually it takes several attempts FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE to leave an abuser before staying away for good. Sometimes separation escalates the violence. The victim may try to control the RISKThe ASSESSMENT AND violence by staying in the relationship. victim may leave the abuser, but the abuser starts stalking and harassing the victim. Child contact arrangements may be CASE used as way to carry on subjecting DOCUMENTATION victims to violence. In a nutshell, the situation may get worse. Case 'Nora' Ideally, risk assessment is a dynamic process. Risk assessment needs to be regularly revised. If the threat of violence continues, the process Germany Austria Finland of risk assessment needs to start over again. Effective prevention of DV and breaking the cycle of violence may require several Portugal Scotland interventions. Hungary If you want to see a short description of risk assessment process, click on the page Wrap‐up. 4 th step: services 3 rd step: FOLLOW‐UP OUTLINING ACTIONS 2 nd step: RISK ASSESSMENT 1 st step: RISK IDENTIFICATION About Integration Module Wrap‐up Materials Follow‐up is a phase, where practitioner is in regular contact with Why do we need the follow-up phase as part the victim. Read first why we need the phase of follow‐up and of the risk assessment process? then see what the follow‐up looks like in Nora's case. If you are interested to see how follow‐up is organized (or is not organized) Despite an effective intervention, an abuser may continue being in different EU‐counties, click on the flags. violent and oppressive towards the victim. There are many reasons

Close x However, Nora is scared. She is terrified of the possibility that Here

Close x However, Nora is scared. She is terrified of the possibility that Here is told about follow‐up, obviously Peter will find her. A fear of death is taking over her life. Under construction Wrap‐up Materials Case 'Nora' fear, but she cannot tell them. She feels overwhelming shame to admit to her helpers that, despite all the help and support she has received, she is terrified. After you have finished reading how professionals follow, Living with an abusive partner was easier when she did not have to click the page of 4 th step: FOLLOW‐UP to learn what be frightened all the time. She cannot reveal these thoughts to happens after. anyone. Click to continue… 4 th step: services 3 rd step: FOLLOW‐UP OUTLINING ACTIONS 2 nd step: RISK ASSESSMENT 1 st step: RISK IDENTIFICATION About Integration Module INTEGRATION MODULE FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE RISK ASSESSMENT AND Traumatising experiences make Nora doubt and blame herself. CASE DOCUMENTATION The NGO worker and the psychiatric nurse always ask about Nora's When Nora lived with Peter, she felt that she was able to control her fear. She was able to sense Peter's agitation and she always did everything to avoid an explosion. She pleased Peter and tried to reason with him. She felt how the tension was building and when the violence began, she felt relief: 'Soon this is going to be over for some weeks. Soon I can breathe again'.

Close x INTEGRATION MODULE Nora becomes even more confused when she meets a friend

Close x INTEGRATION MODULE Nora becomes even more confused when she meets a friend of Peter by chance. The friend tells that Peter is sad and upset. The FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE friend says that Peter has been extremely worried about Nora and has tried to find her. RISK ASSESSMENT AND 'He is not doing very well. ' CASE DOCUMENTATION 'Please call him. ' Case 'Nora' Click to continue… After you have finished reading how professionals follow, click the page of 4 th step: FOLLOW‐UP to learn what happens after. 4 th step: services 3 rd step: FOLLOW‐UP OUTLINING ACTIONS 2 nd step: RISK ASSESSMENT 1 st step: RISK IDENTIFICATION About Integration Module Wrap‐up Materials Here is told about follow‐up, obviously Under construction

Close x INTEGRATION MODULE Monitoring the situation and keeping a trustful and safe relationship

Close x INTEGRATION MODULE Monitoring the situation and keeping a trustful and safe relationship with the victim are extremely important. Here, Nora FOR DOMESTIC discloses to the NGO worker how she is worried about Peter's VIOLENCE condition. This leads to a discussion of Nora's fears and self‐blame. The NGO worker pays attention to the ASSESSMENT message that Peter has RISK AND been trying to find Nora. CASE DOCUMENTATION If Nora's situation changed, the frontline responders would revise the risk Case 'Nora' assessment and take new appropriate measures. For example, depending on the legislation, the police can consider secret means of gathering intelligence to prevent crimes or avoid danger. A portable alarm system could ease the fear Nora is After you have finished reading how professionals follow, experiencing. There are many options. click the page of 4 th step: FOLLOW‐UP to learn what happens after. Thank you for reading Nora's story. You can close this window now. Click to close the window. 4 th step: services 3 rd step: FOLLOW‐UP OUTLINING ACTIONS 2 nd step: RISK ASSESSMENT 1 st step: RISK IDENTIFICATION About Integration Module Wrap‐up Materials The human mind is complex. What could happen next in Nora's case? What if Here is told about follow‐up, obviously Nora calls Peter? Will Peter find Nora or will Nora Under construction return to Peter? What if Nora tells about this incident in the next meeting with the NGO worker?