1 st Nine Weeks Exam REVIEW A th

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1 st Nine Weeks Exam REVIEW A th EL 8

1 st Nine Weeks Exam REVIEW A th EL 8

Reading Selections • Three Reading Passages – One Stand Alone - 9 questions –

Reading Selections • Three Reading Passages – One Stand Alone - 9 questions – One Stand Alone - 10 questions – Poem-5 questions 24 Questions Total

Reading Passage One • Editorial about Daylight Savings Time – One graphic—map of U.

Reading Passage One • Editorial about Daylight Savings Time – One graphic—map of U. S. including time zones indicating use of daylight savings by state

Author’s Purpose • Understanding why the piece was written: Many author’s write to entertain

Author’s Purpose • Understanding why the piece was written: Many author’s write to entertain people. • Author’s write to persuade or convince their readers to believe in something. • Author’s write to inform or teach their readers about something.

Author’s Purpose-example Joe had been fishing for over two hours without a single bite.

Author’s Purpose-example Joe had been fishing for over two hours without a single bite. Suddenly there was a nibble at the end of his fishing line. He stood up on the boat and leaned out too far. Just then there was a sharp yank on the line. Joe fell overboard and landed head first into the water. Joe and his friends laughed and laughed. What is the author's purpose? entertain persuade inform

Organization of a Passage • Authors Organize by: – – – Describing Showing Explaining

Organization of a Passage • Authors Organize by: – – – Describing Showing Explaining Telling Comparing/Contrasting Remembering

Organization of a Passage-example

Organization of a Passage-example

Graphics • Being able to understand read a picture representing the text AT AL

Graphics • Being able to understand read a picture representing the text AT AL L D ET AIL S

Selection Vocabulary In the passage on the test, you’ll see this: “To end the

Selection Vocabulary In the passage on the test, you’ll see this: “To end the confusion and to create one consistent pattern across the country, Congress intervened. ” • Intervened – if you can intervene, this shows the power you have

Text Evidence • Using a quote from the text to show/prove actions or events

Text Evidence • Using a quote from the text to show/prove actions or events in a story • Think Rover Gover

Reading Passage Two • Confessions of a Teenage Drama Queen – 10 questions

Reading Passage Two • Confessions of a Teenage Drama Queen – 10 questions

Drawing Conclusions • It is easy to draw conclusions based on what you’ve read

Drawing Conclusions • It is easy to draw conclusions based on what you’ve read and your own experiences. Ex. By the end of last November, we could conclude that the Texans would not make the play-offs based on the number of losses during the season.

Organization of a Passage • Authors Organize by: – – – Describing Showing Explaining

Organization of a Passage • Authors Organize by: – – – Describing Showing Explaining Telling Comparing/Contrasting Remembering

Supporting Details • Supporting details give evidence to the topic sentences in each paragraph.

Supporting Details • Supporting details give evidence to the topic sentences in each paragraph.

Example of supporting Detail Ma i n I dea • Computers are changing the

Example of supporting Detail Ma i n I dea • Computers are changing the way we make and listen to music. For one thing, the computer has changed how we create songs. For example, composers can write concert music on laptops. Musicians can even make their computers “sing” like a Su huge choir. pp o d e t rt i n g ail

Theme • Theme refers to the central idea or underlying message of the text.

Theme • Theme refers to the central idea or underlying message of the text. Theme is rarely stated in the text –instead, the reader must usually consider the plot, characters, and setting to infer theme.

Cause and Effect *These are not always obvious in the text. Example: The cause

Cause and Effect *These are not always obvious in the text. Example: The cause is rain. What are the effects? The effects are hurt feet. What are the causes?

Main Idea • All the main points of a story – – – Who

Main Idea • All the main points of a story – – – Who When Where Why How

Summary • Stating the main idea in your own words.

Summary • Stating the main idea in your own words.

Author’s Opinion/Point of View • Writers grab their readers attention right from the start

Author’s Opinion/Point of View • Writers grab their readers attention right from the start by making their point: – – – Introduce topic or themselves Ask a question Use actions and feelings Trying to change the reader’s mind Stating reasons first

Poem “What the Page Says” • A blank piece of paper decorated with words

Poem “What the Page Says” • A blank piece of paper decorated with words • 5 questions

Mood • The overall atmosphere created by the author’s use of words. Ex. The

Mood • The overall atmosphere created by the author’s use of words. Ex. The dark, damp room smelled of musk and decay. What mood does this create?

Metaphor • A figure of speech in which an implied comparison is made between

Metaphor • A figure of speech in which an implied comparison is made between two unlike things that actually have something in common. Example: Stanza 2 of the given poem “Start with my scribble, and soon the ideas will form. Words will come marching up the walls, little soldiers bearing ideas, pacing all around you. They will become your clever companions, your fine and famous friends. ” What is the poet’s use of a metaphor suggesting? Words do what? Answer: Words help writers GENERATE IDEAS.

Infrencing • Using what you already know about a topic along with what you’ve

Infrencing • Using what you already know about a topic along with what you’ve just read and coming up with a conclusion – Example: As Sara walked into her new school, her head was low and eyes kept steady on the cafeteria floor tiles. Her heart was heavy just thinking she’d have to make new friends. As she walked into her first period class, the teacher welcomed her with a sweet smile and Sara her heart became lighter. What can we infer about Sara’s feelings about her new school in the beginning? At the end?

Fact/Opinion • A fact can be PROVEN. • An opinion is a writer’s thoughts,

Fact/Opinion • A fact can be PROVEN. • An opinion is a writer’s thoughts, feelings, and emotions.

Key Words used • • Assertion – implied, not stated directly Infer – basic

Key Words used • • Assertion – implied, not stated directly Infer – basic knowledge used with reading Conclude – ending thoughts Summary – overall theme Theme – overall meaning of text Author’s Purpose/Claim Reflect – shows/mirrors